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ars. A caucus of Southern members was held on Saturday evening, December 8th; but it only served to develop more clearly the broad line of demarkation between the Unionists and the Disunionists. Messrs. Albert G. Brown, of Mississippi, and John Slidell, of Louisiana, were among the most fierce for Secession. Messrs. Jefferson Davis, of Mississippi, and James M. Mason, of Virginia, favored further efforts, or, at least, further waiting, for conciliation. Messrs. Crittenden, Bayard, and seveGwin, Hunter, Johnson, of Tennessee, Kennedy, Lane, of Oregon, Mason, Nicholson, Pearce, Polk, Powell, Pugh, Rice, Saulsbury, and Sebastian-23 [all Democrats, but two Bell-Conservatives, in italics]. Messrs. Iverson, of Georgia, Benjamin and Slidell, of Louisiana, Hemphill and Wigfall, of Texas, and R. W. Johnson, of Arkansas--who had voted just before against taking up the Kansas bill-had now absented themselves or sat silent, and allowed Mr. Clark's resolves to supplant Mr. Crittenden's,
r Hollins's Ram exploit Dupont and Sherman's expedition capture of Port Royal the Trent case surrender of Mason and Slidell. on Sunday, June 2d, 1861, while the Minnesota, then blockading the harbor of Charleston, was looking after a suspicileston harbor during the night of Oct. 12th, conveying James M. Mason, of Va., Confederate Envoy to Great Britain, and John Slidell, of La., likewise accredited to France. The Theodora duly reached Cardenas, Cuba; whence her official passengers repareason. Lieut. Fairfax, with a boat's crew, immediately boarded her in quest of the Embassadors; when Messrs. Mason and Slidell, with their Secretaries, Eustis and McFarland, were compelled to change their vessel and their destination. Their familptory demand was promptly made, through her Embassador, Lord Lyons, for the unconditional surrender of Messrs. Mason and Slidell and their secretaries. France seconded and supported the requirement of Great Britain, in a considerate and courteous d
e, which employment for body and mind would readily have repelled and dissipated. Is this obstinate fixity, this rooted neglect and waste of the grandest opportunities, explicable? Not by the hypothesis of a constitutional aversion to the shedding of blood — that is, of other men's — on the part of our Young Napoleon; for he was at that moment among the most eager to have our country involved in still another great war, by a refusal, on the part of our Government, to surrender Mason and Slidell. Not even Vallandigham was more belligerent in that direction. Constitutional timidity and irresolution — an overwhelming sense of responsibility and inadequacy to so stupendous a trust — were probably not without their influence in the premises. But, beyond and above all these, there was doubtless a slowly awakened consciousness that Slavery was the real assailant of our National existence, and that to put down the Rebellion by a positive, determined exertion of force, was to seal the
use, 555. Eustis, captured, with Mason and Slidell, 606. Evans, Robt. J., letter to, from Jod by England in the War of 112, 60; Mason and Slidell, 606: extract from the Prince Regent's Manifedemands and receives the persons of Mason and Slidell, 608. Greble, Lt. John T., killed at Great; 152; 353. Lyons, Lord, demands Mason and Slidell, 608. Lyon, Robert, of S. C., to a friend al., 571. MacFARLANDarland, with Mason and Slidell, 606. McIntosh, Francis J., burnt by a mobof, 150. San Jacinto, the, takes Mason and Slidell, 666. Santa Fe, expedition from Texas to, mer, Lieut., holds Fort Pickens, 412; 601. Slidell, John, of La., 373; taken by Capt. Wilkes, 60-3 ; 396. Theodora, the, conveys Mason and Slidell, 606. Thomas, Adjutant Gen., accompanies G cooperation, 313-4. Trent, the, Mason and Slidell abstracted from, 606; Secretary Welles on thet, 615-16. Wilkes, Capt., seizes Mason and Slidell, 606-7. Wilkesbarre, Pa., fugitive-slave c
outh coast of Cuba. There I learned that Messrs. Slidell and Mason had landed on Cuba, and had reanes to go out of the cabin, which they did, Mr. Slidell at the same time jumping out of a window ofcabin, saw Mr. Fairfax endeavoring to enter Mr. Slidell's room, which was then prevented in a measu at Mr. Slidell's room. After a short time Mr. Slidell came from his room through a side window. the latter said that two gentlemen (naming Mr. Slidell and Mr. Mason) were known to be on board, ad being present, the lieutenant, addressing Mr. Slidell, and afterward Mr. Mason, repeating that hithe whole proceeding as a piratical act. Mr. Slidell and Mr. Mason, together with Mr. Eustis andr names, position, and intended movements. Mr. Slidell, the commissioner for Paris, was accompanie heart-rending scene now took place between Mr. Slidell, his eldest daughter, a noble girl devoted n days before. ( Disgraceful, and Bravo for Miss Slidell. ) No words of mine shall pass my lips on a[60 more...]
