hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 2 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 9, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 2 0 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion 2 2 Browse Search
Allan Pinkerton, The spy in the rebellion; being a true history of the spy system of the United States Army during the late rebellion, revealing many secrets of the war hitherto not made public, compiled from official reports prepared for President Lincoln , General McClellan and the Provost-Marshal-General . 2 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 2 2 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 379 results in 102 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...
ntreville. The advance of Jackson encountered him at Ox Hill, near Germantown, about 5 P. M. Line of battle was at once formed, and two brigades were thrown forward to attack and ascertain the strength of the position. A cold and drenching rainstorm drove in the faces of our troops as they advanced and gallantly engaged. They were subsequently supported, and the conflict was obstinately maintained until dark, when the enemy retreated, having lost two general officers, one of whom—Major General Kearney—was left dead on the field. Longstreet's command arrived after the action was over, and the next morning it was found that the retreat had been so rapid that the attempt to intercept was abandoned. The proximity of the fortifications around Alexandria and Washington was enough to prevent further pursuit. Our army rested during the 2d near Chantilly, the retreating foe being followed only by our cavalry, who continued to harass him until he reached the shelter of his entrenchments.
is, 585-86. Colonel William Preston, 46, 589. Extract from letter of Gen. Gilmer, 51-52. Description of Gen. A. S. Johnston's death, 53-54. -Sherman convention, 587-88, 591, 592. Joinville, Prince de, 73, 87. Jones, Lt. Catesby ap R., 164, 165, 167, 168. General, D. R., 131, 273, 283, 303-06. General, J. K., 281. Jim (colored coachman), 595. John Paul, 235. H. M., 414-15. General Samuel, 356, 357. General W. E., 434, 445. K Kautz, General, 544. Kawles, Benjamin, 532. Kearney, General, 275. Kearsarge (ship), 214. Fight with the Alabama, 315-16. Kellogg, W. P., 642. Kemper, General, 103, 273. Kennon, Lt., Beverly, 185. Report of loss of Governor Moore, 186. Kent, Chancellor, 227. Kentucky, subversion of state government, 395-99. Kernstown, Battle of, 97. Kershaw, General, 131, 361, 451, 452-53, 454, 563, 564, 565. Keyes, General, 72, 105, 106. Kilpatrick, General, 423, 426, 539. Raid on Richmond, 424. King, Preston, 417. Kingsbury, Lieutenant,
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 4: Yorktown and Williamsburg (search)
ould swarm in to help the jaded horses pull the vehicle out. Meanwhile, everything in the rear must halt and wait, and so it went on all night —a march of one or two minutes, and halt for no one could guess how long. The average time made by the column was under a mile an hour. Our movement was not discovered by the enemy until after daylight on the 4th. His cavalry was at once started in pursuit, and these were followed during the day by five divisions of infantry under Smith, Hooker, Kearney, Couch, and Casey, the whole under command of Sumner. Besides these, Franklin's division was loaded upon transports during the day, and early on the 6th sailed up the York to intercept us near West Point. Two other divisions, Sedgwick's and Richardson's, were also to have been sent by water, and McClellan remained in Yorktown to see them loaded and despatched. But the fighting next day at Williamsburg proved so severe that he rode to the front and had both divisions to follow him. Near
and is driven down by a screw to stop the aperture, its face being pressed against the seat by the contact of the rear with wedging abutments. The smaller device, with a spigot, is called a stop-cock (which see). See also three-way valve. Kearney's stop-valve. McClelland's stop-valve. Stop-valve. In Kearney's stop-valve for water-mains (Fig. 5901), the casing a has a circular opening for the ends of the supplypipe b b. c is the valve, which is raised or lowered by means of the scKearney's stop-valve for water-mains (Fig. 5901), the casing a has a circular opening for the ends of the supplypipe b b. c is the valve, which is raised or lowered by means of the screw d. When open, it slides into the chamber at the bottom of the casing, leaving the water-way clear; in order to open it the worm e is thrown into gear with the worm-wheel f, and when it is started the worm may be thrown out of gear and power applied directly to the screw. This lessens the labor of opening and closing the valve under great pressure, and the opening being effected very gradually at first, avoids the danger of bursting the pipe by sudden pressure. g is a cock for drawing off
Philip Kearny Brigadier General  Kearney's Brigade, Division of the Potomac, Department of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralApr. 30, 1862, to Aug. 5, 1862. 3d Division, Third Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralApr. 4, 1862, to May 18, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Department of the Rappahannock Brigadier GeneralAug. 5, 1862, to Sept. 1, 1862.Killed.1st Division, Third Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralMarch 13, 1862, to April 4, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, First Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralOct. 3, 1861, to March 13, 1862. 1st Brigade, Franklin's Division, Army of the Pot
