Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) or search for Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wells, Clark Henry 1822-1888 (search)
Wells, Clark Henry 1822-1888 Naval officer; born in Reading, Pa., Sept. 22, 1822; graduated at the United States Naval Academy in 1846; served in the Mexican War; was on the Petrel when that vessel took part in covering the disembarking of Scott's army and in the bombardment of Vera Cruz; and accompanied the expedition which took Tampico and Tuspan in 1846-47. When the Civil War broke out he was made executive officer of the steamer Susquehanna, which participated in the capture of Port Royal, S. C.; commanded a number of boat expeditions against batteries in the inland coast waters of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida; promoted lieutenant-commander in July, 1862; commanded the steamer Galena of the Western Gulf blockading squadron; and was present at the battle of Mobile Bay. Subsequently he served with Admiral Porter at Hampton Roads; was promoted captain in June, 1871; rearadmiral, Aug. 1, 1884; and was retired Sept. 22, following. He died in Washington, D. C., Jan. 28, 18
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), William's War, King (search)
ffered. All the colonies were aroused by these atrocities, and the New England people resolved on speedy retaliation. In May (1690) Massachusetts fitted out an expedition under Sir William Phipps, who, with nine vessels and 800 men, seized Port Royal, in Acadia (q. v.), and obtained sufficient plunder there to pay the expenses of the enterprise. In June, Port Royal was again plundered by English privateers from the West Indies. Then the colonies of New England and New York joined in efforPort Royal was again plundered by English privateers from the West Indies. Then the colonies of New England and New York joined in efforts to conquer Canada. A land and naval expedition was arranged, the former commanded by a son of Governor Winthrop, of Connecticut, to go from New York by way of Lake Champlain to attack Montreal; and the latter, fitted out by Massachusetts alone, and commanded by Sir William Phipps, to attack Quebec. Phipps's armament consisted of thirty-four vessels and 2,000 men. The expenses of the land expedition were borne jointly by Connecticut and New York. Both were unsuccessful. Some of Winthrop'
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