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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.21 (search)
h Mississippi Cavalry, not over 300 strong, commanded by that brilliant young Colonel Alexander H. Chalmers, was holding the line of the Tallahatchie in front of Abbeville. His position was a very unfavorable one. The south bank of the river was much lower than the north bank, and furthermore the timber had been cut from the sout river and moved against the Mississippians, but were driven back. Colonel Chalmers held his position until late in the evening of August 9, and then retired to Abbeville, where he was re-enforced by General Chalmers with McCulloch's brigade. During the night General Smith crossed with a division of his army, and on the morningre we remained several days. On Monday, August 15, General Chalmers took about 200 men, including his escort, and moving around the enemy's flank, dashed into Abbeville, where two brigades of infantry were camped, throwing them into confusion. They fled precipitately, and were pursued until we saw a large force in line of battl
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Monument to Wyatt First to die in War. From the News leader, December 30, 1908. (search)
states that a gentleman of means has offered to give an additional $1,000 to the fund provided the first $1,000 is raised by Friday, the first day of January. Only $156 must be raised, therefore, within the next three days to insure that the fund will be $2,000 on the first day of the New Year. In a private letter Captain Mitchener said: Now to get this special gift of $1,000, the Daughters of the Confederacy need to raise only $156 more by Friday. Urge them to come to the rescue. The Wyatt monument will then be a certainty and can be unveiled on the tenth day of next June, the forty-eighth anniversary. This appeal should meet with instant response. There are at least sixteen chapters of the Daughters who can easily raise $10 each within three days to guarantee the needed $156 by Friday. Let them act at once. Contributions should be sent to Captain John A. Mitchener, Salem, N. C., or if sent to The News and Observer they will be acknowledged in this paper and the money fo
A A Georgia volunteer, M. A. Townsend, IX., 276. A message, E. S. P. Ward, IX., 144, 145, 146. A. Of P., Headquarters, mail and newspapers, VIII., 33. A Second Review of the grand Army, F. Bret Harte, IX., 232. A soldier's grave, John Albee. IX., 274. Abatis V., 210. Abbeville, La., VII., 240. Abbeville, Miss., III., 330. Abbey, H., IX., 108. Abbot, H. L.: III., 186; V., 51, 192. Abbot, J. C., III., 327. Abercrombie, J. J.: I., 28; sons of, VIII., 192. Aberdeen, Ark., I., 368. About-Faced Redoubt, Petersburg, Va., V., 49. Accakeek Creek, Va., V., 280. Acceptation, M. J. Preston, IX., 230, 231. Adairsville, Ga., III., 112. Adams, C. F.: I., 90; III., 94; V., 247; VI., 40; VIII., 135; eulogy on Gen. Lee by, IX., 38; oration by, IX., 122, 123. Adams, D. W.: III., 346; X., 273. Adams, H. A., VI., 19, 257. Adams, J.: II., 288; III., 264, 340; X., 157. Adams, J.
