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Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Fannie A. Beers, Memories: a record of personal exeperience and adventure during four years of war. 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The actions with the forts (search)
an attack from the east, on account of the strength of the lines encircling the city on the west. Accordingly, he moved about thirty-two thousand men against Spanish Fort, on the bay shore at the mouth of the Apalachee River, seven miles due east of the city. The movement began on the 17th of March, and by the 8th of April the Federals had ninety guns in position and Spanish Fort closely invested, aided by as many of the The navy lost lieutenant Samuel W. Preston This brave and promising young officer was an ardent advocate of the effectiveness of land detachments of sailors and marines against forts. At Fort Fisher came the coveted opportunity at up within range. On the evening of the 8th, the Federal troops got a foothold in the works, and that night the garrison retreated. Fort Blakely, north of Spanish Fort on the Apalachee, and also blocking one of the passes into the city by water from the head of the bay, was invested by a column of thirteen thousand men from P
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
February, 1865. February 4, 1865. Lieut. Cushing with 4 boats and 50 men takes possession of All Saints Parish, on Little River, S. C., capturing a large amount of cotton. February 18, 1865. Charleston occupied by Union forces. March, 1865. March 4, 1865. U. S. transport steamer Thorne blown up by a torpedo in Cape Fear River. March 28-29, 1865. U. S. monitors Milwaukee and Osage sunk by torpedoes in Mobile Bay. April, 1865. April 8, 1865. Spanish Fort, Mobile, bombarded. The Confederates evacuate at night. April 12, 1865. Mobile occupied by Union forces. April 14, 1865. Anniversary of the capture of Fort Sumter celebrated, by imposing ceremonies at the fort, and replacing the flag by Gen. Anderson. April 22, 1865. Mississippi Squadron flagship Black Hawk burnt at Mound City. April 24, 1865. Confed. ram Webb escapes past the Union fleet on the Red River; is run ashore below New Orleans, deserted, and blo
he agricultural department of the university work. Thus destruction gave place to training for citizenship and service. As soon as General Taylor heard of the capitulation of General Joseph E. Johnston in North Carolina, he surrendered, on May 4, 1865, at Citronelle, Alabama, not far from Mobile, all the remaining forces of the Confederacy east of the Mississippi River to the Federal General E. R. S. Canby. Canby had advanced from Dauphine Island, at the entrance to Mobile Bay, to the Spanish Fort across from Mobile and had reduced it on April 8th, marching into the deserted works on the day that General Lee surrendered at Appomattox. At the same time, General Frederick Steele had advanced from Pensacola against Blakely, a little farther north than the Spanish Fort, and had captured it on the afternoon of Lee's surrender. On the morning of May 12th the Union forces under General Gordon Granger crossed the bay and found that the Confederate General Dabney H. Maury had marched out
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The defence of Mobile in 1865. (search)
e on Fish river was only twenty miles below Spanish Fort; that he occupied nine days in marching thas mistaken in saying we had Parrott guns in Spanish Fort. The only Parrott gun we had at that time hed from Fish river against the position of Spanish Fort. On March 25th information received throug, about two miles distant from the works of Spanish Fort. The troops ordered for this service were ience, and entirely devoted to their duty. Spanish Fort was garrisoned by Gibson s Louisiana brigade plank roak, and abandoned the position of Spanish Fort and its material to the enemy. He lost somack on the city. I consider the defence of Spanish Fort by General Gibson and the gentlemen of his Blakely was better for defence than that of Spanish Fort. The works consisted of nine lunettes conning Sunday, the day after the evacuation of Spanish Fort, the enemy was continually moving troops fro ironclads attempted to get near enough to Spanish Fort to take part in the bombardment. They both[15 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The concentration before Shiloh-reply to General Ruggles. (search)
for his troops, not the troops for the commander. A good many General officers have tried to reverse it, but I cannot recall that their efforts met with marked success. No one for a moment supposes that General Ruggles's troops did other than obey his orders. It was my good fortune to see those troops, not only at Shiloh, with General Ruggles, but also at Mumfordsville, Perryville, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Resaca, New Hope Church, Kenesaw, around Atlanta, at Franklin, Nashville and Spanish Fort, without General Ruggles. I never heard that they disobeyed an order or failed in a duty. But, Mr. Editor, to end the disagreable subject, permit me to hand you the following dispatch, penned by Gen eral Ruggles's department commander, but two days before he was killed on his line of battle: near Marietta, Ga., June 12th, 1864. Hon. Jas. A. Seddon, Secretary of War: Brigadier-General Ruggles, of the department of Alabama, Mississippi and East Louisiana is, I believe, regarded
