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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 8: American political writing, 1760-1789 (search)
knowledge of what was said, as distinguished from what was voted, we are dependent upon Madison's elaborate Notes, taken down at the time and corrected and supplemented by the journal; some Minutes of Yates, a New York delegate; a Report by Luther Martin to the Maryland assembly The foregoing are included in Elliott's Debates and Farrand's Records of the Federal Convention (see Bibliography).; and the letters, many of them still unpublished, of members of the convention. The elaborate pubippa, whose eighteen letters are probably to be ascribed to James Winthrop of Massachusetts; by George Clinton of New York, who published seven letters under the name of Cato; by Robert Yates, in two letters of Sydney; and in seven letters by Luther Martin. All the foregoing are reprinted in P. L. Ford, Essays on the Constitution. The pamphlet literature was equally important. Noah Webster, best known to later generations as a lexicographer, came to the support of the new instrument in
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
., A, 16 Marco Bozzaris, 282 Mardi, 321 Margaret, 324 Maria's grave, 177 Marion, Francis, 225, 315, 316 Marion, 220 Markoe, Peter, 175 Marks of a work of the true spirit, 62 Marmion, 220, 224, 261 Marryat, Captain, 207 Martin, Luther, 147, 148 Martin Faber, 314 Martineau, Harriet, 190, 191 Mason, George, 148 Mason, Captain John, 24 Mason, John, 167 Mason, William, 178, 278 Masque of Alfred, the, 215 Massachusettensis, 137 Massachusetts Agents, Universal beauty, 165 Universal Dictionary, 115 Universal Instructor in all Arts and sciences, etc., 15 Unknown way, the, 271 Unseen Spirits, 280 Untaught Bard, 163 Upside down, 305 V Valla, Laurentius, 68 Van Buren, Martin, 239, 250 Van Doren, C., 262 n., 289 n. Vane, Sir, Harry, 4, 45 Vanity of Vanities, 157 Vasconselos, 317 Vaughn, William, 3-4 Velasco, 224 Vergennes, 91 Vermont wool Dealer, the, 228 Verplanck, G. C., 240 Very, Jones, 3
hat they thought before — that they were not suitable representatives of popular sentiment. All the power in this country is in the people. It has for a time been usnrped; but as sure as the sun shines in yonder sky, that power will yet rebuke the effort to overthrow and destroy the best fabric of free government that ever existed upon earth. He commended to his hearers a perusal of the 39th number of the Federalist; and went on to allude to the efforts of Patrick Henry, George Mason, Luther Martin, and other patriots, to lay the foundation of a Government for a free people. It is amazing that with so many sources from whence we can derive the purposes of the Federal Government, gentlemen will get up and contend for a principle for which they can find no argument. No man contends for the power of coercion. --Why, then, continue to build cob-houses, that a breath can knock down? Is there anything in the Inaugural to justify the assertion that it breathes a sentiment of civil war?
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