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book V:—Tennessee. (search)
Pemberton's communications seriously enough to convince the latter of his inability to maintain himself on the Tallahatchie. By a combined march, Grant and Sherman had reached the borders of this river on the 29th of November, one in front of Abbeville and the other at Wyatt. They had anticipated a desperate conflict before this obstacle; the enemy's works had even seemed so formidable that Grant, deeming it impossible to carry them by main force, was preparing to turn them, and had already Wyatt. They had anticipated a desperate conflict before this obstacle; the enemy's works had even seemed so formidable that Grant, deeming it impossible to carry them by main force, was preparing to turn them, and had already sent his cavalry across the Tallahatchie on his extreme left, when, on the morning of December 1st, Pemberton evacuated all his positions and retired toward Grenada. The Federals pursued his rear-guards as far as Oxford, halfway between Grand Junction and Grenada; but being obliged to repair the railroad to procure their supplies, they were not able greatly to harass his march. However, while their infantry occupied Oxford on the 5th of December, their cavalry was already in the vicinity of
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the war in the South-West. (search)
Colonel McMillen was sent in the early part of February from Memphis, via Hernando, in the direction of the Tallahatchie; it appeared on the 7th in the vicinity of Wyatt, near this river, and feigned to undertake throwing a bridge across it. Forrest's troops, as we have said, were distributed somewhat to the south of this river, th being informed of McMillen's movement, he disposed his three other brigades along the Tallahatchie, the course of which he proposed to defend between Panola and Abbeville. It was when in this position that he received the news of the departure of the two columns of hostile cavalry from Germantown and Collierville. He surmised at orders to concentrate at Oxford, whence they could proceed quickly toward the Mobile and Ohio Railroad. This movement was retarded by McMillen's demonstration on Wyatt, which was supported by a regiment detached from Grierson's division. The Southern horsemen, being vigorously attacked on the 12th, thought that McMillen wished
certain, the capture of the gallant and popular Major Andrews, of Goldsboro', has roused that section to a mighty pitch of excitement. At Newbern serious apprehensions are entertained for the safety of property, as it is known that the notorious Butler, of "contraband" celebrity, is in command of the expedition. We again urge the completion of the necessary defensive works here, and the organization of all the force that can be brought into service. Why can't we have the works at Wyatt made and armed? How are our guns and ammunition at other points? The Journal further says: Colonel Fremont and General Gatlin must be sustained by the people. They are now operating here on means derived from the Safety Committee, not from Raleigh, to which however we must pay taxes. Thank God the Military Board is gone. Let Governor Clark do something to redeem the State from the disgrace inflicted upon her by the disaster — the shameful sacrifice of our men at Hatteras.
From the Southwest. Mobile, Nov. 17. --A special dispatch to the Advertiser and Register, dated Abbeville, 11th, says our cavalry again occupy Holly Springs, Miss., and that the enemy have retired to Grand Junction and Bolivar.
United States Senator S. G. Arnold, of Rhode Island, having been classed by the radical journals as a Republican, has written a letter repudiating all sympathy with that party and stating that he was elected in opposition to it. Arnold is a "Conservative." The St. Louis Democrat, (radical Republican,) says a majority of the Democratic editors of the North are a pack of villainous traitors, manufacturing the grossest lies against the Government and its officers, for the purpose of dividing the people of the North. The rumor that $500,000 worth of stores were destroyed by the Federals at Abbeville, Miss., is untrue. It is stated that $3,000 will cover the whole loss. Dr. Wm. Stepice, an old physician of Bedford county, Va., died on the 10th inst.
The Daily Dispatch: November 5, 1863., [Electronic resource], The recent engagement of General Chalmers in Mississippi. (search)
ing back. They reached the Tallahatchie river and crossed, dismounted, and formed a line of battle. The Yankees coming up, our troops engaged them, and finally drove them back, with a Yankee loss of twelve killed, left on the field, and one captain (a Kansas jayhawker) wounded and captured. Of the number of them wounded nothing could be ascertained. Our loss was four or six killed, and some ten or twelve wounded. The Yankees admit a defeat at the river. On their retreat, passing through Wyatt, they burned every house in the place, and would not permit any of the sufferers to save anything, not even wearing apparel. In the western portion of the county through which they retreated they burned all the residences and barns. They also destroyed the little town of Tallapoosa, six miles west of Holly Springs, as they passed through it. On yesterday, from the cupola of the court-house in Holly Springs, the smoke of as many as fifteen or twenty fires could plainly be seen all along th
Restoring the Union. --The brutal Federal soldiers, and their more brutal officers, have a great way of "restoring the Union." Here is a sample of their deeds in Mississippi, committed during their late raid in the vicinity of Holly Springs: On their retreat passing through Wyatt, they burned every house in the place, and would not permit any of the sufferers to save anything — not even wearing apparel. In the western portion of the country through which they retreated they burned all the residences and barns. They also destroyed the little town of Tallapoosa, six miles west of Holly Springs, as they passed through it. On yesterday, from the cupola of the court house in Holly Springs the smoke of as many as fifteen or twenty fires could plainly be seen all along the route of their retreat, and it is believed not a single residence or barn in that part of the country has escaped them.
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