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bts, redans, and cremailleres, not very properly arranged and located, with the exception of Fort Pemberton, on the Stono, and of some of the redoubts. A simpler system might, I think, have been origl's Creek and the Wappoo are not yet entirely completed, requiring about fifteen days more. Fort Pemberton is a strong work, and has an armament of twenty guns of various calibres. There are two baty the Commanding General to inform you that Major Harris reports the two redoubts in rear of Fort Pemberton as ready for their armament, to wit: one 24-pounder on siege-carriage, from the cremaillere with as many guns as can be brought to bear on that island. The 24-pounder rifled piece at Fort Pemberton will also be sent to the redoubt nearest Secessionville, for the same purpose, as soon as re The existing defensive lines on James Island, with a trace of seven miles, reaching from Fort Pemberton to Secessionville, as I always feared, are so defective that it has become clearly injudicio
ing over pulleys. The arrangements for testing, crushing, bending, transverse, compressing, punching, or indenting strains are in general similar; the specimen being placed in the space between the cross-head and cylinder, so as to be subject to a compressive force, while for applying tensile or drawing and similar strains it is placed on the other side of the cross-head, so as to be drawn toward the cylinder a. Special appliances for each of these requirements are provided. See also Greenwood's testing-machine, page 58*, Class VII. Vol. I., Official Catalogue of English Exhibition of 1862. See also weighing-scale. In the hydraulic tensile testing-machine (Fig. 6329), the ram of the cylinder being pushed back, the specimen is held by the two clips a b, and the pump, operated by the lever c, causes the ram to exert a pulling strain upon it, which is communicated to a rod connected with the scale-beam, which has a sliding weight and removable weights, indicating the force ap
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Mississippi, 1863 (search)
OURI--6th Cavalry (Detachment). Union loss, 1 killed, 2 missing. Total, 3. March 11: Engagement, Fort PembertonINDIANA--46th and 47th Infantry; U. S. Gunboats "Chillicothe" and "DeKalb." March 13-April 5: Operations against Fort Pemberton and GreenwoodILLINOIS--2d Cavalry (Co. "E"), 48th, 56th, 72d and 93d Infantry. INDIANA--43d, 46th and 47th and 59th Infantry. IOWA--3d Battery Light Arty.; 5th, 10th, 17th, 24th, 29th, 33d and 36th Infantry. MINNESOTA--4th Infantry. MISSOURI--5th Cavalry (Co Battery Light Arty.; 4th, 9th, 25th, 30th and 31st Infantry. MISSOURI--Battery "F" 2d Light Arty.; 3d, 17th, 27th, 29th, 30th, 31st and 32d Infantry. OHIO--4th Indpt. Battery Light Arty.; 76th Infantry. April 2: Engagement, Fort Pemberton and GreenwoodConfederate Reports. April 4: Skirmish, Fort PembertonIOWA--36th Infantry. April 7: Skirmish, Deer CreekOHIO--76th Infantry. April 8: Skirmish, Deer CreekMISSOURI--27th Infantry. April 9: Skirmish, PascagoulaLOUISIANA--2d Colored Infantry. U
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
ved to Moscow, Miss., November 21, and join Quinby's Command. Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign. Operations on the Mississippi Central R. R. November 21-December 30. Duty on line of the Memphis and Charleston R. R. till January 10, 1863. At Memphis, Tenn., till February 24. Yazoo Pass Expedition, by Moon Lake, Yazoo Pass and the Coldwater and Tallahatchie Rivers February 24-April 8. Operations against Fort Pemberton and Greenwood March 13-April 5. Fort Pemberton near Greenwood March 11-16-25-April 2 and 4. Moved to Milliken's Bend, La., and guard duty from Milliken's Bend to New Carthage till April 25. Duty at Richmond, La., April 25-May 10. Battle of Champion's Hill May 16. Siege of Vicksburg, Miss., May 18-July 4. Assaults on Vicksburg May 19 and 22. Expedition to Mechanicsburg May 26-June 4. Surrender of Vicksburg July 4. Moved to Natchez, Miss., July 12-13, and duty there till October 17. Action at St. Catherine's Creek July 28 and
1865. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, Reserve Corps, Military Division Dept. West Mississippi, to February, 1865. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 13th Corps, to July, 1865. Service. Duty at St. Louis, Mo., till December 21, 1862. Moved to Columbus, Ky., December 21-24; thence to Union City, Tenn., January 1-3, 1863, and to Helena, Ark., January 8. Duty there till August. Yazoo Pass Expedition by Moon Lake, Yazoo Pass and Tallahatchie and Coldwater Rivers and operations against Ft. Pemberton and Greenwood February 14-April 8. Yazoo Pass April 16. Expedition from Helena May 6-13. Repulse of Holmes' attack on Helena July 4. Steele's Expedition to Little Rock August 11-September 10. Bayou Fourche and capture of Little Rock September 10. Duty at Little Rock till March, 1864. Expedition to Benton October 25-26, 1863. Steele's Expedition to Camden March 23-May 3, 1864. Antoine or Terre Noir Creek April 2. Elkins' Ferry, Little Missouri River, April 3-
