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Aristotle, Athenian Constitution (ed. H. Rackham) 42 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Letters (ed. Norman W. DeWitt, Norman J. DeWitt) 42 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 40 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10 40 0 Browse Search
Pseudo-Xenophon (Old Oligarch), Constitution of the Athenians (ed. E. C. Marchant) 38 0 Browse Search
Aristophanes, Knights (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.) 36 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10 36 0 Browse Search
Antiphon, Speeches (ed. K. J. Maidment) 34 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10 32 0 Browse Search
Andocides, Speeches 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley). You can also browse the collection for Athens (Greece) or search for Athens (Greece) in all documents.

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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 5, chapter 113 (search)
It was in this way that Artybius the Persian general, together with his horse, fell. While the rest were still fighting, Stesenor the ruler of Curium, allegedly an Argive settlement, played the traitor with great company of men under him. The war-chariots of the Salaminians immediately followed their lead, and the Persians accordingly gained the upper hand over the Cyprians. So the army was routed, and many were slain, among them Onesilus, son of Chersis, who had contrived the Cyprian revolt, as well as the king of the Solians, Aristocyprus son of Philocyprus, that Philocyprus whom Solon of Athens, when he came to Cyprus, extolled in a poem above all other tyrants.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 6, chapter 34 (search)
that they should bring to their land as founder the first man who offered them hospitality after they left the sacred precinct. But as the Dolonci passed through Phocis and Boeotia, going along the Sacred Way,“The Sacred Way seems to have led E. by Daulis, Panopeus, and Chaeronea, then S.E. by Coronea, Haliartus, and Thebes, then S. over Cithaeron to Eleusis, whence it was continued to Athens by the best-known o(do\s i(era/.” (How and Wells.) no one invited them, so they turned toward Athens. that they should bring to their land as founder the first man who offered them hospitality after they left the sacred precinct. But as the Dolonci passed through Phocis and Boeotia, going along the Sacred Way,“The Sacred Way seems to have led E. by Daulis, Panopeus, and Chaeronea, then S.E. by Coronea, Haliartus, and Thebes, then S. over Cithaeron to Eleusis, whence it was continued to Athens by the best-known o(do\s i(era/.” (How and Wells.) no one invited them, so they turned toward Athens
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 6, chapter 35 (search)
At that time in Athens, Pisistratus held all power, but Miltiades son of Cypselus also had great influence. His household was rich enough to maintain a four-horse chariot, and he traced his earliest descent to Aeacus and Aegina, though his later ancestry was Athenian. Philaeus son of Ajax was the first of that house to be an Athenian. Miltiades was sitting on his porch when he saw the Dolonci go by with their foreign clothing and spears, so he called out to them, and when they came over, he invited them in for lodging and hospitality. They accepted, and after he entertained them, they revealed the whole story of the oracle to him and asked him to obey the god. He was persuaded as soon as he heard their speech, for he was tired of Pisistratus' rule and wanted to be away from it. He immediately set out for Delphi to ask the oracle if he should do what the Dolonci asked of him.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 6, chapter 39 (search)
Stesagoras met his end in this way. The sons of Pisistratus sent Miltiades, son of Cimon and brother of the dead Stesagoras, in a trireme to the Chersonese to take control of the country; they had already treated him well at Athens, feigning that they had not been accessory to the death of Cimon his father, which I will relate in another place. Reaching the Chersonese, Miltiades kept himself within his house, professing thus to honor the memory of his brother Stesagoras. When the people of the Chersonese learned this, their ruling men gathered together from all the cities on every side, and came together in a group to show fellow-feeling with his mourning; but he put them in bonds. So Miltiades made himself master of the Chersonese; there he maintained a guard of five hundred men, and married Hegesipyle the daughter of Olorus, king of Thrace.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 6, chapter 41 (search)
