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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate cause and its defenders. (search)
, will grow brighter and brighter, as the years roll on, because no stain of crime or vandalism is linked to those names; and because those men have performed deeds which deserve to live in history. And what shall I say of the men who followed these leaders? I will say this, without the slightest fear of contradiction from any source: They were the most unselfish and devoted patriots that ever marched to the tap of the drum, or stood on the bloody front of battle. The northern historian, Swinton, speaks of them as the incomparable infantry of the Army of Northern Virginia. Colonel Dodge, a distinguished Federal officer, in his lecture on Chancellorsville, before the Lowell Institute in Boston, says: The morale of the Confederate army could not have been finer. * * * Perhaps no infantry was ever, in its peculiar way, more permeated with the instinct of pure fighting—ever felt the gaudiam certaminis more than the Army of Northern Virginia. Another gallant Federal colonel th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard. (search)
and with the assistance of the artillery the pike was cleared of the enemy before the flanking column reached that point. Some 1,400 prisoners and five pieces of artillery were taken by the Confederates. The total Federal loss is stated by Swinton at 4,000. The Confederates' killed, wounded and missing was about 2,800. Bermuda Hundred. During the evening and night of the 16th Butler retreated upon Bermuda Hundred. On the 17th Ransom's Division was recalled to Richmond, and Beaureng almost to the severity of battles. After each he advanced and straightened his lines, until commencing at Howlett's, on the James, they ran in a line more or less direct to Ashton Creek, near its junction with the Appomattox. Butler, says Swinton, was now in a position where if he was secure against attack, he was also powerless for offensive operation against Richmond-being, as he himself said at the time, bottled up and hermetically sealed. And General Badeau in his military history
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
side of the Rappahannock, was whether first to push Jackson against Sedgwick on the plains where Burnside met his crushing defeat. But his consideration of this plan was brief, though Jackson favored it, and instead he seized his right wing, as Swinton says, In the grasp of a Titan, and hurled it in reverse, as an athlete might have slung a stone, over field and forest, upon the one vulnerable spot in the strong formation of his foe. Wary he was, but not cautious, as General Doubleday says, redoubled. True, the wonderful resources of his genius, the magnetic influence which tied men to him as with links of steel—the influence of his goodness as well as his greatness—and the elastic vitality of his army, Instinct to the last, says Swinton, with life and courage in every part—had sufficed so far to hold intact the works around Petersburg and Richmond, and to preserve insecure communication between these positions and their nearer bases of supplies; but in other sections of the cou<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The life and character of Robert Edward Lee. (search)
side of the Rappahannock, was whether first to push Jackson against Sedgwick on the plains where Burnside met his crushing defeat. But his consideration of this plan was brief, though Jackson favored it, and instead he seized his right wing, as Swinton says, In the grasp of a Titan, and hurled it in reverse, as an athlete might have slung a stone, over field and forest, upon the one vulnerable spot in the strong formation of his foe. Wary he was, but not cautious, as General Doubleday says, redoubled. True, the wonderful resources of his genius, the magnetic influence which tied men to him as with links of steel—the influence of his goodness as well as his greatness—and the elastic vitality of his army, Instinct to the last, says Swinton, with life and courage in every part—had sufficed so far to hold intact the works around Petersburg and Richmond, and to preserve insecure communication between these positions and their nearer bases of supplies; but in other sections of the cou<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate Generals are all passing away. (search)
eral A. L. Long, General E. P. Alexander, General J. B. Hood, General Henry Heth and others, and in the official reports of nearly all of the prominent officers engaged. Meantime, it ought to be said that the charge, so freely made, that the censure of General Longstreet originated with those who opposed his political course, is utterly unsustained by the facts. The charge that Lee lost the battle of Gettysburg by obstinately refusing to take Longstreet's advice was first published by Swinton, in his book, Army of the Potomac, which appeared in 1866, and the author gave General Longstreet as his authority for his statements. Soon after General Lee's death, there was published in the papers (presumably by General Longstreet's authority), a letter written soon after the battle of Gettysburg by General Longstreet to his uncle, in which he clearly makes the charge against Lee, and intimates that if he (Longstreet) had been in command victory, instead of failure, would have resulte
