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nth alarming telegrams from Generals Hardee, Taylor, Cobb, and Wheeler were received by him relative to Sherman's advance on Macon. He determined to leave at once for that locality, and telegraphed General Hood to take the offensive at once, in order to destroy or capture the Federal forces in Middle Tennessee, and compel Sherman to return to Kentucky, even should he have already reached the coast. General Beauregard arrived at Macon on the 24th, after many annoying delays at Meridian, Demopolis, Selma, and Montgomery, and had a long and important conference with Generals Cobb and Taylor. The latter had been ordered to Macon, to assist Generals Cobb and Hardee in the defence of Georgia. He was an officer of acknowledged merit, though not educated as a soldier, and could be relied upon whenever judgment and firmness were requisite. General Hardee, who appreciated these qualities in General Taylor, had urgently solicited his presence at Savannah, to aid in preparing for Sherman's
our pickets this side of Calhoun. Howell Cobb, Major-Genl. Telegram. Macon, April 7th, 1865. Genl. G. T. Beauregard: From Montgomery General Buford reports Commodore J. E. Montgomery just arrived at Greenville. Reports he left Demopolis Monday, and crossed Alabama River Tuesday; that General Jackson whipped the enemy, three thousand (3000) strong, that, moved from Tuscaloosa River, six (6) miles from Selma; the enemy retreated. Enemy's main column reported moving towards Demopolis. Howell Cobb. Telegram. fifteen miles East of Henry Court-House, via Greensboroa, April 8th, 1865. Genl. G. T. Beauregard: At dark to-night the enemy was still in Henry Court-house. During the day he was reinforced by about eight hundred (800). They tell citizens that they will advance on Danville in the morning; as yet no buildings have been burned in town. J. T. Wheeler, Col. Telegram. twelve miles East of Henry Court-House, via Greensboroa, April 8th, 186
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
15-16. Pursuit of Hood to the Tennessee River December 17-28. West Harpeth River December 17. Spring Hill December 18. Rutherford Creek December 19. Columbia December 20. Linnville, Buford's Station and Richland Creek, December 24. Anthony's Gap, near Pulaski, December 25. March to Gravelly Springs, Ala., and duty there till February, 1865, and at Eastport, Miss., till July. Moved to Nashville, Tenn., thence to Decatur and Montgomery, Ala., July 3-25. Duty at Demopolis, Montgomery, Opelika and Tuskegee, Ala., till November. Mustered out at Selma, Ala., November 5, and discharged at Springfield, Ills., November 20, 1865. Regiment lost during service 5 Officers and 60 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 8 Officers and 328 Enlisted men by disease. Total 401. 7th Illinois Regiment Cavalry Organized at Camp Butler, Ills., and mustered in October 13, 1861. Companies A, C, G and I ordered to Bird's Point, Mo., October 30, 1861. Rest
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Minnesota Volunteers. (search)
-30. Battle of Nashville December 15-16. Pursuit of Hood to the Tennessee River December 17-28. Moved to Eastport, Miss., and duty there till February, 1865. Moved to New Orleans, La., February 6-22. Campaign against Mobile, Ala., and its Defenses March 7-April 12. Siege of Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely March 26-April 8. Assault and capture of Fort Blakely April 9. Occupation of Mobile April 12. March to Montgomery April 13-25. Duty at Montgomery, Selma and Demopolis, Ala., till August. Mustered out September 6, 1865. Regiment lost during service 4 Officers and 86 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 4 Officers and 175 Enlisted men by disease. Total 269. 6th Minnesota Regiment Infantry. Organized at Camp Release and Fort Snelling, Minn., September 29 to November 20, 1862. Campaign against the Sioux Indians in Minnesota August 20 to November 14, 1862. Sibley's march to relief of Fort Ridgly August 24-28. Engagement at Birch Co
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Missouri Volunteers. (search)
its Defenses March 19-April 12. Siege of Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely March 26-April 8. Assault and capture of Fort Blakely April 9. Occupation of Mobile April 12. March to Montgomery April 13-25, thence to Selma May 10-14, and to Demopolis May 18-19. Duty there till July 15. Duty by Detachments at Tuscaloosa, Marion, Greensboro and Uniontown till October. At Demopolis till December 24. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., December 24-25. Mustered out January 15, 1866. RegimDemopolis till December 24. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., December 24-25. Mustered out January 15, 1866. Regiment lost during service 6 Officers and 98 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 179 Enlisted men by disease. Total 285. 11th Missouri Regiment Enrolled Militia Infantry. Duty in Southwest Missouri at Jefferson City, California, Tipton, Syracuse, Sedalia, LaMine, Booneville, etc. Called into service September 25, 1864, to repel Price's invasion of Missouri. Relieved from active service October 31, 1864. 11th Missouri Regiment Provisional Enrolled Militia Infantry
