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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official diary of First corps, A. N. V., while commanded by Lt.-General R. H. Anderson, from June 1st to October 18, 1864. (search)
shelling and picket firing. July 23 Kershaw moves at 6.30 A. M. for Chaffin's Bluff. July 24, 25, 26 Affairs unchanged. July 27 At 1.30 o'clock P. M., we received orders to move our headquarters to the north side of James river. Heth's division moved over. We arrived at Chaffin's at 8.30 P. M. Before our arrival four guns of the Rockbridge artillery, on the left of Kershaw, had been captured by the enemy. July 28 In the morning we move with four brigades-Conner's, Lane'division of cavalry is also sent to the north side. July 30 In the morning the enemy is discovered to have abandoned the Long Bridge road and retired to the other side of the river, leaving a force at Deep Bottom on the right of our line. Heth's division is sent back to Rice's turnout. His trenches are occupied by Field. In the evening Kershaw recrosses to the south side by Chaffin's Bluff to halt for the night near the Clay house. July 31, August 1 and 2 Affairs unchanged. A
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 12.89 (search)
found and accurate judgment of the facts. Risks were assumed apparently desperate, with cool self-reliance and confidence in the army, that never faltered under all dangers and discouragements until all had been accomplished which, under the circumstances, could reasonably be expected. The laurel at Chancellorsville is entwined with the cypress. Brigadier-General Paxton fell while leading his brigade with conspicuous courage in the assault of the 3d. Generals A. P. Hill, Nicholls, McGowan, Heth, Hoke and Pender were wounded, to which must be added many gallant officers and privates, while many more are now but a handful of dust in the land of their choice. A name in song and story, and Fame to shout with her trumpet voice — Dead — dead on the field of glory. Chancellorsville is inseparably connected in its glory and gloom with Stonewall Jackson. General Lee officially writes: I do not propose to speak here of the character of this illustrious man, since removed from the scene o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
North Carolina, Colonel J. H. Hyman. Sixteenth North Carolina, Colonel W. A. Stowe. Twenty-second North Carolina, T. S. Gallaway. Thirty-fourth North Carolina, Colonel W. L. J. Lowrance. Thirty-eighth, North Carolina, Colonel John Ashford. Heth's division. four Brigadier-Generals reported present for duty; names not indicated. Major-General H. Heth. Davis's brigade. Second Mississippi, Colonel J. M. Stone. Eleventh Mississippi, Lieutenant-Colonel W. B. Lowry. Twenty-sixth MMajor-General H. Heth. Davis's brigade. Second Mississippi, Colonel J. M. Stone. Eleventh Mississippi, Lieutenant-Colonel W. B. Lowry. Twenty-sixth Mississippi, Colonel A. E. Reynolds. Forty-second Mississippi, Lieutenant-Colonel A. M. Nelson. First Confederate Battalion,—— —— Cook's brigade. Fifteenth North Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel W. H. Yarbrough. Twenty-seventh North Carolina, Colonel J. A. Gilmer, Jr. Forty-sixth North Carolina, Colonel W. L. Saunders. Forty-eighth North Carolina, Colonel S. H. Walkup. McRae's brigade. Eleventh North Carolina, Colonel W. J. Martin. Twenty sixth North Carolina, Colonel J. R. Lane
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Letter from General Lee to President Davis. (search)
he ranks, who are now rejoining us. After recrossing the Potomac I commenced to consolidate the troops, considering the cases individually, and united Archer's and Heth's (Field's) former brigade under General H. H. Walker, and Pender's and Heth's divisions under General Heth The accession of convalescents and stragglers is enlargHeth's divisions under General Heth The accession of convalescents and stragglers is enlarging these divisions so much that I shall have to separate them again. As regards General Davis's brigade, I think it will be better to attach the three Mississippi regiments to Posey's brigade, in Anderson's division, where I hope they will soon be increased in numbers. The North Carolina regiment of this brigade I suggest be General Heth The accession of convalescents and stragglers is enlarging these divisions so much that I shall have to separate them again. As regards General Davis's brigade, I think it will be better to attach the three Mississippi regiments to Posey's brigade, in Anderson's division, where I hope they will soon be increased in numbers. The North Carolina regiment of this brigade I suggest be attached to Pettigrew's old brigade. The only objection to this plan is that it breaks up General Davis's command; but if his indisposition will detain him long from the field, it will be best to do it, for the present at least. Although our loss has been so heavy, which is a source of constant grief to me, I believe the dama
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Two anecdotes of General Lee. (search)
T.: Return my warmest thanks to the ladies, and be kind enough to deliver the package to one of my couriers: say that I trust I may see and thank them in person. Early on the morning of the 6th, Grant, who had massed a heavy force in the immediate front of Davis's Mississippi brigade, opened fire and began a forward movement on our lines at this point. Seeing we were unable to check their advance, Colonel Stone (since Governor of Mississippi), commanding Davis's brigade, sent word to General Heth, division commander, that he must be reinforced, which brought to our aid a division of Longstreet's corps, led in person by that able Lieutenant-General. It was at this critical crisis that General Lee appeared upon the scene. After the enemy had been repulsed on the right, and while our chieftain was awaiting, in painful anxiety, information from our left wing, a courier—a mere youth—came dashing up with a message from Lieutenant-General R. H. Anderson, his small pony panting like a d
