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W. H. Seward abroad. The London journals are beginning to discover that their American pet, W. H. Seward, is not altogether worthy of their confidence. The assumed fact that he is to be SecretaW. H. Seward, is not altogether worthy of their confidence. The assumed fact that he is to be Secretary of State of the incoming administration, in connection with his late givings out on the subject of annexing Canada to the United States, does not afford them the delight that was anticipated. The n of public virtue may be. Many of them have asserted that the person of most mark among them, Mr. Seward, is excluded from the Presidency by his very virtues; and yet Mr. Seward strikes the foreign oMr. Seward strikes the foreign observer as one of the most unprincipled politicians who ever tried to gratify an interested ambition. In his appeals to all the vulgarest prejudices of Americans, in pandering to their greed of terrie South by the silly promise that they will soon have the British dependencies. Yet this very Mr. Seward will almost certainly have the refusal of the Secretaryship of State--in other words, the Fore
do earnestly recommend to the people, and especially to all ministers and teachers of religion, of all denominations, to all heads of families, to observe and keep that day according to their several creeds and modes of worship, in all humility, and with all religious solemnity, to the end that the united prayer of the nation may ascend to the Throne of Grace and bring down plentiful blessings upon our own country. In testimony whereof, &c., Abraham Lincoln. By the President: W. H. Seward, Secretary of State. Surely, "the devil can cite Scripture for his purpose." A Northern Journal changes its tone. The New Bedford (Mass.) Mercury, hitherto one of the most rabid war journals, has changed its tone of late. In the last issue come to hand the editor remarks: It cannot be denied that we are disappointed at the formidable aspect the rebellion has assumed. We thought to have suppressed it in a few weeks, and supposed the South would yield at once before the e
ncipally intended to check the communication of disloyal persons with Europe, consequently passports will not be required by ordinary travelers on the lines of railroads from the United States which enter the British possessions. If, however, in any special case the transit of a person should be objected to by the agents of this Government on the borders, the agent will cause such person to be detained until communication can be had with the Department in regard to the case. (Signed) "W. H. Seward, "Secretary of State." By an order issued from the Adjutant General's office, from this time until the first of January, 1863, recruiting officers are directed to make all their enlistments of men entering the regular army for the term of three years. The minimum standard of height for recruits is fixed at five feet three inches. According to Order No. 63, Captain Beverly H. Robertson, of the Second Cavalry, and First Lieutenant W. T. Walker, of the Ordnance Department, ha
Seward and Lincoln. --The official prominence of Lincoln shelters Seward from his just proportion of the responsibility and odium of the present war. It is not Seward from his just proportion of the responsibility and odium of the present war. It is not more true that the Premier of England is its real King than that Seward is the actual President of the United States. Lincoln, the obscure Illinois pettifogger, is tSeward is the actual President of the United States. Lincoln, the obscure Illinois pettifogger, is the nominal chief magistrate, but the real master of the Northern nation is W. H. Seward. The ignorant and incompetent rail-splitter would no more take a single imporW. H. Seward. The ignorant and incompetent rail-splitter would no more take a single important step without the advice and concurrence of his Secretary of State than he would accompany Gen. M. Clellan to the next battle of the Potomac. The President himsey no means as bad or black hearted a man as his Prime Minister. Those who know Seward epresent him as a cold blooded monster, one of the most malignant and wolfish oen, and its violation of the laws of justice, honor, and humanity, is due to W. H. Seward, the arch-fiend of the Northern despotism, who, if he had a hundred thousand
r character. Mrs. Greenhow's letter is ingenuous, womanly, and courageous. She is a true woman, a true Virginia woman, and the blood of every man must boil when he reads the narrative of indignities offered to her sex in Washington. The account she gives needs no confirmation; but we have heard, through private and reliable sources, of the grossest and most systematic insults offered to the captive ladies in Washington by their brutal persecutors.--We anticipate no favorable response from Seward to this noble and affecting letter. He has not the courage to make war upon any but the weak and helpless, and such natures never relax their hold upon a victim, when they can display their ferocity without danger of retaliation. There is not a gentleman in Lincoln's cabinet, not one who has the feelings of a man, or such treatment to woman could never occur in the very capital of the nation. We have never known the tendency of the oldNational Intelligencer to obsequiousness to man in pow
