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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Hanover Court House and Gaines's Mill. (search)
his road that the troops of D. H. Hill's and Longstreet's division crossed to join Jackson and A. P.e 26. a, a, a, Approach of D. H. Hill and Longstreet from Richmond; b, b, b, Approach of A. P. Hir, to attack Union center; e, e, e, Route of Longstreet to Dr. Gaines's, to attack Union left. Of teir men. About 3 o'clock the enemy, under Longstreet, D. H. and A. P. Hill, in large bodies commed of the batteries, is reported at 1589. General Longstreet is quoted by William Swinton as authoritded to represent Cooke's Union cavalry. General Longstreet's extreme right did not extend out of tht last, near sunset, found themselves behind Longstreet's extreme right,--the brigade of R. H. Ander. The 3d Virginia brigade brought up behind Longstreet's left, passing near Gaines's Mill, and neare carried the Federal line in our front, and Longstreet on our right, bringing up his reserves, agairoops came a little earlier than those under Longstreet and A. P. Hill, but were more cautious and f[7 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The charge of Cooke's cavalry at Gaines's Mill. (search)
strange, to military ears, would sound an order to intercept, gather, and hold all stragglers on the extreme front and flank!--and the warning not to pass in front of our line on the left! Such extravagance of action β€” marching, with no earthly object, between two lines of fire β€” is seldom thus forestalled! Seriously, this passes the bounds of sanity. But it is emphasized by his map, which represents my cavalry as actually making a flank march between the lines of battle,--Morell's and Longstreet's. It seems necessary to add the statements of eye-witnesses, from different points of view,--men of well-known high character,--to corroborate my assertions and my corrections of the misrepresentations of the part played by the cavalry and myself in the battle, as found in The century article. Next morning, at Savage's Station, the Prince de Joinville approached me with both hands extended, saying with empressement, I saw you make your charge yesterday ; and next day he wrote to the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Lee's attacks north of the Chickahominy. (search)
but drank a glass of milk. Soon after, Generals Longstreet and A. P. Hill came in, and General Leessage. During the absence of General Lee, Longstreet said to Jackson: As you have the longest marrdered A. P. Hill to cross at Meadow Bridge, Longstreet at the Mechanicsville Bridge, and me to follow Longstreet. The conference broke up about nightfall. It may be of interest to the student of After waiting till 2:30 P. M. to hear from Longstreet, General Lee in his official report says:e in that direction. Under this impression, Longstreet was held back until this movement should comtion admits only Cold Harbor.--Editors. Longstreet came into action after 4 o'clock. He thus deays: Hoping that Generals A. P. Hill and Longstreet would soon drive the Federals toward me, I d by Professor Kendrick. The Professor asked Longstreet, who never looked at his chemistry, how the carbonic acid of commerce was made. Longstreet replied: By burning diamonds in oxygen gas.7 Yes, sa[6 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.47 (search)
1887.--Editors. by E. M. Law, Major-General, C. S. A. By 5 o'clock on the 27th of June the battle of Gaines's Mill was in full progress all along the line. Longstreet's and A. P. Hill's men were attacking in the most determined manner, but were met with a courage as obstinate as their own by the Federals who held the works. d torn through, the Federal lines gave way in both directions. R. H. Anderson's brigade, till then in reserve, passed through on the right, and led the way for Longstreet's division, while on the left the roll of musketry receded toward the Chickahominy, and the cheering of the victorious Confederates announced that Jackson, Ewelg to save, and in the confusion of the retreat most of the guns were captured. General Porter represents this charge as having been made on his extreme left (Longstreet's right), and beyond the stream along which his infantry line was originally formed, and severely censures General Cooke, charging him with throwing the artille
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Rear-guard fighting during the change of base. (search)
General Jackson in his report intimates that his whole command, consisting of three divisions and D. H. Hill's division of five brigades, were all at White Oak Bridge on the 30th of June. He says: It was soon seen that the enemy occupied such a position beyond a thick intervening wood on the right of the road as enabled him to command the crossing. Captain Wooding's battery was consequently recalled. General Lee says: Jackson having been unable to force the passage of White Oak Swamp, Longstreet and A. P. Hill were without the expected support at the battle of Glendale. It must be evident to any military reader that Jackson ought to have known of the existence of Brackett's Ford, only one mile above White Oak Bridge, and ought to have discovered the weakness of our defense at that point. He had troops enough to have attacked the ford and the bridge with forces at both points exceeding ours at the bridge, and the two attacks, to say the least, would have embarrassed us exceedingl
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., McClellan's change of base and Malvern Hill. (search)
