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Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10 14 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Rudens, or The Fisherman's Rope (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 14 0 Browse Search
Euripides, The Suppliants (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 14 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 31-40 14 0 Browse Search
Lysias, Speeches 12 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 31-40 12 0 Browse Search
P. Terentius Afer (Terence), The Eunuch (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 12 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Hippolytus (ed. David Kovacs) 12 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 12 0 Browse Search
Isaeus, Speeches 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin). You can also browse the collection for Athens (Greece) or search for Athens (Greece) in all documents.

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Isocrates, On the Peace (ed. George Norlin), section 19 (search)
if we could be of one mind amongst ourselves, and if we could enjoy the high esteem of the Hellenes. I, for my part, hold that, with these blessings assured us, Athens would be completely happy. Now it is the warThe Social War. which has robbed us of all the good things which I have mentioned; for it has made us poorer;In Isoc. 7.9, he states that in the course of the war Athens had thrown away 1000 talents on mercenary soldiers alone. Demosthenes also bears witness to the poverty and embarrassment of Athens at this time. See Dem. 20.24; Dem. 23.209. it has compelled many of us to endure perils; it has given us a bad name among the Hellenes; and itens had thrown away 1000 talents on mercenary soldiers alone. Demosthenes also bears witness to the poverty and embarrassment of Athens at this time. See Dem. 20.24; Dem. 23.209. it has compelled many of us to endure perils; it has given us a bad name among the Hellenes; and it has in every way overwhelmed us with misfortune.
Isocrates, On the Peace (ed. George Norlin), section 21 (search)
Nay, we shall see our city enjoying twice the revenuesAccording to Demosthenes (Dem. 10.37-38) Athens before the peace had an income of 130 talents; after the peace of 400 talents. which she now receives, and thronged with merchants and foreigners and resident aliens,Foreigners, whether merchants or not, had to pay nonresident fees, cenika\ te/lh; resident aliens paid the metoi/kion of 12 drachmas per man and 6 per woman. by whom she is now deserted.And, what is most important of all, we shalleserted.And, what is most important of all, we shall have all mankind as our allies—allies who will not have been forced, but rather persuaded, to join with us, who will not welcome our friendship because of our power when we are secure only to abandon us when we are in peril,The reference is to the allies who revolted from Athens both during the Confederacy of Delos and during the New Naval League. but who will be disposed towards us as those should be who are in very truth allies and fri
Isocrates, On the Peace (ed. George Norlin), section 22 (search)
not think that Cersobleptes will wage war with us over the Chersonese, or PhilipThese are singled out because both Cersobleptes, now virtually master of the Thracian Chersonnes, and Philip, with his growing empire in the north Aegean, were giving Athens trouble at this time. over Amphipolis,See the opening of the Address to Philip, Isoc. 5. when they see that we do not covet any of the possessions of other peoples. It is true that as things are now they have good reason to be afraid to make Athr with us over the Chersonese, or PhilipThese are singled out because both Cersobleptes, now virtually master of the Thracian Chersonnes, and Philip, with his growing empire in the north Aegean, were giving Athens trouble at this time. over Amphipolis,See the opening of the Address to Philip, Isoc. 5. when they see that we do not covet any of the possessions of other peoples. It is true that as things are now they have good reason to be afraid to make Athens a near neighbor to their dominions;
Isocrates, On the Peace (ed. George Norlin), section 23 (search)
for they see that we are not content with what we have but are always reaching out for more. If, however, we change our ways and gain a better reputation, they will not only withdraw from our territory but will give us besides territory of their own. For it will be to their advantage to cherish and support the power of Athens and so be secure in the possession of their own kingdoms.