But now, learning that the Phoenicians were in Tenedos, he sailed away to Athens with five triremes loaded with the possessions that he had nearby. He set out from Cardia and crossed the Black Bay, and as he was sailing along the Chersonese the Phoenicians fell upon him with their ships. Miltiades himself escaped with four of his ships to Imbros, but the fifth was pursued and overtaken by the Phoenicians. It happened that the captain of this ship was Metiochus, the eldest son of Miltiades by a the king, thinking that this would be a very favorable service, because Miltiades had declared his opinion among the Ionians that they should obey the Scythians in their demand to break the bridge of boats and sail away to their homes. But when the Phoenicians brought Miltiades' son Metiochus before him, Darius did him no harm but much good, giving him a house and possessions and a Persian wife, who bore him children who were reckoned as Persians. Miltiades made his way from Imbros to Athens.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 6, chapter 43 (search)
of spring492. the other generals were deposed by the king from their offices, and Mardonius son of Gobryas, a man young in years and recently married to Darius' daughter Artozostre, came down to the coast at the head of a very great army and fleet. When Mardonius reached Cilicia at the head of this army, he himself embarked on shipboard and sailed with the rest of his ships, while other captains led the land army to the Hellespont. When Mardonius arrived in Ionia in his voyage along the coast of Asia, he did a thing which I here set down for the wonder of those Greeks who will not believe Otanes to have declared his opinion among the Seven that democracy was best for Persia:Hdt. 3.80 Mardonius deposed all the Ionian tyrants and set up democracies in their cities. He did this and hurried to the Hellespont. When a great multitude of ships and a great army were assembled, the Persians crossed the Hellespont on shipboard and marched through Europe, with Eretria and Athens as their goal.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 6, chapter 49 (search)
So the cities set about these preparations. The heralds who went to Hellas received what the king's proclamation demanded from many of those dwelling on the mainland and from all the islanders to whom they came with the demand. Among the islanders who gave earth and water to Darius were the Aeginetans. The Athenians immediately came down upon them for doing this, for they supposed the Aeginetans to have given the gift out of enmity for Athens, so they might join with the Persians in attacking the Athenians. Gladly laying hold of this pretext, they went to Sparta and there accused the Aeginetans of acting to betray Hellas.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 6, chapter 57 (search)
pollo's temple, a bushel of barley-meal, and a Laconian quartThe content of a “Laconian teta/rth“ is uncertain; for the date, see How and Wells ad loc. of wine are given to each from the public store, and chief seats are set apart for them at the games. It is their right to appoint whatever citizens they wish to be protectors of foreigners;Usually, the pro/cenos is a citizen who out of friendship for a particular state undertakes the protection of its nationals in his city; e.g. Miltiades at Athens is the pro/cenos of Sparta. But here he is apparently an official appointed to watch over the interests of all foreign residents. and they each choose two Pythians. (The Pythians are the ambassadors to Delphi and eat with the kings at the public expense.) If the kings do not come to the public dinner, two choenixes of barley-meal and half a pint of wine are sent to their houses, but when they come, they receive a double share of everything; and the same honor shall be theirs when they are i
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 6, chapter 85 (search)
When the Aeginetans heard that Cleomenes was dead, they sent messengers to Sparta to cry out against Leutychides concerning the hostages that were held at Athens. The Lacedaemonians then assembled a court and gave judgment that Leutychides had done violence to the Aeginetans; and they condemned him to be given up and carried to Aegina in requital for the men that were held at Athens. But when the Aeginetans were about to carry Leutychides away, a man of repute at Sparta, Theasides son of Leoprepes, said to them, “Men of Aegina, what are you planning to do? To have the king of the Spartans given up to you by the citizens and carry him away? If the Spartansns and carry him away? If the Spartans have now so judged in their anger, see that they do not bring utter destruction upon your country if you do this.” The Aeginetans heard this and refrained from carrying the king away, and made an agreement that Leutychides should go with them to Athens and restore the men to the Aeginetan
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 6, chapter 86 (search)
When Leutychides came to Athens and demanded back the hostages, the Athenians were unwilling to give them back and made excuses, saying that two kings had given them the trust and they deemed it wrong to restore it to one without the other.
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