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that she was familiar with that corps, by inquiring as to the fate of two officers named Grey. Doherty told her that one of them had been killed. This she promptly denied, from the strength of other information which had reached her, but her suspicions were removed by the explanation that the Grey we mean was a private. The fugitives, however, seeing that Mrs. Macon was by no means a person of easy credulity, lost no time in relieving her Southern hospitality of their presence. Near Leesburgh, still passing for Alabamians, they met a man who was satisfied with their story that they were picking blackberries, and had got separated from their regiment. He kindly informed them that they would find their comrades at Ball's Mill waiting for artillery. Near Milford they met a little boy and girl, who directed them, for information, to the house of a Mr. Edwards, where they arrived at 5 P. M. on Saturday. Here also they perceived they were suspected, for a horseman rode up, and a
Bluff, Edwards' Ferry, Harrison's Island, and Leesburg. fought October 21, 1861. General Stone's e and draw out the intentions of the enemy at Leesburg, I went to Edwards' Ferry, at one o'clock P. to the island, having been within one mile of Leesburg, and there discovering in the edge of a wood to make a reconnoissance in the direction of Leesburg from Edwards' Ferry, I directed General Gormaoceeded to examine the space between that and Leesburg, sending back to report that thus far he coul the first, and connected by a good road with Leesburg. Capt. Candy, assistant adjutant-general, anng as far as it was safe on the right, toward Leesburg, and on the left toward the Leesburg and Gum Leesburg and Gum Spring road. I also informed Col. Baker that Gen. German, opposite Edwards' Ferry, should be reinfodiscover the best line from that ferry to the Leesburg and Gum Spring road, already mentioned; and tce, and under no circumstances to pass beyond Leesburg, or a strong position between it and Goose Cr[3 more...]
At this point we halted until daybreak, being joined here by a company of one hundred men from the Twentieth Massachusetts, accompanied by Colonel Lee, who were to protect our return. At daybreak we pushed forward our reconnoissance toward Leesburgh to the distance of about a mile from the river, to a spot supposed to be the site of the rebel encampment, but found, on passing through the woods, that the scouts had been deceived by a line of trees on the brow of the slope, the openings throh which presented, in an uncertain light, somewhat the appearance of a line of tents. Leaving the detachment in the woods, I proceeded with Captain Philbrick and two or three scouts across this slope and along the other line of it, observing Leesburgh, which was in full view, and the country about it, as carefully as possible, and seeing but four tents of the enemy. My force being well concealed by the woods, and having no reason to believe my presence was discovered, and no large number of
bly during the cannonading of the 20th. At this passing the road enters a thick wood, with a great growth of underbrush, impenetrable to our flanking at the gait we were moving. They were, consequently, drawn up the road and ordered to proceed at a slow gallop. The road was here so narrow and crooked that they could not keep over forty paces in the front. Three hundred yards from the house a road crosses the one we were upon, running to the bridge over Goose Creek on the left, and to Leesburgh on the right. I, however, kept straight on, as the road presented little opportunities for observation, and would sooner reach the high and open country around the enemy's breastworks to the left and front. Soon after reaching this point we drove in a vidette of the enemy, who took the alarm too soon to allow a reasonable chance of our capturing him, and I did not wish to fatigue our horses by useless pursuit. A negro, whom we had met, reported that a regiment of infantry and a body of
aw and Semmes's brigades, supported by Gen. Griffith's brigade from Magruder's division. The Federals were found to be strongly intrenched, and as soon as our skirmishers came in view they were opened upon with a furious cannonade from a park of field-pieces. Kemper's battery now went to the front, and for three hours the battle raged hotly, when the discomfited Yankees again resumed their back track. It was during this fight that General Griffith, of Mississippi, one of the heroes of Leesburgh, (where he commanded the Eighteenth Mississippi, on the fall of Colonel Burt,) was killed by the fragment of a shell, which mangled one of his legs. He was the only general officer killed on our side during the whole of that bloody week. Owing to a most unfortunate accident much of our success was marred. Our own troops, being mistaken for the enemy, were fired into by the Twenty-first Mississippi regiment, as was Jenkins's South-Carolina regiment at Manassas, by reenforcements in the r