Isocrates, On the Peace (ed. George Norlin), section 25 (search)
Now as to the promises held out by the ambassadors,Probably from the former allies with whom Athens was now at war. what I have said is enough, although one might perhaps add many things to what I have said. But I think we should not go forth from this assembly, having merely adopted resolutions in favor of the peace, without also taking counsel how we shall keep it, and not do what we are in the habit of doing—namely, getting ourselves involved again in the same disorders after a short interval of timeCf. Isoc. 5.8.—and how we shall devise, not merely a postponement, but some means of permanent deliverance from our present il
Isocrates, On the Peace (ed. George Norlin), section 29 (search)
e sea with many triremes and compel the various states to pay contributionsIn the Confederacy of Delos the quotas paid to Athens to support the league were termed fo/roi, which, when Athens made it compulsory, came to have the invidious meaning “tribAthens made it compulsory, came to have the invidious meaning “tribute moneys.” In the New Naval League, the term sunta/ceis, contributions, was substituted. Cf. Isoc. 15.123 and Isoc. 7.2. and send representativesTo the Common Council of the allies, to\ koino\n sune/drion tw=n summa/xiwn, which met in Athens. to Athens. to Athens, we have accomplished something to the purpose. But in fact, we have been completely misled as to the truth; for of the hopes which we cherished not one has been fulfilled; on the contrary, we have reaped from them hatreds and wars and greaAthens, we have accomplished something to the purpose. But in fact, we have been completely misled as to the truth; for of the hopes which we cherished not one has been fulfilled; on the contrary, we have reaped from them hatreds and wars and great expense. And this was to be expe
Isocrates, On the Peace (ed. George Norlin), section 30 (search)
for in former times as the result of such meddlesomeness we were placed in the utmost peril,At the end of the Peloponnesian War, which was the end of the Confederacy of Delos and of the Empire of Athens. while as the result of keeping our city in the path of justice and of giving aid to the oppressed and of not coveting the possessions of others we were given the hegemony by the willing consent of the HellenesIn 478 B.C., when the Confederacy of Delos (see Isoc. 12.67 ff. and notes)was formed, T path of justice and of giving aid to the oppressed and of not coveting the possessions of others we were given the hegemony by the willing consent of the HellenesIn 478 B.C., when the Confederacy of Delos (see Isoc. 12.67 ff. and notes)was formed, Thucydides states that the Ionian Greeks came to Athens and asked her to take the hegemony. See i. 95, 96. Cf. Isoc. 4.72.—considerations which now and for a long time past, without reason and with utter recklessness, we have treated with
Isocrates, On the Peace (ed. George Norlin), section 37 (search)
hey mean those who lived at the time of the Persian WarsSee 75. or those who governed the city before the Decelean WarThis term is frequently used to denote the last decade of the Peloponnesian War, from the occupation of the fort of Decelea near Athens by the Spartans in 413 B.C. Cf. 84. During this period the affairs of Athens went from bad to worse.? If they mean the latter then they are simply advising us to run the risk once again of being enslavedAs at the end of the Peloponnesian War. those who lived at the time of the Persian WarsSee 75. or those who governed the city before the Decelean WarThis term is frequently used to denote the last decade of the Peloponnesian War, from the occupation of the fort of Decelea near Athens by the Spartans in 413 B.C. Cf. 84. During this period the affairs of Athens went from bad to worse.? If they mean the latter then they are simply advising us to run the risk once again of being enslavedAs at the end of the Peloponnesian War. Cf. 78.;
Isocrates, On the Peace (ed. George Norlin), section 38 (search)
but if they mean those who at Marathon conquered the barbarians, then they are of all men the most brazen, if, that is to say, they praise those who governed Athens at that time and in the same breath would persuade us to act in a manner contrary to theirs and to commit blunders so gross that I am at a loss what I should do—whether I should speak the truth as on all other occasions or be silent out of fear of making myself odious to you. For while it seems to me the better course to discuss your blunders, I observe that you are more resentful towards those who take you to task than towards those who are the authors of your misfortunes
Isocrates, On the Peace (ed. George Norlin), section 41 (search)
I have said these things at the outset because in the rest of my discourse I am going to speak without reserve and with complete frankness. For suppose that a stranger from another part of the world were to come to Athens,Cf. Isoc. 4.133. having had no time to be tainted with our depravity, but brought suddenly face to face with what goes on here, would he not think that we are mad and bereft of our senses, seeing that we plume ourselves upon the deeds of our ancestors and think fit to eulogize our city by dwelling upon the achievements of their time and yet act in no respect like them but do the very opposite?
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