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The Daily Dispatch: October 2, 1863., [Electronic resource] 4 2 Browse Search
Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 3 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 3 1 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 3 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 4, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
ennessee. 9th Tennessee. 51st Tennessee. 27th Tennessee. Carnes' battery. Smith's battery. detached Brigade. Brig. Gen. S. B. Maxey. 41st Georgia. 9th Texas. 24th Mississippi. Eldridge's battery. Second Army Corps. Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones commanding. First Brigade. Second Brigade. Brigadier-General Patton Anderson. Col. A. Reichard. 25th Louisiana. 45th Alabama. 30th Mississippi. 11th Louisiana. 37th Mississippi. 16th Louisiana. 41st Mississippi. 18th Lou8th Arkansas Regiment. Hobbs' Arkansas Regiment Infantry. 19th Arkansas Regiment. Adams' Arkansas Regiment Infantry. 20th Arkansas Regiment. 35th Mississippi Regiment Infantry. McCairns' Arkansas Battalion. 2d Texas Regiment Infantry. Jones' Arkansas Battalion. Bledsoe's battery. ----battery.   Third Brigade. Brig. Gen. C. W. Phifer. 3d Arkansas Cavalry, dismounted. 6th Texas Cavalry, dismounted. 9th Texas Cavalry, dismounted. Brooks' battalion. McNally's bat
h, March 23, 1862. (Received March 24.) General Samuel Jones: Turn over your command to Colonel P port-fires, 200 primers, 800 friction. Captain Jones' company.--Deficient in clothing; officer General Cooper of the 23d instant, that Maj. Gen. Sam. Jones has again been ordered to turn over theMiss., May 4, 1862. Jones' Division. Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones commanding. Organisations. Aggregate.ompanies)193224  8941,134 Recapitulation.   Jones' division7,1119,482 Price's division8,52012,3 the West, Camp McIntosh, May 5, 1862. Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones, General: General Van Dorn directs of the breastworks. This gun is manned by Captain Jones' company of heavy artillery. Next on the uarters Army of the West, May 8, 1862. Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones: General: Bring all of your troops I am forming line of battle just in front of Jones' works, to advance, if necessary. The enemy arives near that point and await orders. Generals Jones and McCown will form their divisions in fr[18 more...]
ptorily declined, his fellow citizens, had he lived, would have insisted on electing him Governor in 1864. Thousands of the unnamed and unknown have evinced as fervid and pure a patriotism, but no one surrendered more for his country's sake, or gave his life more joyfully for her deliverance, than did James S. Wadsworth. Among our wounded in this contest were Gens. Hancock (slightly), Getty, Gregg, Owen, Bartlett, Webb, and Carroll. Of the Rebel killed, the most conspicuous were Maj.-Gen. Sam. Jones and Brig.-Gen. Albert G. Jenkins. Among their wounded were Gens. Longstreet (disabled for months), Stafford (mortally), Pickett, Pegram, and Hunter. Doubtless, their aggregate losses were much less than ours, especially in prisoners; but they were nevertheless severe, as they were estimated by themselves at 8,000. Warren, starting at 9 P. M. of the 7th, preceded by cavalry, emerged Sunday, May 8. from the Wilderness at Alsop's farm, where the Brock road crosses the little ri
ed; it was actually attempted — with many reverses at the outset, and no decidedly encouraging results for some months, but with ultimately overwhelming success. Before Gen. Grant had been placed in chief command, there had been several collisions in western and northern Virginia. The first occurred Jan. 3, 1864. at Jonesville, in the extreme west of old Virginia, near Cumberland gap, held by Maj. Beers with 300 Illinoisans and 3 guns, who were surrounded, surprised, and captured by Sam. Jones, after a smart contest, in which our loss was 60. The excuse for holding an outpost thus exposed was the necessity of collecting forage for our larger force at Cumberland gap. A nearly simultaneous raid by Fitz-Hugh Lee's cavalry, on the line of the Baltimore and Ohio railroad west of Cumberland, came to nothing; but a later expedition, sent under Rosser over into West Virginia from the Valley by Early, surprised Jan. 30. a train moving from New creek to Petersburg, Hardy county; an
ns a regular siege of, 478; captured by Gillmore, 481. Fort Warren, N. C., assailed by Rebels, 533-4. Foster, Gen. J. G., accompanies Burnside's expedition, 73; part taken by, in the attack on Newbern, 78; in command of Department of N. C. 80; organizes expedition for the capture of Goldsboro, 80; 81; returns to Newbern, 81; repels D. H. Hill at Washington, N. C., 483; makes a demonstration in behalf of Sherman, 696; relieved in consequence of his wound, 696. Foster, Col., defeats Sam. Jones at Blue Springs, Tenn., 470. Franklin, Gen. Wm. B., at West Point, Va., 126; his corps in reserve at Gaines's Mill, 156; repulses the enemy's attack at Golding's farm, 160; commands a corps at Malvern Hill, 165; ordered to reenforce Pope, 179; commands a corps of McClellan's left wing at Crampton's Gap, 199; at Antietam, 207; his failure at Sabine Pass, 339; at Fredericksburg, 344; wounded at sabine Cross-roads, 539. Franklin, Dr. Benjamin, on Negro soldiers, 513. Franklin, Tenn.
