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ners, 1,000 stand of arms, 1,000 horses, and an abundance of tents, baggage, and supplies, were among the trophies of this easy triumph. Pope's losses in these operations scarcely exceeded 100 men; while his prisoners alone were said to be 2,500. Among them was Col. Magoffin, brother of the late Governor of Kentucky. Price, thus roughly handled before he had been able to concentrate his forces, did not choose to risk a general engagement. He retreated rapidly through Springfield and Cassville, closely pursued, and fighting at intervals, until he had crossed the Arkansas line, forming a junction, soon afterward, near Boston Mountains, with Gen. Ben McCulloch, commanding a division of Texas and Arkansas Confederates, thus raising his entire force to a number fully equal with that which had so keenly pursued him, which was now commanded by Gen. Samuel R. Curtis, of Iowa, and which, after continuing the pursuit down to Fayetteville, Arkansas, had retraced its steps to and halted at
who, with 2,000 mounted men and 2 guns, had rapidly crossed the Boston mountains from Ozark, intending to attack at daylight, but not arriving till after sunrise. After due shelling, a spirited cavalry charge on our right wing was led by Col. Munroe, but repulsed; and by noon the enemy were on their way back to Ozark. Harrison, having very few horses, was unable to pursue. His loss was but 4 killed, 26 wounded, 16 prisoners, and 35 missing, whom he Bluntly reports as mostly stampeded to Cassville during the engagement. lie took 55 prisoners, 50 horses, and 100 shot-guns. He says all of his force who did any fighting numbered less than 500. Marmaduke, after his failure in south-western Missouri and his mishap at Batesville, repaired to Little Rock; where a new campaign was planned, in conjunction with the choice spirits there assembled. South-western Missouri was preponderantly Union; while south-eastern, at least below the Iron mountain, was considered otherwise. It is an un
correspondent at Curran, Stone County, Missouri, gives the following account of this affair:--The report which reached us at Springfield, gave rise to the belief that Gen. McCulloch designed an attack upon that point, by two columns moving from Cassville and Sarcoxie. The Federal scouts reported their force at about fifteen thousand in each division, and on Wednesday they were reported within twenty miles of the town and advancing from Cassville. On the 1st instant Gen. Lyon ordered his entirCassville. On the 1st instant Gen. Lyon ordered his entire command, with the exception of a small guard, to rendezvous at Crane Creek, ten miles south of Springfield. The command consisted as follows. The exact strength of the different corps I am not at liberty to give, for obvious military precaution: Five companies First and Second Regiment Regulars, Major Sturgis. Five companies First Regiment Missouri Volunteers, Lieutenant-Col. Andrews. Two companies Second Regiment Missouri Volunteers, Major Osterhous. Three companies Third Regiment Miss
egan to move my command from its encampment on Cowskin Prairie, in McDonald County, on the 25th of July, toward Cassville, in Barry County, at which place it had been agreed between Gens. McCulloch, Pearce, and myself, that our respective forces, together with those of Brig.-Gen. McBride, should be concentrated, preparatory to a forward movement. We reached Cassville on Sunday, the 28th of July, and on the next day effected a junction with the armies of Gens. McCulloch and Pearce. The combined armies were then put under marching orders, and the First Division, Gen. McCulloch commanding, left Cassville on the 1st of August, upon the road to this city. The Second Division, under Gen. Pearce, of Arkansas, left on the 1st day of August; cond Division, which embraced the greater portion of my infantry, and encamped with it some twelve miles north-west of Cassville. The next morning, a messenger from Gen. McCulloch informed me that he had reason to believe that the enemy were in fo
egan to move my command from its encampment on Cowskin Prairie, in McDonald County, on the 25th of July, toward Cassville, in Barry County, at which place it had been agreed between Gens. McCulloch, Pearce, and myself, that our respective forces, together with those of Brig.-Gen. McBride, should be concentrated, preparatory to a forward movement. We reached Cassville on Sunday, the 28th of July, and on the next day effected a junction with the armies of Gens. McCulloch and Pearce. The combined armies were then put under marching orders, and the First Division, Gen. McCulloch commanding, left Cassville on the 1st of August, upon the road to this city. The Second Division, under Gen. Pearce, of Arkansas, left on the 1st day of August; cond Division, which embraced the greater portion of my infantry, and encamped with it some twelve miles north-west of Cassville. The next morning, a messenger from Gen. McCulloch informed me that he had reason to believe that the enemy were in fo
