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ing the approaches to the city of Mobile. In April it was sent to establish a courier line to Demopolis. Before this could be done, the regiment took part in a disastrous fight at Claiborne. It bl The greater part of the men were disbanded, and the few who remained in arms were paroled at Demopolis. Col. Henry Maury was disabled by a wound just before the close of the war. He was detained i Adams, April 8th. (1226) Ordered to guard river above Choctaw, and establish courier line to Demopolis, April 11th. (1228) Has been ordered to cross from Claiborne, scout river and open communications with Demopolis, April 12th. (1230-1232) Ordered to remain on west bank of Alabama river, April 12th. (1242) Couriers report defeat of Maury's command near Claiborne, April 15th. (1250) Capt. gade, department of the Gulf, September 3, 1864. No. 104—(1261) Mentioned by Col. S. Jones, Demopolis, Ala., April 24, 1865; asks for couriers. Capt. H. R. Gordon's Company. Vol. XX, Part
Under Lieut. A. P. St. John, at Deer creek, March 25, 1863. No. 37—(327) In General Moore's brigade, July 4, 1863, Vicksburg. (369) Four killed and 7 wounded, Vicksburg siege. (381) Mentioned by General Moore. No. 38—(613) In Maury's brigade, district of Louisiana, January 31, 1863. (704) In Maury's division, April 17th, Snyder's Bluff. (725) Mentioned by Col. E. W. Pettus, April 8th. (871, 872) Mentioned by Gen. J. H. Forney, Vicksburg, May 13th. (1060) In General Forney's division, Demopolis, March 14, 1864. No. 55—(663) Assigned to reserve artillery, November 19, 1863. Fowler's (Phelan's) battery. Fowler's battery, Capt. W. H. Fowler, was organized in Tuscaloosa in January, 1862, and was composed of men who had served in Virginia as a company in the regiment recruited by R. E. Rodes. It was the first organization to re-enlist for the war, and after serving at Mobile one year, joined the army at Tullahoma as part of Walthall's brigade. It fought at Chick
my which Sherman took out to meet Johnston. The letter above referred to bears date June 15, 1863, and says: A portion of the Ninth army corps, about 8,000 strong, has now arrived, and will take position, etc. All this shows that it is no unreasonable assertion to say that Grant had 100,000 men in the siege at Vicksburg. The parole lists indicated 29,491 men in the Vicksburg lines, of whom 23,233 were privates. Of these 3,084 were paroled in hospital. The men were marched out after being provisioned, and it was at once apparent by their painful and tedious progress that they could not have escaped from the siege. They were taken to Demopolis and there went into camp as paroled prisoners under charge of their own provost marshals. Port Hudson, La., had been invested May 24th and surrendered July 8th, and now the whole course of the Mississippi was in the hands of the United States, except such occasional attacks as steamers might expect in passing through a hostile country.
was commanded by Col. Lawrence S. Ross. Small commands were stationed at the military posts of Cahaba, under Col. H. C. Davis; Columbus, under General Ruggles; Demopolis, under Col. Nathaniel Wickliffe, and at Selma, under Col. T. H. Rosser. In this statement the command which Forrest was organizing at Cosmo is not included. Heant advance of the enemy in line of battle. The enemy occupied Meridian on the 14th, and Polk fell back with the small command of infantry at his disposal to Demopolis, Ala., putting General Lee in command of all cavalry in Mississippi, with orders to communicate with General Forrest. Sooy Smith's cavalry expedition made a fatama cavalry, there were present for duty in June in round numbers 650 officers and 7,200 men; in Wirt Adams' division, 360 officers and 4,200 men. At the posts of Demopolis, Meridian and Selma were about 1,900 more. The effective total for the department was reported at a trifle over 13,000; aggregate present, 16,000. Artillery, 1
issippi regiments of infantry. He was in Gen. J. E. Johnston's campaign for the relief of Vicksburg, in the fighting around Jackson, Miss., and afterward served under Polk in that State and marched with that general from Meridian, Miss., to Demopolis, Ala., thence to Rome, Ga., and forward to Resaca, where he joined the army of Tennessee. He served with distinction in the various battles of the campaign from Dalton to Atlanta, he and his gallant brigade winning fresh laurels in the fierce baJoseph Wheeler and W. T. Martin. Early in February, 1864, he obtained leave of absence from this field with authority to ask for transfer to the command of Gen. S. D. Lee. On March 5th he was ordered to report to Lieutenant-General Polk at Demopolis, Ala., and was soon under the orders of Lee, who named him as deserving of promotion to major-general and becoming his own successor in division command. On April 4th he was assigned to the Mississippi brigade of W. H. Jackson's division, consist
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
