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too, the artillery and cavalry held in reserve drew near to the scene of action, and prepared for an immediate engagement. Several additional batteries were sent forward. Ayres was throwing his screeching missiles far into the enemy's ranks, and Mott opened an infernal fire on the centre, while far on the right and left the din of our guns was incessant, the tumult of battle loud and furious. Yet messengers, their steeds Bloody with spurring, fiery-red with haste, flew to headquarters witack three times to within range of their gunboats. Later At a late hour last night we learned some further particulars of the fight on Monday. Gen. Early is mortally wounded. Gen. Anderson, of North-Carolina, we believe, killed. Col. Mott, of Mississippi, killed. Gen. Raines, slightly wounded. Capt. Echols, of Lynchburgh, slightly wounded. Capt. Irwin, of Scales's North-Carolina regiment, wounded. The First Virginia regiment was badly cut up. Out of two hundred men i
he thinks himself so nice, Because he company A is commanding, And he will send the rebels (the nasty, dirty devils) Right into the happy land of Canaan. Chorus — Ho, ho,ho, fal-de-ral-de-da, etc. But there is Captain May, oh! he is on the way, Down where the seceders are a-training, And when he gets down there, where the seceders are, He will send them to the happy land of Canaan. Chorus — Ho, ho, ho, fal-de-ral-de-da, etc. Company C is in the field, and will make the traitors yield, Captain Mott that brave company is commanding, And when he gives them a round, he will make their flag come down, Or send it to the happy land of Canaan. Chorus,--Ho, ho, ho, fal-de-ral-de-da, etc. Captain Blystone is in command of a gallant little band, That will give old Jeffy's dogs a caning, And when they take a hitch, . . . . . They will send them to the happy land of Canaan. Chorus — Ho, ho, ho, fal-de-ral-de-da, etc. Captain Doncyson's the man that will do all he can, And he for the Union is <
to discontinue work. In compliance with these instructions Gen. Smith placed two brigades and three batteries on his left to guard against any attack from Lee's Mill, and commenced operations with his remaining brigade and battery. He posted Mott's battery opposite the dam at a distance of about eleven hundred yards from the works, sent in one regiment through the woods on the right with instructions to open fire on any working parties they might observe, another regiment on the left with similar orders, and held the remaining three regiments in reserve. As soon as our infantry opened fire the enemy replied with shell, upon which Mott opened and kept up a sharp fire for about an hour until he silenced the enemy. About three o'clock Gen. Smith had placed eighteen guns in position about five hundred yards from the works, supported on either flank by Brooks's Vermont brigade, Hancock's being brought up in support. Our guns then opened, the enemy replying for some time with rapi
ansferred to the James river without loss. On the morning of the 28th, while Gen. Franklin was withdrawing his command from Golding's farm, the enemy opened upon Gen. Smith's division from Garnett's Hill, from the valley above, and from Gaines's Hill on the opposite side of the Chickahominy, and shortly afterwards two Georgia regiments attempted to carry the works about to be evacuated, but this attack was repulsed by the 23d N. Y., and the 49th Penn. Volunteers on picket, and a section of Mott's battery. Porter's corps was moved across White Oak Swamp during the day and night, and took up positions covering the roads leading from Richmond towards White Oak Swamp and Long bridge. McCall's division was ordered, on the night of the 28th, to move across the swamp and take a proper position to assist in covering the remaining troops and trains. During the same night the corps of Sumner and Heintzelman and the division of Smith were ordered to an interior line, the left resting on
aterial needed, railroads, 103 ; expenses, 105. Merrill, Lieut., 124, 311. Merrimac, 197, 249, 257, 268, 282, 342, 346. Middletown, Md., 559, 561, 573-575, 582. Miles, Col. D., at Harper's Ferry, 558-565. Minor's Hill, Va., 96, 516. Missroom, Corn. J. F., 291-293, 296, 309, 336. Monitor, 197, 249. Morell, Gen. G. W., at Yorktown, 260 ; Hanover C. H., 370; Gaines's Mill, 414 ; Malvern, 434 ; Pope's campaign, 508; Antietam, 589, 600-602, 607. Morris, Col. D., 594, 598. Mott, Capt., 285. Muhlenberg, Capt., 605. Munson's Hill, Va., 73, 92, 95, 96, 537. Murphy, Col., McL., 124. Murphy, Capt W., 130. Myer, Maj. A., 134. Myers, Lieut.-Col. F., report on supplies, 636, 637. Naglee, Gen. H. M., 81; at Williamsburg. 331; Fair Oaks, 363, 377, 379, 380 ; White Oak Swamp, 428, 430. Napoleon, Prince, 83-85. Navy in Peninsula, 247, 264, 269, 291-293. 296, 437. Neff, Lieut.-Col., 65. Negroes, educated to emancipation, as prisoners offered alternatives, idea of li
