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Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Authorities. (search)
e Campaign, June 23-July 7, 1863 31, 5 Harris, David B.: Charleston, S. C. 131, 1 Hartwell, S.: Vicksburg, Miss., Jan. 20-July 4, 36, 2 Hazeltine, Mr.: Jackson (Miss.) Campaign, July 5-25, 1863 37, 3 Hazen, William B.: Atlanta to Savannah, Nov. 15-Dec. 21, 1864 70, 1 Jonesborough, Ga., Aug. 31-Sept. 1, 1864 61, 5 Heck, Jonathan M.: Camp Garnett, W. Va., and vicinity, July, 1861 2, 6 West Virginia Campaign, July 6-17, 1861 2, 4 Heintzelman, Samuel P.: Johnson's Island (Ohio) military Prison 66, 10 Helferich, P.: Texas Coast and Defenses, 1864 65, 10 Helmle, L.: Atlanta to Savannah, Ga., Nov. 15-Dec. 21, 1864 69, 5 Chattanooga, Tenn., to Atlanta, Ga. 57, 3 Savannah, Ga., to Goldsborough, N. C. 79, 3 Vicksburg, Miss., Jan. 20-July 4, 1863 36, 1, 2 Henderson, D. E.: Hanover Junction, Va., and vicinity 91, 2 Hergesheimer, E.: Missionary Ridge, Tenn., Nov. 25, 1863 49,
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Battles of the armies in Virginia in which Alabama troops were engaged. (search)
Harrisonburg, Va., June 6. Gen. Jackson, 13,000;loss 17 k, 50 w, 3 m.—Federal, Gen. Fremont. Alabama troops, 15th Inf. Cross Keys, Va., June 8. Gen. Jackson, 13,000; loss 56 k, 392 w, 47 m.—Federal, Gen. Fremont, 14,672; loss 14 k, 443 w, 127 m. Alabama troops, 15th Inf. Port Republic, Va., June 9. Gen. Jackson, 13,000; loss 78 k, 533 w, 4 m.—Federal, Gen. Shields, 2,500; loss 67 k, 393 w, 558 m. Alabama troops, 15th Inf. Oak Grove, Va., June 25. Total loss 541.—Federal, Gen. Heintzelman; loss 67 k, 504 w, 55 m. Mechanicsville, Va., June 26. Gens. Jackson and Longstreet, 10,000; total loss 1589.—Federal, Gen. Fitz John Porter, 5,000; loss 49 k, 207 w, 105 m. Alabama troops, 3d, 4th, 5th, 6th, 8th, 9th, 10tb, 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 26th, 44th, 5th Battn. Inf.; Jeff. Davis and Hardaway's Battrs. Gaines' Mill, Va., June 27. Gens. Longstreet and Jackson, 50,000; loss Loss does not include Longstreet's a — in Hills corps. 589 k, 2671 w, 24 m.—Federal, Ge
nd his brigade, respectively, were on a field extending from the Gulf to the Cumberland river and from Nashville to Bull run. The Fifth regiment, after a month's stay at Fort Morgan, was ordered to Virginia, and pitched its tents at the Stone bridge on Bull run, in General Ewell's brigade. It was here that he received his baptism of fire, in command of a detachment that earned special mention in General Beauregard's report for gallantry in a sharp fight with the advancing columns of General Heintzelman. The Fifty-first was ordered upon its organization, to Tennessee, where at first it was attached to General Forrest's command, and, subsequently, was transferred to the command of General Wheeler, then chief of cavalry. Afterward it fought in Martin's division. It was in constant, active and arduous service, often far in front of the Confederate forces, on the flanks or in the rear of the enemy, or raiding the enemy's territory and destroying his supply trains. It was in daily co
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ove facts go to show what Flag-officer Goldsborough thought of the Merrimac, and in citing them, I wish it to be understood that I intend to cast no imputations upon him and his gallant officers. I have been told by some of them that he had positive orders from his government not to attack the Merrimac; and I believe it to be case. Let us now see what some of the other officials thought. At a council of war, assembled March 13th, 1862, at Fairfax C. H., Va., present, Generals Keyes, Heintzelman, McDowell, and Sumner, it was decided that General McClellan's plan to attack Richmond by York river should be adopted; provided, first, that the enemy's vessel, Merrimac, can be neutralized. Page 55, series 1, vol. 5, official records of the Union and Confederate armies. On page 751 I find the following letter: Adjutant-General's office, Washington, March 13, 1862. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Sir,—I am directed by the Secretary of War to say that he places at you
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Merrimac and Monitor. (search)
ove facts go to show what Flag-officer Goldsborough thought of the Merrimac, and in citing them, I wish it to be understood that I intend to cast no imputations upon him and his gallant officers. I have been told by some of them that he had positive orders from his government not to attack the Merrimac; and I believe it to be case. Let us now see what some of the other officials thought. At a council of war, assembled March 13th, 1862, at Fairfax C. H., Va., present, Generals Keyes, Heintzelman, McDowell, and Sumner, it was decided that General McClellan's plan to attack Richmond by York river should be adopted; provided, first, that the enemy's vessel, Merrimac, can be neutralized. Page 55, series 1, vol. 5, official records of the Union and Confederate armies. On page 751 I find the following letter: Adjutant-General's office, Washington, March 13, 1862. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Sir,—I am directed by the Secretary of War to say that he places at you
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of the Virginia division army of Northern Virginia Association (search)