entors thereof chuckle in their sleeves and boast that they have sold somebody. Yesterday and last night the class of persons alluded to started the absurd report that there had been a row in the Cabinet, and that the quarrel was chiefly between Seward and Cameron; that the former announced his intention to resign if Cameron's report was not changed, and that Cameron swore he would resign if it was; and, finally, that it was agreed that it should be partially altered; that Cameron submitted gra successfully emancipated from celestial allegiance the inhabitants of the Garden of Eden. They grin a little, too, at the chance of evil happening to the venerable Archbishop, whom they hate on account of his supposed affiliation with Secretary of State Seward. Now our opinion is that Government ought to lose no time in dispatching steamers in search of the Nashville, and not rest until that vessel is safely docked in some Northern harbor, and incapable of such acts of piracy as the Tribune
liter and country attorney, and to place what it calls its liberals at his august disposal. No country furnishes so many examples as England of great men who have risen from humble beginnings. But it would have been impossible for him or any of his Cabinet to have emerged, under British institutions, from the mediocrity to which nature had condemned them, and from which pure democracy alone was capable of rescuing them. Are the best Americans willing to accept Mr. Abraham Lincoln and Mr. W. H. Seward as their best men? If not, can they substitute better men? If they cannot, what other proof is needed of the inefficacy of their boasted institutions? An imbecile Executive above, a restless, purposeless multitude below, linked together like a kite tied to a balloon, and drifting at the mercy of the air currents, while respectability, moderation and sense are pushed aside, or dragged helplessly along — such is the spectacle presented in the first storm by the model Republic. A galla
The Daily Dispatch: August 1, 1862., [Electronic resource], The right of free speech Vindicated in Massachusetts. (search)
et are we prosecuted! What Mr. Sennott Thinks of Secretary Seward. Have we arrived at such a state that no one mustsir? Can not example, have the misfortune to think that Mr Seward, our present Secretary of State, is not fit as a statesmaas they will be, and cannot help rejoicing to think that Mr. Seward will probably be the last of the Lilliputians. An Illustration — Seward and Sumner. Again, I do not worship Mr. Sumner. I cannot admire a person who is so simple as to thhat I never looked at those pictures without thinking of Mr. Seward and of Mr. Sumner? and that I never hear the names of MMr. Seward or of Mr. Sumner without thinking of the picture of the Fox and of the picture of the Gander? Such of the imbnd more, and say nothing or else be shut up by order of W. H. Seward, I want to know, seriously and calmly, what shall I rig I fight Jeff. Davis for? What worse can he do to me than Seward or Stanton have done already? What, indeed — when their w
W. H. Seward. Although the report is not confirmed that Seward is to be sent on a foreign mission, that day of honorable banishment may not be far distant. We have no doubt he is anxious to hide his head in some foreign land, and escape the tempest which will ere long be howling over the North for the author of the war. He is the man, he, Wm. H. Seward, pre- eminently the man who fired "the Ephesian dome" of the old American Union, and whose name will be immortal in the hate and execration of his countrymen. There were causes at work in the antagonistic institutions, interests, and habits of the people, which rendered ultimate dissolution evitable; but, if there had been no such man as Wm. H. Seward, this generation at least might have died in its bed in peace. A hundred and fifty thousand of Seward's countrymen, whose bones now bleach the soil they came to desecrate, might be dwelling in contented homes, and hundreds of thousands more, whom he is training for the same interna
of this tremendous American revolution for themselves." Discussing the conflicting statements of Seward and Mercier, relative to the latter's mission to Richmond, the Times regrets Seward's denial of Seward's denial of the humane act impaled to him by Mercier, which would reflect credit on him, and, at the expense of Mr. Seward's veracity, expresses the belief that Seward did listen to Mercier's counsels. The LMr. Seward's veracity, expresses the belief that Seward did listen to Mercier's counsels. The London Globe thinks it the duty of either France or the United States to demand an apology for the contradiction existing between Seward and Mercier. The Kangaroo, from Liverpool, arrived on the 1Seward did listen to Mercier's counsels. The London Globe thinks it the duty of either France or the United States to demand an apology for the contradiction existing between Seward and Mercier. The Kangaroo, from Liverpool, arrived on the 11th and brought 825 bales of cotton. The City of Baltimore brought 369 bales. Mr. Alexander Ramsay appeared and was sworn in as U. S. Senator from Minnesota on Thursday. An engagement betweSeward and Mercier. The Kangaroo, from Liverpool, arrived on the 11th and brought 825 bales of cotton. The City of Baltimore brought 369 bales. Mr. Alexander Ramsay appeared and was sworn in as U. S. Senator from Minnesota on Thursday. An engagement between Russians and Polish insurgents is reported, lasting eight hours. The Russians were defeated and fled, and took refuge on Prussian territory. In Liverpool American cotton advanced ¼ to ½ penny,
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