ited States, did, on the 8th of November, 1861, on the high seas, intercept the Trent, a British mail steamer, and forcibly remove therefrom James M. Mason and John Slidell, disloyal citizens, leading conspirators, rebel enemies and dangerous men, who, with their suite, were on their way to Europe to promote the cause of the insur did propose to tender the thanks of Congress to Captain Wilkes for his brave, adroit, and patriotic conduct, in the arrest of the traitors, James M. Mason and John Slidell; and Whereas further, on the same day, this House did request the President to confine the said Janes M. Mason and John Slidell in the cells of convicted feJohn Slidell in the cells of convicted felons until certain military officers of the United States, captured and held by the so-called Confederate States, should be treated as prisoners of war; therefore, be it Resolved, As the sense of this House, that it is the duty of the President to now firmly maintain the stand thus taken, approving and adopting the act of Capta
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Engagements of the Civil War with losses on both sides December, 1860-August, 1862 (search)
I killed, 8 wounded. Confed. 3 wounded. November 7, 1861: Port Royal, S. C. Capture of Fort Beauregard and Fort Walker (Confederate). Union, Du Pont's fleet, 17 vessels, and 3 brigades of land forces under Gen. Thomas W. Sherman. Confed., 3 vessels under Flag-officer Josiah Tattnall, and 1 brigade of land forces under Gen. Thomas F. Drayton. Losses: Union 8 killed, 23 wounded. Confed. 11 killed, 48 wounded, 7 missing. November 8, 1861: seizure of Jas. M. Mason and John Slidell, Confed. Commissioners to Europe on board of British steamer Trent, by U. S. steamer San Jacinto. November 9, 1861: Piketown or Ivy Mountain, Ky. Union, 33d Ohio and Col. Metcalf's Ky. Vols. Confed., Col. J. S. Williams' command. Losses: Union 6 killed, 24 wounded. Confed. 18 killed, 45 wounded, 200 captured. November 10, 1861: Guyandotte, W. Va. Union, 9th Va. Vols. Confed., Jenkins' Cav. Losses: Union 7 killed, 20 wounded. Confed. 3 killed, 10 woun
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The blockade (search)
n command of the steam frigate Susquehanna, he formed an active part of Admiral Du Pont's circle of fire at Port Royal, November 7, 1861. In 1862-3 he was in command of the East Gulf blockading squadron and in 1864 of the West Indian squadron. Rear-Admiral Charles Wilkes, U. S. N. A nephew of the celebrated John Wilkes of London, this officer in 1838-42 led the exploring expedition that discovered the Antarctic continent. In 1861 he obtained fame of another kind by seizing Mason and Slidell aboard the British steamer Trent and conveying them to Boston in his ship, the San Jacinto. He had been cruising in the West Indies, looking for the Confederate cruiser Sumter, and seized the opportunity for what appeared to be bigger game. Wilkes was thanked by Congress and applauded by the people of the North, but his act nearly brought on a war with England. On August 28, 1862, in command of a flotilla, he destroyed City Point, which was later to become the army base in the closing op
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The Confederate cruisers and the Alabama : the Confederate destroyers of commerce (search)
contending forces abroad The names of Mason and Slidell were linked throughout the war with the diplomatic largest on the seas. Actively opposed to Mason and Slidell was John Bigelow, consul at Paris for the Federal Gharles Wilkes, in the San Jacinto, seized Mason and Slidell aboard the British steamer Trent, Nov. 8, 1861. Haould scarcely have been prevented. While Mason and Slidell were paving the way with diplomacy, a commission ofing of five blockade-runners. A. P. Mason John Slidell John Bigelow Capt. James N. Maffit, C. S. Nss, but the blow to its prospects was severe. John Slidell, the commissioner in France, finally got six warssion of the necessary funds, Captain Bulloch and Mr. Slidell arranged with M. Arman, who was a member of the Cx, for the construction of ironclad ships of war. Mr. Slidell had already received assurances from persons in tlled to revoke the guarantee that had been given to Slidell and Bulloch. A plan was arranged, however, by whic
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
. frigate Santee, off Galveston, Texas, surprised and cut out the Confed. privateer Royal Yacht. November 8, 1861. Capt. Chas. Wilkes, commanding U. S. screw sloop San Jacinto, removed by force Confed. Commissioners Jas. M. Mason and John Slidell from British mail steamer Trent. November 18, 1861. U. S. gunboat Conestoga engaged Confed. batteries on the Tennessee River, and silenced them. November 19, 1861. The ship Harvey Birch was captured and burnt in the English Cherates had fitted up for a gunboat. Capture of the town of Biloxi, Miss., by U. S. gunboats Lewis, Water Witch, and New London, with Federal forces from Ship Island. January, 1862. January 1, 1862. Confed. Commissioners Mason and Slidell left Boston for England via Provincetown, Mass., where the British war steamer Rinaldo received them. January 12, 1862. Expedition sailed from Fort Monroe under command of Flag-Officer Golds-borough and Gen. Burnside, for Albemarle Sound
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