elves. Several brigades of Longstreet's troops, though weary from their forced march, were sent on a flanking movement against Hancock's left, which demoralized Mott's division and caused it to fall back three-quarters of a mile. Longstreet now advanced with the rest of his corps. The dashing leader, while riding with Generaln of assault had accomplished its task. The Confederate line had been shattered and an opening made for expected support. This, however, failed to arrive. General Mott, on the left, did not bring his division forward as had been planned and as General Wright had ordered. The Confederates were reenforced, and Upton could do nards of the Confederate breast-works. He was now between Burnside and Wright. At the first approach of dawn the four divisions of the Second Corps, under Birney, Mott, Barlow, and Gibbon (in reserve) moved noiselessly to the designated point of attack. Without a shot being fired they reached the Confederate entrenchments, and s
of entrenchments, its line of battle, and a battery fell into our hands. The column of assault had accomplished its task. The Confederate line had been shattered and an opening made for expected support. This, however, failed to arrive. General Mott, on the left, did not bring his division forward as had been planned and as General Wright had ordered. The Confederates were reenforced, and Upton could do no more than hold the captured entrenchments until ordered to retire. He brought tweThrough rain and mud Hancock's force was gotten into position within a few hundred yards of the Confederate breast-works. He was now between Burnside and Wright. At the first approach of dawn the four divisions of the Second Corps, under Birney, Mott, Barlow, and Gibbon (in reserve) moved noiselessly to the designated point of attack. Without a shot being fired they reached the Confederate entrenchments, and struck with fury and impetuosity a mortal blow at the point where least expected, on
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.34 (search)
ence to the Sixth corps, and left an ever-widening gap between the two lines, as, pivoting on his right division, under Gibbon, he swung forward his left. Ib. Yet Mott's division had come into position on Gibbon's left, and had commenced entrenching, and Barlow was moving up to the left of Mott, when suddenly and swiftly, with a Mott, when suddenly and swiftly, with a wild yell which rang out shrill and fierce through the gloomy pines, Mahone's men burst upon the flank — a pealing volley, which roared along the whole front — a stream of wasting fire, under which the adverse left fell as one man — and the bronzed veterans swept forward, shrivelling up Barlow's division as lightning shrivels the dead leaves of autumn; then, cleaving a fiery path diagonally across the enemy's front, spreading dismay and destruction, rolled up Mott's division in its turn, and without check, the woods still reverberating with their fierce clamor, stormed and carried Gibbon's entrenchments and seized his guns. When night came down the vict<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the campaign of 1864 in Virginia. (search)
d with the movements of my own command. The report of General Hancock, however, although the uglier features of his situation are doubtless toned down, proves how near we were to a great victory. He says that Frank's brigade was swept away; that Mott's division was thrown into confusion; that he endeavored to restore order, and reform his line of battle by throwing back his left, so as to rest it upon the Brock road; that he was unable to effect this, owing to the partial disorganization of thssault upon that triple line of fortifications. The result serves to indicate how easy the victory would have been at 9 o'clock, before time had been allowed to reform. Let an eye witness, the correspondent of the New York World, tell the story: Mott's division fell back in confusion; Stevenson's division gave way confusedly, compelling the left center to fall back some distance. One of its regiments was captured almost in a body. There was imminent danger of a general break. * * Stragglers
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 15: Chancellorsville (search)
th1052 ReynoldsRobinsonRoot, Baxter, Leonard 16,908DoubledayRowley, Stone 2dHancockCaldwell, Meagher, Zook, Brook848 CouchGibbonSully, Owen, Hall 16,893FrenchCarroll, Hays, MacGregor 3dBirneyGraham, Ward, Hayman954 SicklesBerryCarr, Revere, Mott 18,721WhippleFranklin, Bowman, Berdan 5thGriffinBarnes, McQuade, Stockton842 MeadeSykesAyres, Burbank, O'Rorke 15,724HumphreysTyler, Allabach 6thBrooksBrown, Bartlett, Russell954 SedgwickHoweGrant, Neill NewtonShaler, Brown, Wheaton 23,667ng on the guns at Fairview. Here they promptly set to work to intrench themselves in the forest across the Plank road, and to cut an abattis in front. They were soon reinforced by Hays's brigade of French's division of the 2d corps, and later by Mott's, the remaining brigade of Berry's division, which had been guarding bridges at United States Ford. Meanwhile, as darkness fell, the Confederate pursuit died out upon entering the forest beyond the open lands about Dowdall's tavern. The cessa
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