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Allan Pinkerton, The spy in the rebellion; being a true history of the spy system of the United States Army during the late rebellion, revealing many secrets of the war hitherto not made public, compiled from official reports prepared for President Lincoln , General McClellan and the Provost-Marshal-General . 2 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 2 2 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 2 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 2 2 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 2 2 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 9, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
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C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Fourth: orations and political speeches. (search)
is Act, it would have no legislative sanction. It is by virtue of this Act, that the present war is waged. It is by virtue of this Act, that an American fleet, at immense cost of money, and without any gain of character, is now disturbing the commerce of Mexico, and of the civilized world, by the blockade of Vera Cruz. It is by virtue of this Act, that a distant expedition has seized, with pilfering rapacity, the defenceless province of California. It is by virtue of this Act, that General Kearney has marched upon and captured Santa Fe. It is by virtue of this Act, that General Taylor has perpetrated the massacre at Monterey. It is by virtue of this Act, that desolation has been carried into a thousand homes,—that mothers, sisters, daughters and wives have been plunged in the comfortless despair of bloody bereavement, while the uncoffined bodies of sons, brothers and husbands are consigned to premature graves. Lastly, it is by virtue of this Act, that the army of the United Sta
is Act, it would have no legislative sanction. It is by virtue of this Act, that the present war is waged. It is by virtue of this Act, that an American fleet, at immense cost of money, and without any gain of character, is now disturbing the commerce of Mexico, and of the civilized world, by the blockade of Vera Cruz. It is by virtue of this Act, that a distant expedition has seized, with pilfering rapacity, the defenceless province of California. It is by virtue of this Act, that General Kearney has marched upon and captured Santa Fe. It is by virtue of this Act, that General Taylor has perpetrated the massacre at Monterey. It is by virtue of this Act, that desolation has been carried into a thousand homes,—that mothers, sisters, daughters and wives have been plunged in the comfortless despair of bloody bereavement, while the uncoffined bodies of sons, brothers and husbands are consigned to premature graves. Lastly, it is by virtue of this Act, that the army of the United Sta
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, chapter 4 (search)
e grand army was led by Hamilton's—afterwards Kearney's—division of the Third Corps (Heintzelman's)d in support, and afterwards the divisions of Kearney, Couch, and Casey were put in motion. Generamy. At length, between four and five o'clock, Kearney's division, which had been ordered in the morved. Learning the condition of Hooker's men, Kearney took up his division at the double-quick, atttwo divisions of Heintzelman's corps, that of Kearney was on the Williamsburg road and the railroad front; so that it was past four o'clock when Kearney, with his foremost brigade, Berry's brigaded, but the brigades of Berry and Jameson, of Kearney's division, which had gone up on the left, we was on Sumner's left, and somewhat advanced; Kearney was to the right of McCall. The brunt of thed remained comparatively firm. An advance by Kearney and Hooker now regained a portion of the lost was placed on the right of Porter; next came Kearney and Hooker; next, Sedgwick and Richardson; ne
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, V. Pope's campaign in Northern Virginia. August, 1862. (search)
force was to be supported by Reno's corps and Kearney's division of Heintzelman's corps, which wereefore, Pope, with the divisions of Hooker and Kearney and Reno, reached Manassas Junction, about noelman with his two divisions under Hooker and Kearney, were ordered to countermarch from Centrevilleno's command and the divisions of Hooker and Kearney. Meanwhile, Porter, in the morning, moved fool. II., p. 252. Too late for united action, Kearney was sent to Hooker's assistance, and he also The attack was made with vigor, especially by Kearney, who struck Jackson's left under Hill, at a md that part of the field of battle. This, as Kearney says, presaged a victory for us all. Still, h so that our further progress was impeded. Kearney's Report: Report of General Pope, p. 79. In fll upon Reno, Hooker, a part of McDowell, and Kearney. A firm front was maintained till Stevens' das the man most worthy to be his lieutenant, Kearney died opposing a heroic breast to disaster. [9 more...]