for a number of months. On the 24th of August the battery was attached to Preston's battalion of reserve artillery, and on the 5th of September, ordered to Demopolis, Alabama, for repairs. In new uniforms, well dressed, well drilled, and well equipped, on the 12th of October the battery took part in a review had for General JoGeneral Hardee, who told him he had nothing to do with the section; but at the same time instructed Colonel Wickliffe, by telegraph, not to let the section leave Demopolis, as a battery had already been taken from his department, and he did not intend any other should leave. This information was received from Colonel Wickliffe, whconsolidate the two sections, and promote Lieutenant Ritter to Captain. On the return of Lieutenant Stillwell from Meridian, Miss., he met General Johnston in Demopolis, who expressed a desire to see the commander of the section that evening at Mrs. Whitfield's residence, where he was stopping. Ritter in company with Stillwell,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
for a number of months. On the 24th of August the battery was attached to Preston's battalion of reserve artillery, and on the 5th of September, ordered to Demopolis, Alabama, for repairs. In new uniforms, well dressed, well drilled, and well equipped, on the 12th of October the battery took part in a review had for General JoGeneral Hardee, who told him he had nothing to do with the section; but at the same time instructed Colonel Wickliffe, by telegraph, not to let the section leave Demopolis, as a battery had already been taken from his department, and he did not intend any other should leave. This information was received from Colonel Wickliffe, whconsolidate the two sections, and promote Lieutenant Ritter to Captain. On the return of Lieutenant Stillwell from Meridian, Miss., he met General Johnston in Demopolis, who expressed a desire to see the commander of the section that evening at Mrs. Whitfield's residence, where he was stopping. Ritter in company with Stillwell,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Joseph E. Johnston. (search)
o be poured out like water, if unto him it seemeth good. Of all trusts and talents this is the one to be wisely used, and in no wise abused. The policy of Johnston was not the step forward which would slide three steps back, but the step back which would find the strength to stride trebly forward. It was the drawing back of the ram's foot to strike with the horns. The movement from Dalton began on the 12th of May. Polk's advance under Loring, and Polk himself, reached Resaca from Demopolis, Ala., on the same day. French's division of the same army joined near Kingston several days later, and Quarles's brigade at New Hope church on the 26th. One may be permitted to believe that Johnston incurred as large risk as could be exacted of a soldier and a patriot when he left the whole protection of his rear to the expected arrival of this much-hurried reinforcement. The position taken at Resaca to meet the movement through Snake Creek Gap was made untenable in consequence of a similar
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Recollections of army life with General Lee. (search)
uth Carolina, being more remote, and naturally then a richer agricultural section, the people more thrifty, or, what is perhaps more to the point, being imbued with a greater degree of secession proclivities, and thereby more interested in maintaining an army, naturally showed more vim and thrift, even with the then shadowing clouds of dire disaster looming up on the horizon. In Georgia much push and stir was evidenced. Abundant crops greeted the eye, and all along the line of railway to Demopolis, on the Tombigbee, the same cheering features existed. On both banks of the Tombigbee vast heaps of corn, racked and cribbed, were to be seen. I wondered at the sight of so much provender for man and beast exposed to wind and weather, and rotting daily in the summer sun. These were neighborhood collections of tax in kind, a necessary feature of the Confederacy. These immense piles of corn, if speedily transported to the front, would have given new lease of life to our troops and restore
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sherman's expedition from Vicksburg to Meridian, Feb. 3, to March 6, 1864 [from the New Orleans, la., Picayune, July 27, 1904.] (search)
Tennessee to assist General Grant in his operations against the Confederate army under General Bragg. He returned to Memphis January 10, 1864, and began at once to prepare an army to go into Mississippi from Vicksburg as far as Meridian, or Demopolis, Ala. His first step was to order that the Memphis and Charleston Railroad be abandoned. He had a large force guarding the Mississippi river, one division at Natchez, McPherson's 17th Army Corps at Vicksburg, Hurlbut's 16th Army Corps at Memphis,ver an attempt was made by the cavalry to impede the march. On the 13th General Polk ordered General Lee to again get to the north of General Sherman's line of march, as he proposed to evacuate Meridian and march with his infantry towards Demopolis, Ala. The enemy arrived at Meridian at 3 P. M., February 14th, the Confederate cavalry retiring towards Marion station. On this date (February 14th) General Polk issued an order placing Major-General Stephen D. Lee in command of all the cavalry w
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