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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Minnesota Volunteers. (search)
in April 29, 1861, for three months. Reorganized for three years May 10, 1861, to date from April 29, 1861. Companies B and G moved to Fort Ridgly, Minn., May 28. Company A moved to Fort Ripley May 29. Company E moved to Fort Ripley June 6, and Companies C and D moved to Fort Abercrombie June 10. Rejoined Regiment at Fort Snelling under orders for Washington, D. C., June 21. Moved to Washington, D. C., June 22-26, and to Alexandria July 3. Attached to Franklin's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, McDowell's Army of Northeast Virginia, to August, 1861. Stone's Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October, 1861. Gorman's Brigade, Stone's (Sedgwick's) Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to February, 1864, Dept. of the Northwest to May; 1864. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to July, 1865. Service. Advance on Manassas, Va., July 16-21, 1861. Battle
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New Jersey Volunteers. (search)
New Jersey Volunteers. 1st New Jersey Regiment Cavalry.--(16th New Jersey Volunteers.) Organized at Trenton, N. J., under authority of the War Department August 14, 1861, as Halsted's Cavalry. Left State for Washington, D. C.; four Companies August 24 and six Companies August 31, 1861. Attached to Heintzelman's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. Wadsworth's Command, Military District of Washington, to May, 1862. Bayard's Cavalry Brigade, Dept. of the Rappahannock, to June, 1862. Bayard's Cavalry Brigade, 3rd Corps, Pope's Army of Virginia, to September, 1862. Bayard's Cavalry Brigade, Army of the Potomac, to October, 1862. 1st Brigade, Cavalry Division, Army of the Potomac, to February, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac, to June, 1863. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, Cavalry Corps, to May, 1865. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Cavalry Corps, Dept. of Washington, to July, 1865. Service. Duty in the Defenses o
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New York Volunteers. (search)
Alexandria to October 4, 1861. Franklin's and Heintzelman's Divisions, Army of the Potomac to March 24, 186a till July 16. Attached to Willcox's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, McDowell's Army of Northeast Virginias Army of Northeast Virginia, to August, 1861. Heintzelman's Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October, 1, Army of Northeast Virginia, to August, 1861. Heintzelman's Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October, 1s Army of Northeast Virginia, to August, 1861. Heintzelman's Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October, 1August to October, 1861. Richardson's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. D. C., June 19. Attached to Willcox's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, McDowell's Army of Northeast VirginiaPotomac, to October, 1861. Sedgwick's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. Potomac, to October, 1861. Sedgwick's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862.
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
's Hill July 1 (Co. E ). Attached to 1st Brigade, Franklin's Heintzelman's Division, McDowell's Army of Northeast Virginia. Advance onhington, D. C., October 21-23. Attached to Jameson's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, Army of the Potomac, to October, 1861. Unattachedashington, D. C., December 14. Attached to Jameson's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 1st Brigade, Ordered to Washington, D. C. Attached to Jameson's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, Army of the Potomac, to February, 1862. Graham's Washington, D. C., August 26. Attached to Jameson's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 1st Brigade,es of Washington, D. C., to October, 1861. Jameson's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, Army of the Potomac, to February, 1862. Military ordered to Washington, D. C. Attached to Jameston's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 1st Brigade,
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Rhode Island Volunteers. (search)
Opequan, Winchester, September 19. Strasburg September 21. Fister's Hill September 22. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. Duty in the Shenandoah Valley to July, 1865. Mustered out July 17, 1865. Battery lost during service 10 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 12 Enlisted men by disease. Total 22. Battery E, 1st Rhode Island Regiment Light Artillery Organized at Providence September 23, 1861. Left State for Washington, D. C., October 4. Attached to Heintzelman's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March. Artillery, 3rd Division, 3rd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to August, 1862. Artillery, 1st Division, 3rd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to June, 1863. Artillery Brigade, 3rd Army Corps, to March, 1864. Artillery Brigade, 6th Army Corps, to July, 1864. Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac, to December, 1864. Artillery Brigade, 6th Army Corps, to April, 1865. Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac, to June, 1865. Serv