e was no attempt at the Williamsburg route. Longstreet and A. P. Hill were sent across the river at his splendid prize slip through his hands. Longstreet and A. P. Hill struck the enemy at Frayser'so pass within easy range of the artillery of Longstreet and Hill, but they did not know he was therehting. None of us knew that the veterans of Longstreet and A. P. Hill were unsupported; nor did we acked, and he called for assistance, and, by Longstreet's order, Magruder was sent to him. After a weary march, Magruder was recalled to aid Longstreet; but the day was spent in fruitless marching and by Huger's division. Thus it happened that Longstreet and A. P. Hill, with the fragments of their here in force, we had better let him alone. Longstreet laughed and said, Don't get seared, now thatre still farther over to my right. Those of Longstreet and A. P. Hill were in reserve on the right he 2d. Possibly owing to the belief that Longstreet and A. P. Hill were making a march between M[1 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.51 (search)
The authority for the form here adopted is Captain R. E. Frayser, of Richmond.--Editors. by James Longstreet, Lieutenant-General, C. S. A. When General Joseph E. Johnston was wounded at the battle not express them, believing that if they were important it was equally important that Gin'l Longstreet's body-sarvant, Sah, Endu'inβ€˜ De Wah! they should be unfolded privately to the commanding ge point of view, in that they prevented the Confederate forces at these points from reenforcing Longstreet, while they enabled four Union brigades (12, 14, 15, and 16) to reenforce his opponents. The rt, each manoeuvred and fought independently. McCall's division, being flanked on the left by Longstreet's right, was driven from its position after a stubborn resistance; its place, was taken by Bur suffering less than McGlellan, captured over ten thousand of his men. in this estimate General Longstreet follows General Lee's unspecified report. The Union returns state the captured or missing
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., With the cavalry on the Peninsula. (search)
bring into action against Porter, and that we were not likely to be able to resist his attack, the cavalry was moved from its masked position to the edge of the hill and placed in a formation to charge, should a charge seem likely to do good. It was there exposed to the enemy's fire, and must either retire, advance, or be destroyed. In a few minutes the order to charge was given to the 5th Regulars, not 300 strong. Chambliss, leading, rode as straight as man ever rode, into the face of Longstreet's corps, and the 5th Cavalry was destroyed and dispersed. Six out of the seven officers present and fifty men were struck down. Chambliss, hit by seven balls, lost consciousness, and when he recovered found himself in the midst of the enemy. The charge at Balaklava had not this desperation and was not better ridden. Chambliss lay on the field ten days, and was finally taken to Richmond, where he was rescued from death by the kind care of Generals Hood and Field. In this battle there w
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.58 (search)
en back from Cedar Mountain, and the head of Longstreet's corps had joined Jackson at that place on of the situation at noon, August 29th, with Longstreet placed at Gainesville; whereas, according to made no movement whatever toward the field, Longstreet, who was pushing to the front, was able to eeneral Lee, of General T. J. Jackson, and of Longstreet and Hill, who commanded the enemy's forces ohe direction of Bristoe Station, threatening Longstreet's right. The brigades under General Wilcox hich he subsequently made against our left. Longstreet now asserts that he was in front of Porter wfought. It seems pertinent to ask why General Longstreet did not annihilate Porter's corps duringn in battle that day had been thrown against Longstreet's right while engaged in the severe fight thhe Warrenton pike (a fact since confirmed by Longstreet's report). According to General LongstreeGeneral Longstreet's and other Confederate reports, their troops withdrew at night to their line of battle of the day[32 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at the Second Bull Run. August 16th-September 2d, 1862. (search)
7 killed, 8452 wounded, and 4263 captured or missing = 14,462. The Confederate forces. Army of Northern Virginia--General Robert E. Lee. right wing, or Longstreet's Corps, Maj.-Gen. James Longstreet. Anderson's division, Maj.-Gen. Richard H. Anderson. Armistead's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Lewis A. Armistead: 9th Va.,-----Maj.-Gen. James Longstreet. Anderson's division, Maj.-Gen. Richard H. Anderson. Armistead's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Lewis A. Armistead: 9th Va.,-----; 14th Va.,-----; 38th Va.,-----; 53d Va.,-----; 57th Va.,-----; 5th Va. Battalion,-----. Brigade loss: k, 2; w, 18 = 20. Mahone's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William Mahone: 6th Va.,-----; 12th Va.,-----; 16th Va.,-----; 41st Va.,-----. Brigade loss. k, 38; w, 196 = 234. Wright's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Ambrose R. Wright: 44th Ala.,-----; 3ol. W. H. F. Lee. Brigade loss (not reported). Artillery: Va. Battery (Stuart Horse Art'y), Capt. John Pelham. Loss: k, 1; w, 5 =6. The losses sustained by Longstreet's corps are reported ( Official Records, Vol. XII., Pt. II., p. 568) as 663 killed, 4016 wounded, and 46 missing, in all 4725. Jackson reported his losses at
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