I had at that time was that Jackson might attempt to retreat to the north in the direction of Leesburgh, and for the purpose of preventing this, I directed Kearny to keep closely in contact with himand his line covered by an old railroad-grade which leads from Gainesville in the direction of Leesburgh. His batteries, which were numerous, and some of them of heavy calibre, were posted behind th enormous marches. On Wednesday, the third instant, we marched to Dranesville; on Thursday to Leesburgh, where we met D. H. Hill's corps, Ripley's division, and perhaps others. On yesterday the arm-day before day, and reached this town by one P. M., or earlier. It is twenty-four miles from Leesburgh, and within eighteen of Pennsylvania. Of the scene at the passage of the Potomac I have not time to speak, nor of the battle-field of Leesburgh. Saunders, coming on in an independent way, captured the telegraph operator, turned him over to Gen. Jackson, and heard him send a message to Old A
I had at that time was that Jackson might attempt to retreat to the north in the direction of Leesburgh, and for the purpose of preventing this, I directed Kearny to keep closely in contact with himand his line covered by an old railroad-grade which leads from Gainesville in the direction of Leesburgh. His batteries, which were numerous, and some of them of heavy calibre, were posted behind th enormous marches. On Wednesday, the third instant, we marched to Dranesville; on Thursday to Leesburgh, where we met D. H. Hill's corps, Ripley's division, and perhaps others. On yesterday the arm-day before day, and reached this town by one P. M., or earlier. It is twenty-four miles from Leesburgh, and within eighteen of Pennsylvania. Of the scene at the passage of the Potomac I have not time to speak, nor of the battle-field of Leesburgh. Saunders, coming on in an independent way, captured the telegraph operator, turned him over to Gen. Jackson, and heard him send a message to Old A
However, in regard to this I wrote to General Lee, and he prevented it. Their reception in Frederick was decidedly cool; all the stores shut, no flags flying, and every thing partook of a churchyard appearance. The troops had marched from Leesburgh, twenty-three miles distant, since two A. M., crossing at Hauling Ford — a swift march, and more than our men could do. They were the filthiest set of men and officers I ever saw; with clothing that was ragged, and had not been cleaned for weekipline was observed, implicit obedience was maintained; for if a man declined or moved tardily, a blow from sabre or butt of a pistol enforced the order. It was stated by the men that four of the army had been shot for straggling since leaving Leesburgh. They were entirely in the dark as to their future movements, expecting, however, to go either to Baltimore or to Pennsylvania. During the day several medical officers called, among others a Dr. Coleman, Medical Director of Jackson. He was
tars we contend, Assured that God will us defend-- He makes our cause his own: Not of our gallant patriot host, Not of brave leaders do we boast-- We trust in God alone. Sumter, and Bethel, and Bull Run Witnessed fierce battles fought and won, By aid of Power Divine: We met the foe, who us defied, In all his pomp, in all his pride, Shouting: “Manasseh's mine!” It was not thine, thou boasting foe! We laid thy vandal legions low-- We made them bite the sod: At Lexington the braggart yields, Leesburgh, Belmont and other fields-- Still help us, mighty God! Thou smiledst on the patriot seven-- Thou smilest on the brave eleven Free, independent States; Their number thou wilt soon increase And bless them with a lasting peace, Within their happy gates. No more shall violence then be heard, Wasting, destruction no more feared In all this Southern land: “Praise,” she her gates devoutly calls, “Salvation,” her Heaven-guarded walls-- What shall her power withstand? “The little one,”
th of June, a few days before he was relieved from the command, General Hooker reported directly to the President, and received instructions directly from him. I received no official information of his plans or of their execution. In the early part of June, Lee's army moved up the south bank of the Rappahannock, occupied the gaps of the Blue Ridge, and threatened the valley of the Shenandoah. General Hooker. followed on at interior lines, by Warrenton Junction, Thoroughfare Gap, and Leesburgh. But the operations of both armies were so masked by the intervening mountains, that neither could obtain positive information of the force and movements of the other. Winchester and Martinsburgh were at this time occupied by us simply as outposts. Neither place was susceptible of a good defence. Directions were therefore given, on the eleventh June, to withdraw their garrisons to Harper's Ferry, but these orders were not obeyed, and on the thirteenth Winchester was attacked, and its a
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