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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
and others, there was behind the scenes some adverse influence which was too powerful to be overcome, which Mr. O'Conor believed emanated from the Secretary of State, W. H. Seward. When Mr. Reverdy Johnson, the senator from Maryland, applied to Seward to help him in the effort to secure bail, Seward pointed to the scar on his neck, made by the knife of the assassin, and said: You can hardly expect me to aid you. On the 10th of May, 1866, the House of Representatives adopted a resolution intSeward pointed to the scar on his neck, made by the knife of the assassin, and said: You can hardly expect me to aid you. On the 10th of May, 1866, the House of Representatives adopted a resolution introduced by Mr. Boutwell, of Massachusetts, instructing the Judiciary Committee to inquire whether there was probable cause for believing in the criminality alleged against Davis and others, and whether any legislation was necessary to bring them to a speedy and impartial trial. To this committee it was that Colonel Turner was assigned as Judge Advocate, and it was due to his intelligent and indefatigable efforts that the frauds which had been practiced upon the Judge Advocate-General in the mat
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The trials and trial of Jefferson Davis. (search)
and others, there was behind the scenes some adverse influence which was too powerful to be overcome, which Mr. O'Conor believed emanated from the Secretary of State, W. H. Seward. When Mr. Reverdy Johnson, the senator from Maryland, applied to Seward to help him in the effort to secure bail, Seward pointed to the scar on his neck, made by the knife of the assassin, and said: You can hardly expect me to aid you. On the 10th of May, 1866, the House of Representatives adopted a resolution intSeward pointed to the scar on his neck, made by the knife of the assassin, and said: You can hardly expect me to aid you. On the 10th of May, 1866, the House of Representatives adopted a resolution introduced by Mr. Boutwell, of Massachusetts, instructing the Judiciary Committee to inquire whether there was probable cause for believing in the criminality alleged against Davis and others, and whether any legislation was necessary to bring them to a speedy and impartial trial. To this committee it was that Colonel Turner was assigned as Judge Advocate, and it was due to his intelligent and indefatigable efforts that the frauds which had been practiced upon the Judge Advocate-General in the mat
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Treachery of W. H. Seward brought fire on Sumter. (search)
next day, April 13, Judge Campbell, through whom Mr. Seward had given his assurances to the Confederate authof the fort, wrote and published an open letter to Mr. Seward charging that systematic duplicity had been practn came in, one of the earliest acts of his Secretary of State Seward was to assure the Confederates in the most will add that there can be no mistake about what Mr. Seward promised the Confederates, for after each interviould put down in writing what he had been told by Mr. Seward, and then after reading the same to Judge Nelson,s, and after so doing, would report in writing to Mr. Seward what he had transmitted. Mr. Seward was, therefoMr. Seward was, therefore, kept posted as to exactly what communications were being sent to the Confederates. And to place the matte the very last communication which passed between Mr. Seward and the Commissioners, and which was on April 7, Mr. Seward was addressed in writing over the signature of Judge Campbell, and asked if the assurances which ha
October 31, 1864. Hon. E. M. Stanton: We have a village of over three thousand inhabitants, ten miles from the Canada line; principal shops of Ogdensburg road here; we will take care of ourselves, if you will give us arms and ammunition. The fire-arms under the control of the provost-marshal here are worthless. Will you give him arms for our use? Refer to Major McKeever, in your department, Governor Morton, or Treasurer Spinner. Respectfully, W. H. Wheeler. Mr. Jackson to Secretary Seward.—(telegram.) Halifax, N. S., November 1, 1864. Hon. W. H. Seward, Secretary of State: It is secretly asserted by secessionists here, that plans have been formed and will be carried into execution by rebels and their allies, for setting fire to the principal cities in the Northern states on the day of the presidential election. M. M. Jackson, United States Consul. General Dix to Secretary Stanton.—(telegram.) New York, November 4, 1864. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: W
nd shall be entirely abandoned for the future. I shall, therefore, await anxiously your reply, after referring to the authorities of the Confederate States. I am, etc., Russell. J. M. Mason, Esq., J. Slidell, Esq., J. Mann, Esq. Secretary of state Seward to Hon. Charles F. Adams, United States Minister to England.—(Extract.) Department of state, Washington, March 9, 1865. In accordance with Earl Russell's suggestion, the Secretary of War has, by direction of the President, transmit written on that occasion to the Secretary of War, and so soon as we shall have received a report from the Lieutenant-General of his proceedings in the matter, I will communicate the result to you for the information of Earl Russell. Secretary of state Seward to Secretary of War Stanton. Department of state. Washington, March 8, 1865. sir: The enclosed paper has been received at this department from Earl Russell, her Britannic Majesty's principal Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, w
