Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Winfield Scott or search for Winfield Scott in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hamilton, Schuyler 1822- (search)
chuyler 1822- Military officer; born in New York City, July 25, 1822; graduated at West Point in 1841; served in the war with Mexico; and was acting aide to General Scott. He was severely wounded in a hand-to-hand engagement with Mexicans. He was bre vetted captain, and remained on Scott's staff until 1854. He left the army iScott's staff until 1854. He left the army in 1855, but on the fall of Sumter (1861) he joined the 7th New York Regiment as a private. He became aide to General Butler at Annapolis, and soon entered the military family of General Scott at Washington. He was made brigadier-general in November, 1861, and accompanied General Halleck to Missouri, where he commanded the distriGeneral Scott at Washington. He was made brigadier-general in November, 1861, and accompanied General Halleck to Missouri, where he commanded the district of St. Louis. In February, 1862, he commanded a division of Pope's army; and by the planning and construction of a canal, greatly assisted in the capture of New Madrid and Island number ten (q. v.). In September, 1862, he was made major-general of volunteers. He resigned in February, 1863; and was hydrographic engineer for the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Harper's Ferry, (search)
June 16 and 17 about 9,000 of his troops crossed the Potomac by fording it at Williamsport. These were led by Brig.-Gen. George Cadwalader, at the lead of five companies of cavalry. At that moment Patterson received orders by telegraph from General Scott, at Washington, to send to him all the regulars, horse and foot, under his (Patterson's) command, and a Rhode Island regiment. Patterson was embarrassed, and requested the general to leave the regulars with him, for he expected to hold the position and to keep open a free communication with the great West by the Baltimore and Ohio Railway. Scott refused, saying, We are pressed here; send the troops without delay. The order was obeyed, and Patterson was left without a single piece of available artillery, with only one troop of raw cavalry, and a total force of not more than 10,000 men, mostly undisciplined, to confront Johnston with fully 15,000 drilled troops. Patterson prudently recrossed the Potomac, and remained on the Mar
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Harrison, William Henry 1773-1812 (search)
nd of the Indians, he should be compelled to join that people in war against the people of the United States. Before the declaration of war against England in June, 1812, Kentucky and Ohio made preparations for such an event. Early in May Governor Scott, of Kentucky, in obedience to instructions from the War Department, had organized ten regiments of volunteers, making an effective force of 5,500 men; and Governor Meigs, of Ohio, promptly responded to the call for troops to accompany Hull sacre at Chicago caused the greatest excitement in Kentucky, and volunteers were offered by thousands. It was the general desire of the volunteers and militia of the West that Harrison should be their leader against the British and Indians. Governor Scott was requested by some of the leading men in Kentucky to appoint him commander-in-chief of the forces of that State, and he was commissioned Aug. 25, 1812. A corps of mounted volunteers was raised, and Maj. Richard M. Johnson became their lea
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hart, Jonathan 1748- (search)
Hart, Jonathan 1748- Military officer; born in Kensington, Conn., in 1748; graduated at Yale in 1768; enlisted in the Continental army, serving throughout the War of the Revolution, attaining the rank of captain. After the war he entered the regular army as captain; was promoted to major. He participated in various campaigns against the Indians under Generals Scott, Harmar, and St. Clair. In the battle with the Miami Indians, while protecting the rear of the army, he and his command were overwhelmed by superior numbers and almost all were killed. He was the author of the Native inhabitants of the Western country, which appeared in vol. III. of the Transactions of the American Society. He died on Miami River, O., Nov. 4, 1791.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hatch, John Porter 1822- (search)
Hatch, John Porter 1822- Military officer; born in Oswego, N. Y., Jan. 9, 1822; graduated at West Point in 1845; served under General Scott in Mexico. In September, 1861, he was made a brigadiergeneral of volunteers, and assigned to a cavalry brigade under General King. He commanded the cavalry of the 5th Corps in the campaign in the Shenandoah Valley in the early part of 1862. In July he took command of an infantry brigade, and in August that of King's division. He was wounded at Manassas, and at South Mountain. He also commanded forces on John's Island, near Charleston, S. C., in July, 1864, and commanded the coast division of the Department of the South from November, 1864, to February, 1865. He cooperated with Sherman while moving through the Carolinas. He was brevetted brigadier-general, United States army, and major-general of volunteers, March 13, 1865; commissioned colonel of the 2d Cavalry in 1881; and retired Jan. 9, 1886.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kearny, Philip 1815- (search)