1. Samuel R. Anderson, Tennessee, Kentucky. 12. Daniel S. Donelson, Tennessee, Coast of South Carolina. 13. David R. Jones, South Carolina, Army of Potomac. 14. Jones M. Withers, Alabama, commanding Coast of Alabama. 15. John C. Pemberton, Virginia, Coast of South Carolina. 16. Richard S. Ewell, Virginia, Army of Potomac. 17. John H. Winder, Maryland, Richmond. 18. Jubal A. Early, Virginia, Army of Potomac. 19. Thomas B. Flournoy, Arkansas, died in Arkansas. 20. Samuel Jones, Virginia, Army of Potomac. 21. Arnold Elzey, Maryland, Army of Potomac. 22. Daniel H. Hill, North Carolina, Army of Potomac. 23. Henry H. Sibley, Louisiana, Texas frontier. 24. William H. C. Whiting, Georgia, Army of Potomac. 25. William H. Loring, North Carolina, Western Virginia. 26. Richard H. Anderson, South Carolina, Pensacola. 27. Albert Pike, Arkansas, Indian Commissioner. 28. Thomas T. Fauntleroy, Virginia, resigned. 29. Robert Toombs, Georgia, Army of
. not only releasing me from arrest but restoring me to the command, but telegraphic communication being in the mean time cut off, it did not reach me. Respectfully, C. L. D., Colonel Commanding United States Forces at Green River. Major-General Jones's report. To General S. Cooper, Adjutant-General C. S.: A courier from General Bragg's headquarters, eight miles west of Munfordville, on the night of the eighteenth instant, confirms the report that Bragg captured about five thou wounded. The same courier reports that up to the twelfth instant about twenty-three thousand Kentuckians had joined Gen. Smith, and they were still coming. The home guard was delivering up their guns as rapidly as they could be received. Samuel Jones, Major-General. General Bragg's report. To General S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General: The garrison at this place surrendered last night without our firing a gun. We got four thousand (4000) prisoners, four thousand (4000)
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 121.-surrender of Munfordville, Ky. (search)
. not only releasing me from arrest but restoring me to the command, but telegraphic communication being in the mean time cut off, it did not reach me. Respectfully, C. L. D., Colonel Commanding United States Forces at Green River. Major-General Jones's report. To General S. Cooper, Adjutant-General C. S.: A courier from General Bragg's headquarters, eight miles west of Munfordville, on the night of the eighteenth instant, confirms the report that Bragg captured about five thou wounded. The same courier reports that up to the twelfth instant about twenty-three thousand Kentuckians had joined Gen. Smith, and they were still coming. The home guard was delivering up their guns as rapidly as they could be received. Samuel Jones, Major-General. General Bragg's report. To General S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General: The garrison at this place surrendered last night without our firing a gun. We got four thousand (4000) prisoners, four thousand (4000)
nd six separate commands under Generals Early, Jones, Fitz Lee, Imnboden, Jackson, Echols, and McCoent my return. I captured a despatch from General Jones to General Early, giving me the position aected to carry. I marched from the front of Jones to that of Jackson at night. His outposts werle Mountain. But here a new danger arose, for Jones held the Sweet Springs Mountain in force, and p, completely deceiving, as well as mystifying Jones. He sent a force to the top of the Eleven Milcle had passed over the road in two years, and Jones's scouts told him that the road was totally impracticable, but we passed through in safety, Jones waiting the whole day, and expecting an attack Covington. Here we captured a messenger from Jones to Early, with a despatch to be forwarded to Eisclosed the rebel plans, and the movements of Jones, Echols, and McCauslin. The advance hastened ion had at that time been received from General Samuel Jones, that a heavy force of Yankees were als
mes and enormities. You burned houses over the heads of defenceless women and children, carried off private property of every description, arrested non-combatants, and carried off ladies in irons, whom you confined with negro men. Your negro troops fired on confederates after they had surrendered, and they were only saved by the exertions of the more humane of your white officers. Last, but not least, under the pretext that he was a guerrilla, you hanged Daniel Bright, a private of company L, Sixty-second Georgia regiment, (cavalry,) forcing the ladies and gentlemen whom you held in arrest to witness the execution. Therefore, I have obtained an order from the General Commanding, for the execution of Samuel Jones, a private of company B, Fifth Ohio, whom I hang in retaliation. I hold two more of your men — in irons — as hostages for Mrs. Weeks and Mrs. Mundin. When these ladies are released, these men will be relieved and treated as prisoners of war. Joel R. Griffin, Colone
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