., 214. Sergeant and sentry guard, Long Bridge, Va., VIII, 81. Seven Days Battles: I., 83, 132, 299, 312 seq., 315, 320, 337; military result of, I., 338, 340, 342, 366; IV., 238; V., 33, 66; VII., 233; VIII., 346, 382; IX., 75, 79, 144; fighting around Richmond, X., 64, 142; losses at, X., 142, 156. Seven Pines, Va. (see also Fair Oaks, Va.): I., 122, 282, 288, 291, 292, 364; V., 304, 314; VII., 102; battle of, IX., 59. Seventh Street Road, D. C., V., 94, 106. Seward, W. H.: VI., 25; VII., 192; quoted, VII., 196, 205; attempt at assassination of, VII., 211; VIII., 94, 278; X., 12. Sewell's Point, Va.: VI., 164, 165, 172, 180; Confederate battery at, VI., 308, 314. Sexton, J. A., X., 296. Sexton, J. W., VII, 17. Seymour, T.: III., 42, 50; X., 307. Seymour,, U. S. S.: I., 356; III., 318. Shackleford, J. M.: II., 340, 342, 344, 348. Shafter, W. R., X., 215. Shaler, A.: III., 50; X., 227. Sham battle near
is about to be appointed by Pennsylvania to meet the Virginia Commissioners in this city, and that ex-Governor Packer has consented to act as one. Before this commission starts for Washington, it is absolutely essential that the Legislature of Pennsylvania should comply with that portion of Gov. Curtin's Message and that part of Gov. Packer's valedictory, in which the repeal of all laws which, by implication, may be construed to interfere with the Fugitive Slave law is recommended. Gov. Seward has taken the initiative, with other prominent gentlemen, in getting up a grand Inauguration Ball, at which men of all sections can join, and dance "all hands round." Bills are being prepared by the Military and Naval Committees of the House, and by the Committee of Ways and Means, for immediately placing the country upon a war footing.--The President will be authorized to call for the enlistment of volunteers, and a considerable number of war steamers will be forth with ordered to b
W. H. Seward. The Washington correspondent of the New York Express, in a tribute to the personal popularity of Senator Jefferson Davis, of Mississippi, even among the Republicans, says: "It was in the house of Col. Davis that Mr. Seward made the remarkable confession, about a year ago, that his own peculiar notions on the slavery question were maintained merely for political effect. So, at least, Col. Davis has frequently asserted, and without contradiction. It seems, therefore, thaMr. Seward made the remarkable confession, about a year ago, that his own peculiar notions on the slavery question were maintained merely for political effect. So, at least, Col. Davis has frequently asserted, and without contradiction. It seems, therefore, that we, the people, are about to fly at each other's throats like bull-dogs, merely to uphold a set of men who have mounted the negro not because they love him, but because, through him, they hope to dictate, from the high places of the Government, to the white man. This is 'Republicanism' with a vengeance." This is indeed "Republicanism," and, alas! the melancholy history of all Republics is, that not only the people have been sacrificed, but at last, the Republic itself, to gratify the am
ation. Richmond, Va. May 24, 1861. A distinguished gentleman whose name is known and respected in all sections of this country, and whose veracity has never been questioned, recently passed through this city, and while here he made known a very important fact. He said that early in the history of the Lincoln Administration General Scott addressed a letter to Abraham Lincoln, stating that he would never fight against Virginia and the South, and recommending a conciliatory policy. W. H. Seward replied, assuring the old General that Mr. Lincoln would coerce, even though it might lead to securing another Commander-in-Chief of the U. S. forces. General Scott finally yielded to Black Republican pressure, though the Administration doubt as to his being heart and soul with them, and hence are in favor of substituting a younger and more energetic man. I believe the above information is reliable, and therefore place it at your disposal. General Scott has not, and cannot have, that zea
d that the rebel force is by far more formidable than at first supposed. They anticipate immediate hostilities. Recruiting is said to be going on in various parts of Maryland. A gentleman from Prince George's county, says recruits for the Confederate army are being carried across the Potomac to Alexandria daily. Contraband goods are also being sent to the rebels. So it appears that treason is not crushed out in Maryland yet. Another rumor is afloat here, to the effect that Secretary Seward has just received dispatches from England declaring the intention of that Government not to recognize the Code of the Congress of Paris, of 1856, which denounces privateering as piracy, and alleging that this Code was the act of all the great powers of Europe, in Congress assembled, and it is manifestly not in her power as one of the signers of that compact, to accept, at this late day, the tardy acceptance of the United States. I do not, and cannot believe this is true, or that Englan
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