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.46 (search)
a favorable ridge which commanded the road and opened on the Federal position, but there was no response. There was absolutely no desire on the part of the Federals to pursue. General Breckinridge, who was assigned to the duty of covering the retreat, camped at a point not over four miles from Pittsburg Landing. Shiloh was one of the bloodiest battles in history. General Beauregard officially stated his loss at 1,720 killed, 8,012 wounded and 959 missing, an aggregate of 10,699. Swinton places the Federal loss at 15,000, making the combined losses over 25,000. Tuesday afternoon, Colonel Forrest, with two companies of his regiment, was acting as rear guard, when suddenly a force of the enemy advanced in three lines of battle. About this time Captain Isaac Harrison, with his company from Wirt Adams' Regiment, and two companies of the 8th Texas, and a company of Kentuckians, under Captain John Morgan, opportunely came up, making Forrest's force about 350 strong. There
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The crisis of the Confederacy (search)
ing proof—if more were needed, for history is full of it—that brains, education and pluck are of more avail in war than mere numbers. Studying the subject only in his closet, necessarily without practical experience in war—for England has had none of any consequence since the Crimean—it is but natural that the author should have fallen into some errors. His opinion that Grant was great in strategy, but not strong in tactics, is exactly the reverse of the view taken in America. I think Swinton, the historian of the Army of the Potomac, characterizes Grant's repeated frontal attacks during the Overland campaign—notably at Cold Harbor—as a reductio ad absurdum in hammering. The recoil of the hammer was vastly more destructive than the blow. In estimating the numerical strength of the opposed armies, and their losses in battle, Captain Battine certainly often errs, making the odds against the Confederates less than they in fact were, and their losses greater. For instance,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Lee at Gettysburg. (search)
cticable. Whatever was to be the result, the battle was now joined. There was no retreat without an engagement. Instead of the defensive, as he had planned, General Lee was compelled to take the offensive, and himself endeavor to force the enemy away. It was not by the choice of Lee nor by the foresight of Meade that the Federal army found itself placed on lines of magnificent defence. Just east of the little town, across a narrow valley, there lay on the ground a great fish-hook, as Swinton first and aptly called it, a fish-hook of rocky ridge and rugged hills. The lower convex curve of the hook was the Cemetery hill opposite the town. To the northeast the ridge curved back to the barb of the hook, the rocky sides of Culp's hill, and to the south and east the long shank lay across the country for several miles to find its head in the double Round Top. Two main roads from the east came within the hook on their way to Gettysburg, the Baltimore and the Tarrytown roads, and alo
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 8 (search)
h the most fantastic descriptions on the part of a crowd of eye-witnesses whose judgment and vision had been singularly affected by the excitement of the combat so novel to them. It would be impossible to unravel the truth from among so many contradictory assertions if we had not as guides the official reports of both parties, remarkable for their completeness and the manner in which they agree with each other. This labor has been facilitated for us by the works of two American writers, Mr. Swinton, who has written two accounts of the battle of Bull Run with his wonted sagacity, and Mr. Lossing, the prolific draughtsman and scrupulous narrator. Finally, the author himself accompanied McDowell a few months after the battle, when the latter visited for the first time since the action the scene of his defeat; and he thus received on the spot, from the mouth of the principal actors, who recognized, with emotions easy to understand, here the route on which they had at first been victo
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Bibliographical note (search)
first commends itself to our special consideration on account of the conscientious impartiality with which it was written; the others, by the judicious care with which their respective authors made use of the published and unpublished documents they had on hand. These are, The Illustrated History of the War, by Mr. Lossing; The American Civil War, three volumes; Life of General Grant, by his former aid-de-camp, General Badeau, of which only the first volume has appeared; the two books of Mr. Swinton, entitled, respectively, History of the Army of the Potomac, one volume, and The Twelve Decisive Battles of the War, one volume. To continue the list of works written from a Union point of view, we will mention, without attempting to classify them, History of the Rebellion, by Appleton, one volume; Life of General Grant, by Coppee, one volume; Life of General Sherman, by Bowman and Irwin, one volume; Thirteen Months in the Rebel Army, by Stevenson, one volume; The Volunteer Quartermast
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