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Major-General Fitzhugh Lee of the operations of the cavalry corps A. N. V. (search)
the 5th inst. At Deep Creek, en route, the command was placed in line of battle to take advantage of the defensive position offered, and to give a check to the enemy's rapid advance. Wise's and Hunton's brigades constituted a part of the rear-guard at that time. The attack was not made upon us until after dark, and was principally sustained by Munford's command, of my old division, with a steadiness reflecting high credit upon the valor and discipline of his men. Owing to the fact that General Heth's troops were expected to arrive by the road by which the enemy advanced, they were permitted to approach very close to our lines, and it was not until Lieutenant-Colonel Strother, Fourth Virginia Cavalry, was sent to reconnoitre, that it was ascertained who they were; he having walked into their line of skirmishers, which were so near to ours that the questions asked him were distinctly heard by our troops. At another of the temporary halts upon this march to check the enemy in the vici
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
lieved this morning, and I have spent the day bathing in the Cumberland River, walking about the town, and sleeping. Had no dinner, save one solitary cracker and a piece of ham left from breakfast. We have captured several fine wagons and teams to-day and some prisoners. It is the general impression in camp that we will either move on to Lexington from here or surround Cumberland Gap and compel the capitulation of the Federal General Morgan. It is said that we are waiting for Marshall and Heth. August 20.—Spent the morning reading Northern papers kindly left by the Yankees in camp for our entertainment. I fear that we have taxed their hospitality too heavily, as the commissary stores have fallen short. No rations issued, and we have subsisted to-day on green corn and apples. We need a more substantial diet, but as we have no base of supplies we must eat what is set before us and ask no questions. We have entered the borders of the land that flows with milk and honey and can
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Terry's Brigade, formerly John M. Jones's. (search)
John L. Hubberd, Amb. Driver, Co. F, 45th Va. Batt. Edward B. Tucker, Amb. Driver, Co. B, 45th Va. Batt. Johnston B. Zorn, Blacksmith, Co. H, 17th Regiment S. C. V. Emanuel Houser, Blacksmith, Co. K, 49th Regiment N. C. T. [24] Heth's Division. H. Heth, Maj.-General. R. H. Finney, Major and Ass't Adj't General. Robt. M. Grinnell, Major and A. A. and I. General. G. Hugh Davis, 1st Lieut. and A. A. I. G. S. Heth, Lt. and A. D. C. G. A. Williams, Capt. and Vol. H. Heth, Maj.-General. R. H. Finney, Major and Ass't Adj't General. Robt. M. Grinnell, Major and A. A. and I. General. G. Hugh Davis, 1st Lieut. and A. A. I. G. S. Heth, Lt. and A. D. C. G. A. Williams, Capt. and Vol. A. D. C. J. W. Archer, Capt. and Ord. Officer. H. H. Hubbard, Surgeon. W. O. Slade, Jr., Capt. and Eng. Officer. W. H. Johnson, 2d Lt. and Eng. Officer. S. W. Hill, 2d Lt. Eng. Corps. Alex. W. Vicks, Maj. and Div. Q. M. Jno. T. Cage, Capt. and A. Q. M. W. H. Atwell, Capt. and A. C. S. R. C. Harding, Capt. and A. C. S. [15] Cooke's Brigade. Jno. R. Cooke, Brig.-General. Wm. H. Yarborough, Col. 15th Regiment N. C. Troops. G. W. Hammond, Lt.-Col. 15th Regiment
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Longstreet-Gettysburg controversy [from the Richmond (Va.) Dispatch, February 16, 1896.] (search)
to study them before he makes another speech. General Heth quoted. On the morning of June 29th General L he reached Cashtown June 30th. That night Hill and Heth heard that there was a force of the enemy at Gettysbg; early the next morning Hill, without orders, with Heth's and Pender's Divisions, started down the Gettysburord's Cavalry was holding Gettysburg as an outpost. Heth was in advance, and soon ran against Buford. There as camped some six miles back, came to his support. Heth says: Archer and Davis were now directed to advaany of his men, made prisoners. The enemy, says General Heth, had now been felt and found to be in heavy forction the attacking force retires. It seems that General Heth ought now to have been satisfied that the enemy make a reconnoissance. Hill now put in Pender's and Heth's divisions, and says they drove the enemy until thewould have been far better if Ewell had let Hill and Heth be beaten. They had put the Confederates in the con
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Joseph Jones, M. D., Ll.D. (search)
labors. He had committed to the Southern Historical Society the voluminous result of his devoted efforts, for preservation in its collections. In the last volume of the Southern Historical Society Papers (Xxii) a portion of his valuable work was presented. Since then, for purposes of reference, Dr. Jones recalled his Ms. It is to be hoped that his representatives will restore it to the custody of the Society. R. A. B. Index. Alexander, General E. P., 232. Appomattox Courthouse, Heth's Division at, 56, 306. Association of the Army of Northern Virginia, Proceedings and Officers of, 1. Atkinson, Colonel, John Wilder, 175. Bath and Romney Expedition, Hardships of, 124, 126. Battle Abbey of the South, 371. Battle, Dr., Kemp. P., 314. Baylor, Major E. W., 38. Beauregard, General G. T., Ability of, 67. Bernard, George S,, 294. Blackford, L. M., 336 Blount's Creek Bridge, Action at, 44. Bottom's Bridge, Battle of, 63. Brander, General T. A., 337. Bre
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