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Wisconsin Volunteers. (search)
Hood to the Tennessee River December 17-28. Moved to Clifton, Tenn., thence to Eastport, Miss., and duty there till February, 1865. Moved to New Orleans, La., February 6-19. Campaign against Mobile and its Defenses March 17-April 12. Siege of Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely March 26-April 8. Assault and capture of Fort Blakely April 9. Occupation of Mobile April 12. March to Montgomery April 13-25. Duty at Montgomery and Uniontown till September. Mustered out at Demopolis, Ala., September 5, 1865. Regiment lost during service 6 Officers and 53 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 219 Enlisted men by disease. Total 280. 9th Wisconsin Regiment Infantry. Organized at Milwaukee, Wis., and mustered in October 26, 1861. Ordered to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, January 22, 1862. Attached to Dept. of Kansas to August, 1862. 1st Brigade, Dept. of Kansas, to October, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Army of the Frontier, Dept. of
aw in the hope of crossing the Warrior lower down, and breaking the railroad between Selma and Demopolis. Accordingly he abandoned Tuscaloosa, burned the bridge across the Black Warrior, and struck acticable, after executing my mission at Tuscaloosa, to destroy the railroad between Selma and Demopolis. From Judge Mudd, at Elyton, I learned that he had left Tuscaloosa on the twenty-eighth; thatrps, I determined to recross the Black Warrior, and, if possible, destroy the railroad between Demopolis and Meridian, as I had been verbally instructed to destroy it west of Selma, and about Uniontod moved at all, it was either south or east, as the movement west would have driven Forrest to Demopolis, cleared the country between Tuscaloosa and Marion, and enabled me to communicate beyond doubtt-General Richard Taylor, Commanding Confederate Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana, Demopolis or elsewhere. (Official) J. H. Wilson, Brevet Major-General. (Declined.) headquarters cavalr
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Appendix no. 2: the work of grace in other armies of the Confederacy. (search)
ert J. Harp, Superintendent: Dear Brother: In November I brought the supplies of the Association in my possession to Cherokee, Alabama, the nearest point of railroad transportation to our army, then at Florence, Alabama, preparing for the continuation of the fall campaign into Middle Tennessee. It was not practicable or advisable for me to carry supplies and follow the army, and the time was spent in distributing Heralds, hymn-books, and Testaments on the railroads from Selma to Demopolis, Alabama, and thence to Meridian and Corinth, Mississippi, and from Corinth to Cherokee, Alabama, and on the steamboats from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. I also furnished reading for the hospitals at Lauderdale Springs, Corinth and Iuka, Mississippi. I visited and preached twice for Patterson's Brigade of Roddy's Division of Cavalry. The officers and soldiers took much interest in preaching and were glad to be furnished with 500 copies of the Herald. I supplied a portion of Forrest's corp
advance his kingdom. The venerable Bishop Andrew, of the M. E. Church, South, went among the soldiers like a father among his children, and rejoiced in the privilege of preaching to them the Word of Life. Of a visit to the soldiers at Demopolis, Ala., most of whom were paroled prisoners from Vicksburg, and among whom were many of the gallant men who came from Missouri with Gen. Price, he says in a letter to the Southern Christian Advocate: On last Sabbath I visited Demopolis, wherDemopolis, where there are a good many soldiers, mostly paroled prisoners who were captured at Vicksburg. Most of these have been recently exchanged, and will, I suppose, soon be in the field again. On Sunday afternoon I preached in the camp of Gen. Cockerell's Missouri brigade to quite a large and attentive congregation. At the close I was requested by the chaplain, Rev. Bro. Howard, of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, to preach for them again on Monday morning at 9 o'clock, to which I consented, and
nfederate lines in North Georgia. the co-operating column of cavalry. Gen. Polk evacuates Meridian, and falls back to Demopolis. Forrest defeats the Federal cavalry. disastrous and disgraceful conclusion of Sherman's adventure. the Red River exlish his army firmly in the triangle formed by the Alabama and Tombigbee Rivers, and the railroad leading from Selma to Demopolis and Meridian. The immediate objects of the movement were to cut off Mobile from Johnston, who lay in front of Grant on force with Sherman at Meridian was the critical point of his plan, and it was thought would enable him to advance upon Demopolis and Selma. Gen. Polk's little army having been reinforced by two or three brigades from the Mobile garrison for the in no condition to give battle, being but half of Sherman's numbers; and, therefore, evacuated Meridian, and retired to Demopolis. Meanwhile Gen. Forrest, with not more than twenty-five hundred cavalry, had been detached to watch the movements of S
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