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Vermont Volunteers. (search)
Reconnoissance to Hampton May 23. Occupation of Newport News May 27, and duty there till August. Advance on Big Bethel June 9. Battle of Big Bethel June 10. Moved to Brattleboro, Vt., August 4-7 and mustered out August 15, 1861. Losses 2 Enlisted men killed and 6 Enlisted men died of disease. Total 8. 2nd Vermont Regiment Infantry. Organized at Burlington and mustered in June 20, 1861. Left State for Washington, D. C., June 24. Attached to Howard's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, McDowell's Army of Northeast Virginia, to August, 1861. W. F. Smith's Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October. 1861. Brook's Brigade, Smith's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division. 4th Army Corps. Army of the Potomac, to May, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 6th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, and Army of the Shenandoah, Middle Military Division, to July, 1865. Service. Advance on Manassas, Va., July 16-21, 1861. B
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, United States--Regular Army. (search)
r, 1865. Companies A and E in the Defenses of Washington, D. C., May, 1861. Attached to Heintzelman's Division, Army of Northeast Virginia, to August, 1861. Headuarters. Army of the Potomac,ngton, D. C., January 7-29, 1861, and duty there till July. Attached to Willcox's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, McDowell's Army Northeastern Virginia, to August, 1861. Stone's Brigade, Divisr's Brigade, Miles' Division, McDowell's Army of Northeast Virginia, June to August, 1861. Heintzelman's Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October, 1861. Blenker's Brigade, Division of the Pry August 24, 1864. Battery D 2nd United States Artillery Attached to Wilcox's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, McDowell's Army of Northeast Virginia, June to August, 1861. Kearney's Brigade1861. Artillery, Franklin's Division, Army of the Potomac, to January, 1862. Artillery, Heintzelman's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. Artillery, 3rd Division, 3rd Army Corps,
List of illustrations. Portraits. 1. Lieut.-Gen. Grant, Frontispiece. 2. General Meade. 3. General Hancock. 4. General Warren. 5. General Wright. 6. General Baldy Smith. 7. General Sickles. 8. General Heintzelman. 9. General Sherman. 10. General Rosecrans. 11. General Logan. 12. General Howard. 13. General Slocum. 14. General Robert McCOOK. 15. General McCLERNAND. 16. Lieutenant-General Scott 17. General Halleck. 1S. General Dix. 19. General Casey. 20. General Franklin. 21. General Buell. 22. General shields. 23. General McCLELLAN. 24. General Foster. 25. General Terry. 26. General Sykes. 27. General Gillmore. 28. General Wallace. 29. General Garfield. 30. General Schofield. 31. General Sheridan. 32. General Kilpatrick 33. General Custer 34. General Buford 35. General Merritt 36. General Averill 37. General Torbert. 38. General Sedgwick. 39. General McPHERSON. 40. General Reynolds. 41. General Wadsworth. 42. General Sumner. 43. General Kearney. 44. General Lyon 45. General
Portraits. 1. Lieut.-Gen. Grant, Frontispiece. 2. General Meade. 3. General Hancock. 4. General Warren. 5. General Wright. 6. General Baldy Smith. 7. General Sickles. 8. General Heintzelman. 9. General Sherman. 10. General Rosecrans. 11. General Logan. 12. General Howard. 13. General Slocum. 14. General Robert McCOOK. 15. General McCLERNAND. 16. Lieutenant-General Scott 17. General Halleck. 1S. General Dix. 19. General Casey. 20. General Franklin. 21. General Buell. 22. General shields. 23. General McCLELLAN. 24. General Foster. 25. General Terry. 26. General Sykes. 27. General Gillmore. 28. General Wallace. 29. General Garfield. 30. General Schofield. 31. General Sheridan. 32. General Kilpatrick 33. General Custer 34. General Buford 35. General Merritt 36. General Averill 37. General Torbert. 38. General Sedgwick. 39. General McPHERSON. 40. General Reynolds. 41. General Wadsworth. 42. General Sumner. 43. General Kearney. 44. General Lyon 45. General Birney. 46. General Mitche
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 8: the siege of Yorktown. (search)
ig Bethel and over a fertile and very beautiful region, shaded with forests and embellished with the mansions of the wealthy planters. It was formerly the garden spot of Virginia, but the war had already spread its desolation over the once fair fields and they were now perfectly devastated. The farms were forsaken, and the little villages were abandoned by their terrified inhabitants. A rain storm of several hour's duration compelled a halt and during that time Generals McClellan and Heintzelman passed the column on horseback. The cheering grew gradually and constantly louder as they approached, culminating in a deafening roar as they passed and gradually died away in the distance, showing at once the extent of the line and the enthusiasm of the soldiery under such a leader as their favorite, Little Mac. At the end of the second day's march, the army encamped on a plain about two miles from the enemy's works at Yorktown. A sharp artillery duel followed. Here army life began
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