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Border defence. --The Wilmington (N. C.) Journal announces the arrival there of Jas. C. Lumsden, Esq., of South Carolina, on his way to Virginia, with authority to tender to Maj. Beu. McCulloch, or some other proper party, the services of 200 Richland Rangers, for the defence of the Border States.
The Daily Dispatch: may 3, 1861., [Electronic resource], Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch. (search)
--There is as yet no news of the expedition, by sea or land, which has gone to capture the United States troops encamped in the vicinity of Indianola. The latter are reported to be in possession of two schooners, seized with a design to leave in them. Fifteen hundred volunteers were enrolled at Galveston in four days in reply to General Sherman's call. One thousand in the country tender him their services. Active military preparations are going on throughout the State. Maj. McCulloch's regiments for the frontier were mustered into service at San Antonio on the 25th. Forts Bliss and Quitman have been surrendered to the State Commissioners, and will soon be garrisoned by the Texas troops. Capt. Moore, C. S. A., is actively superintending the erection of batteries here. Capt. Ingraham, C. S. A., has arrived from Montgomery. Gov. Clark has confirmed Gen. Sherman's appointment by the Convention as military commandant here. The Texas Commissioners
thing, for it has been preceded for a week by daily dispatches of a similar character, every one of which has been falsified. We trust and believe that the authentic details of this affair at Laurel Hill will relieve the news of all its worst features, and reduce our misfortune to the mere falling back, after hard fighting, of a smaller force before a greatly larger one. At all events, be this news ever so true, it is far more than counterbalanced by the glorious tidings from General McCulloch's command in Missouri. P. S.--Since the foregoing was written, we have had the positive assurance of the authenticity of the following facts: That Gen. Garnett was mortally wounded in the disaster alluded to, and that the Confederate forces lately under his command retired in good order. General Garnett was wounded during the retreat of his forces. The enemy outnumbered him seven to one, but after their partial success did not advance in force beyond the point from which they dr
From Missouri. Louisville, July 16. --Missouri papers dated on the 13th inst., three days distant from the seat of war, place the belligerent force of three columns of ten thousand each, under Gov. Jackson, to be advancing towards Jefferson City. Those under Rains and Parsons, and under Price and McCulloch have driven the concentrated Federal forces into the neck of land between Warsaw and Oxeola. Capt. Burbage killed thirty and captured 150 Federalists in Cedar county. The Neosha prisoners, after subscribing to some kind of an oath, were released. [Second Dispatch.] St. Louis, July, 15 --Gen. Harris has determined, without the loss of a moment, to rendezvous in Calloway county as speedily as possible. Young men of spirit and gallantry are leaving in tens and hundreds to rendezvous in the Western part of the State. Gov. Jackson's followers are becoming bold and defiant. All the telegraph wires have been cut around Booneville.
The Daily Dispatch: July 17, 1861., [Electronic resource], The New York Tribune not to be believed. (search)
Reported engagement between Gen. McCulloch's force and 14,000 Federalists — Brilliant victory. Memphis, Tenn., July 15. --News reached here from Little Rock, on yesterday, (via Pocahontas,) that Gen. McCulloch, with 12,000 men, had attacked 14,000 Federals at Springfield, Mo., killing 900 of them, and the balance of the Federal force surrendered unconditionally. In the engagement 200 Southerners were killed. Reported engagement between Gen. McCulloch's force and 14,000 Federalists — Brilliant victory. Memphis, Tenn., July 15. --News reached here from Little Rock, on yesterday, (via Pocahontas,) that Gen. McCulloch, with 12,000 men, had attacked 14,000 Federals at Springfield, Mo., killing 900 of them, and the balance of the Federal force surrendered unconditionally. In the engagement 200 Southerners were kille
The Missouri News confirmed. --The following dispatch, dated Memphis, Tenn., it is supposed relates to a dispatch published in our paper a few days ago, in regard to the brilliant victory which Gen. McCulloch has gained over the Federalists in Missouri: Memphis, July 17.--To N. Adams: The Missouri news is confirmed. Have had fine rains the past two days. No news to-day. C. H. Halin.
From Missouri.the Unreliability of intelligence from that State. Louisville, July 20. --Dispatches from St. Louis and other points in Missouri, are utterly useless — private letters equally so. The indications are plain that the entire State is in a blaze, and nothing is allowed to be published or go through the mail tending to encourage the patriots. Nothing but items stating that McCulloch has quarreled with Gen. Jackson, and gone home, the impossible annihilation of Secession camps in districts where all are Secessionists, and where no St. Louis Dutch or Illinois soldiers have arrived, are allowed to be published.
On to Washington. From this time forward, the war is to become aggressive on the part of the South.--The tables are now to be turned, and instead of awaiting assault from the enemy, we are to attack them wherever they are to-be found.--In Missouri, the column of Gen. McCulloch are advancing upon a retiring enemy, and the movement will continue until that able General and veteran soldier presents himself before the city of St. Louis. In Western Virginia, Gen. Wise's retrograde movement will be only temporary. He will soon be reinforced, and will be able to force the enemy eventually across the Ohio river. In Randolph county, Gen. Loring, with a strong column, will re-appear at Laurel Hill and Rich Mountain, and push the enemy back to Grafton, to Whoeling, and into Pennsylvania or Ohio. Patterson will be superseded in Jefferson county, and that column of the enemy despairing of forcing their way through Winchester, will probably go to Washington, to aid in protecting the Capital
Transfer of the Arkansas troops to the Confederate States --The Little Rock State Gazette, of the 20th inst, says: Gen. Hardee left for his command at Pocahontas, on Wednesday evening.Gens. Yell, Bradley and Pierce, have been recalled from the state service The command of all our forces is now in Gens. McCulloch and Hardes, of the Confederate arms. All of the troops in the service, arms, munitions of war, &c, are now transferred to the Confederacy. Our soldiers are now commanded by able and skillful Generals, and with their superiority of material and the justness of their cause, their chances for victory are greater far than those of our enemies.
Missouri We have again some glorious intelligence from Missouri. We hope it is true. If the intrepid McCulloch has gotten a start he will now be apt to sweep the Western part of the State, while General Polk advances upon Cairo and St. Louis. We look for a brilliant campaign in Missouri. A Convention is assembled in Jands of the Federalists as it is, they would more than probably be arrested and put in prison for treason. The loyal and free citizens of the State, acting with McCulloch and Polk, will pretty surely put a veto upon the measures of the Convention. We shall not be surprised to learn, in a few days, that the Submissionists have fleate, acting with McCulloch and Polk, will pretty surely put a veto upon the measures of the Convention. We shall not be surprised to learn, in a few days, that the Submissionists have fled from Jefferson City. McCulloch is more than a match for Fremont, and he and General Polk will soon put a new face upon our cause in Missouri.
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