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From Tampa Bay. --The latest Tampa (Fla.) Peninsular has the following: It is now satisfactorily ascertained that the steamer Salvor, whose detention in Key West was noticed in last week's issue, has, with the negro crew which was on board, been seized by the Federal authorities at that place, and sent to Fort Pickens. The smack W. A. Wilbur, which arrived from Key West on the 25th inst., has been temporarily detained by Capt. Lesley, of the Sunny South Guards. She is now lyio Fort Pickens. The smack W. A. Wilbur, which arrived from Key West on the 25th inst., has been temporarily detained by Capt. Lesley, of the Sunny South Guards. She is now lying in our port, under a guard of eight men. We do not deem it prudent, just now, to mention the cause of her detention. Intelligence was received at this place, on Monday last, that the steamer Cuyler and the cutter John Appleton, had been cruising about Egmont Key, at the entrance to Tampa Bay, for two days.
r Seaford Del., by way of the Nanticoke river, where we understand, they made some arrests on Sunday night. The capture of the Salvor. The Key West correspondent of the New York Tribune, writing under date of the 20th inst., has the following particulars of the capture of the steamer Salvor, whose arrival in Philadelphia we noticed yesterday: The Salvor was discovered at 11 o'clock P. M., heading for the Quicksands, and steering due North, her evident intention being to enter Tampa Bay, a port from which she had been sailing for some months before the war Capt. Scott sent an officer on board with orders to bring her to. Finding her papers irregular, she was taken possession of and towed into this port, arriving at an early hour on Monday morning. Maj. French, accompanied by Capt. Scott and the U. S. Marshal, went on board the Salvor as soon as she cast anchor. The Marshal, at the request of Capt. Scott, sent for his deputy and an assistant, and commenced a thorough
The Daily Dispatch: December 17, 1861., [Electronic resource], A "Battle-Flag" for the Powhatan Troop. (search)
r assistance, and yet would not. I pledge myself to you that this is no false alarm, and all who know me will believe me. Solon Borland, Col. Commandant South Florida coast operations — capture of Yankees and Fishing smacks. A Tampa Bay correspondent writes to the Tallahassee Floridian: Major W. L. L. Bowen, commanding at Tampa, some weeks ago, determined to break up the nefarious trade and communication that have been going on ever since the war began, between our Southern coast and the U. S. authorities at Key West. To this end he chartered the little steamer Scottish Chief, and went in search of the fishing tribe. Armed with a 6-pounder, he soon secured a fine fishing smack and brought her into Tampa Bay; but without going up to town he transferred his armament from the steamer to the smack and went out again, and, without indulging in a lengthy story, he has captured twelve sail, nine smacks and three schooners, and effectually broke up the infamous traff
The Daily Dispatch: November 7, 1862., [Electronic resource], Interesting Narrative of the Escape of Hurlbut from Richmond. (search)
Bombardment of Tampa Bay. Augusta, Nov. 6. --The Savannah Republican, of this morning, learns through private letters that the Abolitionists were bombarding Tampa Bay, Fla., on the 3d. Our forces were confident of their ability to hold out. Bombardment of Tampa Bay. Augusta, Nov. 6. --The Savannah Republican, of this morning, learns through private letters that the Abolitionists were bombarding Tampa Bay, Fla., on the 3d. Our forces were confident of their ability to hold out.
What is to be Settled for. --The Yankees have made the use of the torch legitimate against them by the burning of the following towns: Germantown and Madison Courthouse, in Virginia; Washington, North Carolina; Bluffton, South Carolina; Darien and St. Mary's, Georgia; Jacksonville and Tampa Bay, Florida; Jackson, Mississippi; Greenville, and other towns in Arkansas; Alexandria and New Iberia, Louisiana; Hickman, Randolph, Lake Providence, Bayon Sara, Plaquemine, Donaldsonville, and every other town on the Mississippi river, from the mouth of the Ohio to New Orleans, except Memphis, Natchez, Vicksburg and Baton Rouge.
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