, David A., 20, 106, 114, 149, 183. Paul Jones, gunboat, 41. Pawnee, gunboat, 52, 54, 56, 59, 60, 100, 177, 209, 237. Pawnee Landing, S. C., 67, 186. Pay of Chaplain, 150. Pay of Fifty-Fourth, 47, 48, 109, 130, 135, 142, 179, 180, 181, 190, 191, 220, 227, 228, 238, 288, 312. Payne, Lewis S., 109. Payne's Dock, 109, 206, 207. Payson, Mary P., 16. Peal, Henry F., 90, 164, 168. Pease, Giles M., 111, 145, 164, 166, 183, 196. Pease, W. B., 171. Pedee River, S. C., 289. Pemberton, Fort, 53,199. Pennsylvania Troops. Infantry: Fifty-Second, 52, 63, 64, 139, 187, 188, 196, 206, 217, 234, 282, 283. Seventy-Fourth, 201, 209, 215. Seventy-Sixth, 74. Eighty-Fifth, 111, 115, 116, 157. Ninety-Seventh, 53, 54, 63, 74,103, 106. One Hundred and Fourth, 52, 118, 139, 187, 188. Perkins, James A., 115. Pet, prize schooner, 42. Philadelphia, steamer, 210. Philadelphia Weekly Times, 251. Philbrick, E P., 15. Phillips, Wendell, 10, 13, 15, 24, 32, 180. Phillips, Will
Ernest Crosby, Garrison the non-resistant, Chapter 12: practical lessons from Garrison's career (search)
h a frank and outspoken man, and he would have been out of his element in Congress. Service is higher than office. Someone must needs be President, but to live for others is the special gift of God. The real life of the nation is not to be found at Washington. That fair city, with its marble monuments, its memorial statues, recalling so many hatreds and slaughters of the past, and its well-kept lawns and drives, reminds me of nothing so much as a beautiful cemetery-another Woodlawn or Greenwood — where all is dead, with no manufactures, no agriculture, no natural industry --peopled by nothing but the mere effigies of men and women and hiding a festering mass of corruption. Such will never be the source of any true reform. (4) The message of Garrison was based on abstract morality, and never deviated a hair's breadth one way or the other on account of any discrepancy between the exigencies of theory and those of practice. We have seen that there is sometimes such a discrepanc
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eleventh: his death, and public honors to his memory. (search)
nd he spared nothing that stood in his way. And though his unswerving fidelity brought him to death's door, he lived–as few of the world's heroes have—to see his complete triumph, and to feel in his heart, we have no doubt, the sweet consciousness that mankind would never willingly let his memory die. But amongst all the floral offerings which deck his sylvan grave, one at least shall be laid there by the gentle hand of woman:—and whose fingers could better weave the chaplet than Grace Greenwood's? With the memory of my great friend (can it be that he is already only a memory?) come certain further off, pale and uncertain presences—the friends who were about him when I knew him first—Hawthorne, with his noble, sensitive face, his deep-set, furtive, melancholy eyes; Starr King, radiant with genius and princely in his perfect humanity; that beautiful wife of his poet-friend, she whose sweet, sad voice was prophetic of her martyr-like fate; that scholarly brother, so like him
nd he spared nothing that stood in his way. And though his unswerving fidelity brought him to death's door, he lived–as few of the world's heroes have—to see his complete triumph, and to feel in his heart, we have no doubt, the sweet consciousness that mankind would never willingly let his memory die. But amongst all the floral offerings which deck his sylvan grave, one at least shall be laid there by the gentle hand of woman:—and whose fingers could better weave the chaplet than Grace Greenwood's? With the memory of my great friend (can it be that he is already only a memory?) come certain further off, pale and uncertain presences—the friends who were about him when I knew him first—Hawthorne, with his noble, sensitive face, his deep-set, furtive, melancholy eyes; Starr King, radiant with genius and princely in his perfect humanity; that beautiful wife of his poet-friend, she whose sweet, sad voice was prophetic of her martyr-like fate; that scholarly brother, so like him
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Victoria, Queen of England. (search)
footmen let down the steps for the little, royal lady, who proceeded to lift from the dust the pretty piece of cambric and lace. She blushed a good deal, though she tossed her head saucily, and she was doubtless angry enough. But the mortifying lesson may have nipped in the bud her first impulse towards coquetry. It was hard, but it was wholesome. How many American mothers would be equal to such a piece of Spartan discipline? I will venture to borrow another pretty story from Grace Greenwood's budget. The following anecdote was related to her by the hero of it. My friend, Mr. W--, is a person of very artistic tastes,--a passionate picture lover. He had seen all the great paintings in the public galleries of London, and had a strong desire to see those of Buckingham Palace, which, that not being a show-house, were inaccessible to an ordinary connoisseur. Fortune favored him at last. He was the brother of a London carpet merchant, who had orders to put down new carpets
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