he enemy. One hundred one torpedoes were planted in Roanoke River, North Carolina, after a flotilla of twelve vessels had started up to capture Fort Branch. The torpedoes destroyed six of the vessels and frustrated the attack. Every avenue to the outworks or to the city of Mobile was guarded by submarine torpedoes, so that it was impossible for any vessel drawing three feet of water to get within effective cannon range of the defenses. Two ironclads attempted to get near enough to Spanish Fort to take part in the bombardment. They both struck torpedoes, and went to the bottom on Apalachie bar; thenceforward the fleet made no further attempt to encounter the almost certain destruction which they saw awaited any vessel which might attempt to enter the torpedo-guarded waters. But many were sunk when least expecting it. Some went down long after the Confederate forces had evacuated Mobile. The Tecumseh was probably sunk, says Major General D. H. Maury, Southern Historical Socie
355. Smith, Gen. A. J., 341, 457, 473, 474, 541, 542. Gen. Chas. F., 15, 21, 26, 41. Gen. E. K., 33, 324, 340, 458, 590, 591, 592-93. Advance into Kentucky, 323. Maj. Frank, 563. Gen. G. W., 70, 71, 79, 100, 101, 102, 103, 105, 106, 131, 470. Gen. Kirby, 349. Commodore Leon, 197, 198, 201. Report on Battle of Sabine Pass, 199-200. Gen. M. L., 59, 182, 203. Lt. N. H., 199, 200. South Carolina, 13. Reconstruction, 625-29. Southern Cross, The (poem), 392. Spangler, Edward, 417. Spanish Fort, 175. Spotsylvania Court House, Battle of, 437-39. Springfield. Mo., Battle of, 14. Stanton, Edwin M., 67, 69, 70, 414, 442, 510, 513, 584. Call for militia to defend Washington, 88-90. Starke, General, 272. State rights, 380-82, 388, 493, 644. Comparison with U. S. Government, 382-84. Loss of by northern states, 422. Statham, General, 37, 53. Steele, General, 254, 255, 455, 456, 458. Steinwehr, General, 264. Stellwagen, Captain, 172. Stephens, Alexander H., 501, 503
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blakely, battle of. (search)
Blakely, battle of. Ever since Steele's arrival from Pensacola Blakely had been held in a state of siege. By the fall of Spanish Fort, water communication between Blakely and Mobile had been cut off. It was defended by abatis, chevaux-de-frise, and torpedoes, and had a ditch in the rear of these. In front of these Canby formed a strong line of battle, Hawkins's negro troops being on the right, the divisions of Veatch and Andrews in the centre, and Garrard's division on the left. On Sunday afternoon. April 8, 1865, when the assault began, a heavy thunder-storm was gathering. There was a fierce struggle with obstacles in front of the fort. The whole National line participated in the assault. Great guns were making fearful lanes through their ranks. Tempests of grape and canister from the armament of the fort made dreadful havoc. At length the colored brigade were ordered to carry the works. They sprang forward with the shout, Remember Fort Pillow! They went over the Confe
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Florida, (search)
against the new settlements, and also to procure the assassination of Oglethorpe. The latter, not fairly prepared to resist an invasion, sent a messenger to St. Augustine to invite the Spanish conmandant to a friendly conference. He explored some of the coast islands and prepared for fortification. His messenger did not return, and he proceeded to secure possession of the country so far as its defined boundary permitted him. His hostile preparations made the Spaniards Ruins of an old Spanish Fort in Florida. vigilant, and even threaten war; and when, in 1739, there was war between England and Spain, he determined to strike the Spaniards at St. Augustine a heavy blow before they were fully prepared to resist it. He penetrated Florida with a small force and captured some outposts early in 1740; and in May he marched towards St. Augustine with 600 regular troops, 400 Carolina militia, and a large body of friendly Indians. With these he stood before St. Augustine in June, after capt
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mobile, Ala. (search)
of negro troops and some cavalry, had been marching from Pensacola to Blakely, 10 miles north of Mobile, to induce the belief that Montgomery was Canby's real objective point. On March 25 this force encountered and defeated 800 Alabama cavalry under General Clanton. The Confederates lost about 200 men killed and wounded, and 275 made prisoners. Steele found very little opposition afterwards until he reached the front of Blakely. The Nationals on the east side of the bay pushed on to Spanish Fort, 7 miles east of Mobile. It was invested, March 27, but its garrison of nearly 3,000 of Hood's late army, with its neighbors, made it a stout antagonist, willing to give blow for blow. Warmer and warmer waxed the fight on that day, and before sunset a tremendous artillery duel was in progress, in which gunboats of both parties joined, and kept it up all night. Then a siege was formally begun (March 28). The Nationals finally brought to bear upon the fort sixteen mortars, twenty heavy
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