wards the government sent him to Europe to study and report upon French cavalry tactics. While there he fought in the French Philip Kearny. army in Africa as a volunteer, and returned in 1840 with the cross of the Legion of Honor. Aide to General Scott (1841-44), he was made captain in the United States army, and served on the staff of Scott in the war with Mexico, receiving great applause. Near the city of Mexico he lost his left arm in battle. After serving a campaign on the Pacific coaScott in the war with Mexico, receiving great applause. Near the city of Mexico he lost his left arm in battle. After serving a campaign on the Pacific coast against the Indians, he went to Europe, and served on the staff of the French General Maurier in the Italian War (1859). He received from the French government a second decoration of the Legion of Honor. He hastened home when the Civil War broke out; was made brigadiergeneral of volunteers just after the battle of Bull Run, and commanded a brigade of New Jersey troops in Franklin's division, Army of the Potomac. He comhanded a division in Heintzelman's corps; behaved gallantly during the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Medals. (search)
f Chippewa, etc.Gold. Nov. 3, 1814Maj.-Gen. Peter B. PorterVictory of Chippewa, etc.Gold. Nov. 3, 1814Brig.-Gen. E. W. RipleyVictory of Chippewa, etc.Gold. Nov. 3, 1814Brig.-Gen. James MillerVictory of Chippewa, etc.Gold. Nov. 3, 1814Maj.-Gen. Winfield ScottVictory of Chippewa, etc.Gold. Nov. 3, 1814Maj.-Gen. Edmund P. GainesVictory of ErieGold. Nov. 3, 1814Maj.-Gen. Alexander MacombVictory of PlattsburgGold. Feb. 27, 1815Maj.-Gen. Andrew JacksonVictory of New OrleansGold. Feb. 22, 1816C GrandeGold. March 2, 1847Maj.-Gen. Zachary TaylorCapture of MontereyGold. March 3, 1847British, French, and Spanish officers and crewsRescuing crew of U. S. brig-of-war Somers before Vera Cruz, Dec. 7, 1846Gold & silver. March 9, 1848Maj.-Gen. Winfield ScottMexican campaignGold May 9, 1848Maj.-Gen. Zachary TaylorVictory of Buena VistaGold. Aug. 4, 1854Capt. Duncan N. IngrahamRelease of Martin KosztaGold. May 11, 1858Dr. Frederick H. Rose, of the British navyFor humanity—care of yellow-fev
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mexico, War with (search)
rying on the war. The Secretary of War and General Scott planned a magnificent campaign. On May 23 all northern Mexico was now complete, and General Scott was on his march for the capital. He had endered with the castle of San Juan de Ulloa. Scott took possession of the city two days afterward pass at the foot of the Eastern Cordilleras. Scott had followed Twiggs with the rest of his army,e army rested until August. Being reinforced, Scott then pushed on towards the capital. From thatthe quiet valley of Mexico, centuries before. Scott now beheld that Battle of Churubusco. spacentered the city of Mexico in triumph, but General Scott preferred to bear the olive-branch rather s of the city. When the trick was discovered, Scott declared the armistice at an end, and advancedion from the municipal authorities waited upon Scott, begging him to spare the town and treat for pcountries have never since been broken. General Scott's entry into the City of Mexico. For do[1 more...]
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Presidential elections. (search)
5 James G. BirneyN. Y.Lib62,300Thomas MorrisO.Lib 1848. Zachary Taylor For foot-note references see page 291.LaWhig1,360,101139,557163Millard Fillmore For foot-note references see page 291.N. Y.Whig163 Lewis CassMich.Dem1,220,544127William O. ButlerKyDem127 Martin Van BurenN. Y.F. Soil291,263Charles F. AdamsMass.F. Soil 1852. Franklin Pierce For foot-note references see page 291.N. H.Dem1,601,474220,896254William R. King For foot-note references see page 291.AlaDem254 Winfield ScottN. J.Whig1,380,57642William A. GrahamN. C.Whig42 John P. HaleN. H.F. D. (i)156,149George W. JulianInd.F. D. Daniel Webster (k)Mass.Whig1,670 1856. James Buchanan For foot-note references see page 291.PaDem1,838,169496,905174J. C. Breckinridge For foot-note references see page 291.KyDem174 John C. FremontCalRep1,341,264114William L. DaytonN. J.Rep114 Millard FillmoreN. Y.Amer874,5388A. J. DonelsonTennAmer8 1860. Abraham Lincoln For foot-note references see page 291.Ill.Rep
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Puebla, (search)
Many of the churches and convents are rich in gold and silver ornaments, paintings, and statues. The city is about 7,000 feet above the level of the sea, and contained (1895) 88,684 inhabitants. After his victory at Cerro Gordo (q. v.), General Scott pressed forward on the great national road over the Cordilleras. General Worth had joined the army, and with his division led the way. They entered the strongly fortified town of Jalapa, April 19, 1847, and a few days afterwards Worth unfurls gained fifty-four pieces of artillery and an immense quantity of munitions of war. Onward the victors swept over the lofty Cordilleras, and on May 15 they halted at the sacred Puebla de los Angeles, where they remained until August. There Scott counted up the fruits of his invasion thus far. In the space of two months he had made 10,000 Mexican prisoners and captured 700 pieces of artillery, 10,000 muskets, and 20,000 shot and shell; and yet, when he reached Puebla, his whole effective
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