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, chapter 8 (search)
der his influence the tone of the army underwent a change that would appear astonishing, had not its elastic vitality been so often proved. Hooker's measures of reform were judicious: he cut away the root of many evils; stopped desertion and its causes; did away with the nuisance of the Grand Division organization; infused vitality through the staff and administrative service; gave distinctive badges to the different corps; The germ of the badge designation was the happy thought of General Kearney, who, at Fair Oaks, ordered the soldiers of his division to sew a piece of red flannel to their caps, so that he could recognize them in the tumult of battle. Hooker developed the idea into a system of immense utility, and henceforth the different corps and divisions could always be distinguished by the red, white, or blue trefoil, cross, lozenge, star, etc. instituted a system of furloughs; consolidated the cavalry under able leaders, and soon enabled it not only to stand upon an equa
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, Index. (search)
lso South Mountain. Heintzelman, General, evidence on siege of Yorktown, 110. Heth, Confederate General, on battle of Hatcher's Run, 545. Hill, A. P., on Kearney at Manassas No. 2, 186; on the battle of Antietam, 220; marched to rejoin Longstreet at Culpepper, 317; at Mine Run, 391; death of, 603. Hill, General D. H., bies of an invading army, 24; on interference with generals in the field, 96; on concentric operations, 410. Jones, General, on the battle of An tietam, 212. Kearney's assault at Manassas No. 2, 185. Kearney, General, the death of, 192; his origination of the badge system, 268. Kelley's Ford, the Union cavalry at, 268; cKearney, General, the death of, 192; his origination of the badge system, 268. Kelley's Ford, the Union cavalry at, 268; cavalry action at, 386. Kilpatrick's raid towards Richmond, 399. Kinglake, Mr., on English public sentiment on the Crimean war, 68. Laurel Hill, Virginia, Garnett's position at, 35; McClellan's plan of attack, 37; abandoned by Garnett, 38; see also Rich Mountain. Lee, General Robert E., appointed major-general, and com
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1848. (search)
on the left was driven in, and soon after a heavy attack was made on the right also. Between these cross-fires the Excelsior Brigade lay, taking the brunt of the battle till after four o'clock, when the opportune arrival and gallant advance of Kearney's division allowed General Hooker to withdraw his troops, exhausted by the long day's fight. It had been a gallant struggle against superior numbers, protracted through rain and mud and hunger, until ammunition was nearly exhausted. They had sm the hospital, was toiling with a wounded leg after his regiment, also hotly engaged. Coming up to the scene of action, this boy gathered a couple of hundred stragglers, planted them by a battery, and defended it in the teeth of the enemy till Kearney and succor arrived. Again the regiment was engaged at Fair Oaks, and through the seven days battles, till the close of the campaign at Malvern Hill. The Major had long since won the love and respect of his men; and his conduct in the campaig
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1863. (search)
nant-Colonel Wells of the First Massachusetts, to whom Stevens offered his little force, and hurried for new supplies of cartridges. The little band was saved by Kearney's force, at half past 4 P. M.; and in the reaction he was first sensible of his exhaustion and wounds, and was then carried to the hospital. Such was the scene itroops were new; this was their first battle to most of them, and for a little while it looked as badly as could be for our side. No reinforcements were at hand; Kearney's division was coming, but not yet near enough to do any good. The Rebels seemed bent on pushing their advantage to the utmost; they came on yelling and shoutingave here till this artillery is safe. Nor did he. A fierce fight followed, but they succeeded in checking the enemy and saved both the artillery and the day; for Kearney came up at last, and who could stand before the onearmed Jerseyman, as he called himself on that occasion, and Joe Hooker, at once? . . . . If I remember rig
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1864. (search)
ny of us, myself among the number. Colonel David B. Birney having become Brigadier-General, Lieutenant Birney wrote, I hope soon to be brother's Aid. August 1, 1862, he was commissioned as Assistant Adjutant-General of the second brigade, of Kearney's division, with the rank of Captain. He added to the duties of this position those of Aid in the field. His delivery of orders under fire was clear, concise, and correct. In the second battle of Bull Run, Captain Birney's collarbone was brne on the piles of the dead and dying. May 14. Although the General is my brother, I must praise him. I have tried to do my duty for his sake. Saturday night, after we had made the night attack in which Stonewall Jackson was killed and Kearney avenged, he had no blankets. I got him one, and we lay down together and slept. It was pleasant for us both to be there unharmed. The next day I was sitting by his side on horseback, when a shell exploded close to us. A piece passing under my
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, Biographical Index. (search)
. Hutchinson Family, I. 41. I. Irving, Washington, I. 307. J. Jackson, Charles, I. 395; II. 453. Jackson, P. T., I. 275, 395;II. 457. Jackson, T. J., Maj.-Gen. (Rebel service), I. 146, 159;, 263, 264; II. 168,169, 257, 421. James, G. W., II. 462, 464;. James, W., II. 357. Jefferson, Thomas (President U. S.), I. 90. Johnson, Mrs., II. 236. Johnston, J. E., Maj.-Gen. (Rebel service), I. 213. Jones, Corporal, II. 311. Jordan, Laura P., I. 116. K. Kearney, Philip, Maj.-Gen., I. 142,143; II. 400, 401;, 420, 421. Kedgie, Dr., I. 391. Kershon, Mr., I. 205. Keyes, E. D., Maj.-Gen., I. 213, 214;, 422. Kilby, Mr., I. 163. Kilpatrick, J., Maj.-Gen., 361, 416. Kimball, Daniel, Rev., I. 40,180. Kimball, J. W., Col., I. 444, 445;. Kinsley, L. J. D., I. 263. Kirby, Mr., I. 154. Knapp, F. N., Rev., I. 45. Kraitsir, Charles, Dr., I. 350. Krill, Private, I. 250. Krum, Judge, I. 163. L Laflin, Mr., I. 174. La
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