General,—General Halleck instructed me to report to you the order he sent this morning, to withdraw your army to Washington, without unnecessary delay. He feared that his messenger might miss you, and desired to take this double precaution. In order to bring troops upon ground with which they are already familiar, it would be best to move Porter's Corps upon Upton's Hill, that it may occupy Hall's Hill, &c.; McDowell's to Upton's Hill; Franklin's to the works in front of Alexandria; Heintzelman's to the a prayer on their lips, but no tear in their eyes, bade them good-bye and God-speed in the day of battle. Never, in truth, had any soldiery such unanimity of thought, purpose and feeling as the infantry of the Army of Northern Virginia. In its ranks the professional man, the student and the farmer, the merchant and the mechanic, the old and the young, the rich and the poor, fought side by side, animated by the same principles, sustained by the same hopes, sharing the same ha
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gregg's brigade of South Carolinians in the Second. Battle of Manassas. (search)
it was that was coming so steadily and cautiously to our attack. During the affair in front of the railroad, which I have just described, General Kearney, of Heintzelman's corps, had been ordered to the support of Sigel, and had arrived upon the ground, and some of his regiments had probably taken part in that fight, as Schurz ral Gordon tells us: Ibid, p. 262. It was now two o'clock. The fight again broke out in the centre; but the struggle there was carried on by the division of Heintzelman's corps, commanded by General Hooker, and by a brigade from Reno's division. The contest was maintained by a Federal line, of which Robinson was in command on completely exhausted by its fight with us by noon that it took no further part in the action of the day. Gordon, page 259. We had fought Hooker's division of Heintzelman's corps, which, it appears, was five thousand five hundred The Army under Pope, page 194. strong, together with a brigade at least of Reno's, say one thousand
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Joseph E. Johnston. (search)
ericksburg, could swell the tide of battle against Richmond. On the morning of May 30th reconnoissances showed that one entire corps and a part, if not the whole, of another were on the south side of the river. In point of fact, the corps of Heintzelman and Keyes were across, the latter in advance. Heintzelman was at White Oak and Bottom's bridges, with the nearest support to him some six miles distant on the opposite side of the stream. The Chickahominy ran between the two wings of the armHeintzelman was at White Oak and Bottom's bridges, with the nearest support to him some six miles distant on the opposite side of the stream. The Chickahominy ran between the two wings of the army. Johnston now saw his opportunity, and to see it was to seize it. A violent rain-storm, which fell soon after, swelling the stream and perhaps making it impassable, convinced him that the hoped — for hour had struck. His orders were at once given. Written orders were dispatched to Hill, Huger, and G. W. Smith, and in writing acknowledged. Longstreet being near headquarters received his orders verbally. G. W. Smith was to take position on the left to support the attack which the other div
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memorial address (search)
up his artillery from his position near Richmond. The popular impression that the bridges across the Chickahominy had already been swept away when the fight at Seven Pines began on the 30th of May, 1861, is totally unfounded. The corps of Heintzelman and Keyes were then south, and that of Sumner north of the Chickahominy. The plan outlined by General Johnston was, briefly, that Huger should move from his camp, near Richmond, early on that morning down the Charles City road and vigorously attack the enemy's right, and Longstreet and Hill moving on the same road should attack the center and left of the force south of the bridge, while G. W. Smith's corps should advance on the Nine Mile road, and turn the left of Heintzelman and Keyes if Sumner should not have arrived, or engage and prevent the junction of his with the other corps, if he should cross. Longstreet and Hill were in position to attack at an early hour, but waited till ten o'clock for the arrival of Huger, whose divi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), William Henry Chase Whiting, Major-General C. S. Army. (search)
now developed, it is not difficult to see that the slowness was on the part of the writer of that report, who should, by Johnston's orders, have moved at daybreak on the 31st, and who failed to move at all, as ordered by General Smith, on the morning of June 1st. Although not permitted to gather the fruits of their unyielding courage, Smith's Division, under Whiting, prevented Sumner's forces from reaching Keyes' at Seven Pines (a matter of supreme importance), and deprived Keyes and Heintzelman of two brigades and a battery of their own troops. It has been mentioned that during the events narrated, General J. J. Pettigrew was wounded very seriously. I cannot forbear, in this presence where so many dear friends of General Pettigrew remain, to record for future history an unpublished letter from Pettigrew to Whiting, fraught with the pure patriotism and exquisite self-sacrifice characteristic of both heroes, who sleep in death together for the cause they served. I hardly ne
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