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New Jersey Volunteers. (search)
tillery (Hexamer's Battery). Organized at Hoboken, N. J., and mustered in August 12, 1861. Left State for Washington, D. C., August 20, 1861. Attached to Kearney's Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October, 1861. Franklin's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. Artillery, 1st Division, 1st Army Corps, ArmLeft State for Washington, D. C., June 28, 1861. Attached to 2nd Brigade, Runyon's Reserve Division, McDowell's Army of Northeast Virginia, to August, 1861. Kearney's Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October, 1861. Kearney's Brigade, Franklin's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st DivisionKearney's Brigade, Franklin's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to April, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Dept. of the Rappahannock, to May, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 6th Army Corps, to June, 1864. Service. Advance on Manassas, Va., July 16-21, 1861. Battle of Bull Run, Va., July 21 (Reserve). Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D
20. General Franklin. 21. General Buell. 22. General shields. 23. General McCLELLAN. 24. General Foster. 25. General Terry. 26. General Sykes. 27. General Gillmore. 28. General Wallace. 29. General Garfield. 30. General Schofield. 31. General Sheridan. 32. General Kilpatrick 33. General Custer 34. General Buford 35. General Merritt 36. General Averill 37. General Torbert. 38. General Sedgwick. 39. General McPHERSON. 40. General Reynolds. 41. General Wadsworth. 42. General Sumner. 43. General Kearney. 44. General Lyon 45. General Birney. 46. General Mitchell. 47. General Reno. 48. General Grierson 49. General Rousseau. 51. General Wilson. 51. General Kautz. 52. General Stoneman. 63. General Pleasonton. u4. General Gregg. 56. Vice Admiral Farragut. 56. Rear Admiral Porter. 57. rear Admiral Foote. 58. rear Admiral Du Pont. 59 rear Admiral Dahlgren. 60 rear Admiral Goldsborough. 61 Commodore Winslow. 62. Lieutenant-commander Cushing. 63. General R. E. Lee. 64. General Stonewall Jackso
20. General Franklin. 21. General Buell. 22. General shields. 23. General McCLELLAN. 24. General Foster. 25. General Terry. 26. General Sykes. 27. General Gillmore. 28. General Wallace. 29. General Garfield. 30. General Schofield. 31. General Sheridan. 32. General Kilpatrick 33. General Custer 34. General Buford 35. General Merritt 36. General Averill 37. General Torbert. 38. General Sedgwick. 39. General McPHERSON. 40. General Reynolds. 41. General Wadsworth. 42. General Sumner. 43. General Kearney. 44. General Lyon 45. General Birney. 46. General Mitchell. 47. General Reno. 48. General Grierson 49. General Rousseau. 51. General Wilson. 51. General Kautz. 52. General Stoneman. 63. General Pleasonton. u4. General Gregg. 56. Vice Admiral Farragut. 56. Rear Admiral Porter. 57. rear Admiral Foote. 58. rear Admiral Du Pont. 59 rear Admiral Dahlgren. 60 rear Admiral Goldsborough. 61 Commodore Winslow. 62. Lieutenant-commander Cushing. 63. General R. E. Lee. 64. General Stonewall Jackso
regarded. Gen. Pope was to command the army, and to do the fighting, and in the end the contemptuous superiors of the heroic commander suffered a crushing defeat in the bloodiest battle of this campaign. The second battle of Manassas was a most disastrous one, and on August 29-30 Pope's army was utterly defeated. Lee was now pressing forward, flushed with victory, and threatening Washington. On the 1st of September the battle of Chantilly was fought, and in which those brave Generals, Kearney and Stevens, lost their lives. Learning by bitter experience the culpable folly of ignoring the genius and bravery of McClellan, and with the rebel army besieging the capital, General Halleck, in the excess of fear, was forced to again call for the services of the gallant commander of the Army of the Potomac, and General McClellan was once more placed in command of an army defeated and demoralized by the incompetency of its generals. The broken army of Pope was now united with that o
rted by the brigades of Gregg, Thomas, and Pender; also of Hill's division, which, with part of Ewell's, became engaged. The conflict was maintained by the enemy until dark, when he retreated, having lost two general officers, one of whom, Major-Gen. Kearney, was left dead on the field. Gen. Kearney met his death in a singular manner. He was out reconnoitering, when he suddenly came upon a Georgia regiment. Perceiving danger, he shouted, Don't fire-i'm a friend! but instantly wheeled his Gen. Kearney met his death in a singular manner. He was out reconnoitering, when he suddenly came upon a Georgia regiment. Perceiving danger, he shouted, Don't fire-i'm a friend! but instantly wheeled his horse round, and, lying flat down upon the animal, had escaped many bullets, when one struck him at the bottom of the spine, and, ranging upwards, killed him almost instantly. Longstreet's command arrived after the action was over, and the next morning it was found that the enemy had conducted his retreat so rapidly, that the attempt to intercept him was abandoned. The proximity of the fortifications around Alexandria and Washington rendered further pursuit useless; and the Confederates rested
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...