Doc. 134. the Fremont-Price treaty. General Hunter's Repudiation of it. Gen. Hunter to Gen. Price. Headquarters Western Department, Springfield, Mo., Nov. 7, 1861. General Sterling Price, commanding forces at Cassville, Mo.: General: Referring to an agreement purporting to have been made between Major-Generals Fremont and Price, respectively, commanding antagonistic forces in the State of Missouri, to the effect that, in future, arrests or forcible interference, by armed or unarmed parties of citizens within the limits of said State, for the mere entertainment or expression of political opinions, shall hereafter cease; that families now broken up for such causes may be reunited; and that the war now progressing shall be exclusively confined to armies in the field — I have to state: That, as General commanding the forces of the United States in this Department, I can in no manner recognize the agreement aforesaid, or any of its provisions, whether implied or direct; and
the enemy advancing upon me in force. No resource was now left me except retreat, without hazarding all with greatly unequal numbers upon the result of one engagement. This I deemed it unwise to do. I commenced retreating at once. I reached Cassville with loss unworthy of mention in any respect. Here the enemy in my rear commenced a series of attacks running through four days. Retreating and fighting all the way to the Cross Hollows in this State, I am rejoiced to say my command, under theen wounded. That of the enemy we know to be ten times as great. Col. Henry Little, commanding the First brigade, with Cols. B. A. Rives and J. Q. Burbridge, of the infantry, and Col. E. Gates, of the cavalry, covered this retreat from beyond Cassville, and acted as the rear-guard. The Colonel commanding deserves the highest praise for unceasing watchfulness, and the good management of his entire command. I heartily commend him to your attention. All these officers merit, and should receiv
he road; the Eighth, with Klaus's battery, in the centre, on another prominent point, and the Eighteenth upon the next ridge to the right, each point being separated by deep ravines extending back a considerable distance in the direction of the Cassville road. Col. Benton, and Lieut.-Col. Washburn, in compliance with orders, set their respective commands to work, throwing up in the course of five hours, quite a respectable breast-work, which in case of an attack from the direction of Cross Holt of the sixth, the brigade bivou acked in this position. Nothing of moment transpired until about ten o'clock of the seventh, when the firing of artillery was heard a mile or two to our right rear; also, heavy firing heard in the direction of Cassville, immediately in our rear. The Twenty-second, having in the mean time been ordered by you to reinforce Col. Vandevier, near the village of Leetown, the left wing of the Eighth, under Lieut.-Col. Shunk, and Captain Klaus, with one section and
lery, including four mountain howitzers. My long line of communications required garrisons at Marshfield, Springfield, Cassville, and Keitsville, besides a constant moving force to guard my train. My force in Arkansas was, therefore, not more thane more arduous: Col. Boyd, at Rolla; Col. Wains, at Lebanon; Colonel Mills, at Springfield; and Lieut.-Col. Holland, at Cassville. To do justice to all, I would spread before you the most of the rolls of this army, for I can bear testimony to theere too bad to bring this important material along. Major Conrad, with his detachment, found his way to Keitsville and Cassville, which place he left on the ninth, and arrived at the former place with Col. Wright, some time after I had opened the road to Cassville in the pursuit of Price's force, which retired from Keitsville to Berryville. II. retreat from M'Kisick's farm by Bentonville, to camp Halleck, on Sugar Creek. At two o'clock in the morning of the sixth, the troops encamp
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 151.-the fight at Neosho, Mo. (search)
letter furnishes the particulars of Major Hubbard's gallant exploit at and near Neosho: Cassville, April 27, 1862. dear mother and sister: We left Cassville April 20th, to go on a scout of Cassville April 20th, to go on a scout of three days, out towards the Indian nation, having heard that there was a band of jayhawkers out there with a large drove of horses, mules, cattle, etc., which they had taken from the citizens of Miss, shooting him through the leg just below the knee, but not breaking the bone. We started for Cassville the next morning, having been gone four days, but we found it a very serious undertaking, for afraid if we staid till night, they might attack us again, and clean us out. So we started for Cassville, which was about thirty-five miles from Neosho. We travelled about ten miles, and camped in acked us we could have a fair chance at them; but they never made their appearance. We reached Cassville last night about five o'clock, having been gone six days instead of three. We had taken about
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