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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Missouri Volunteers. (search)
till June 11, 1864. Ordered to St. Louis, and duty there till September. Moved to Franklin, Mo., during Price's Raid. Moved to St. Louis, October 12, thence to Paducah, Ky., November 6, and to Nashville, Tenn. Garrison duty at Johnsonville, Tenn., January to June, 1865. Ordered to St. Louis, Mo., and duty there till August. Mustered out August 24, 1865. Battery B, 2nd Missouri Regiment Light Artillery Organized at St. Louis, Mo., January, 1862. Attached to District o64. Price's attack on Jefferson City October 7. Duty at Jefferson City till December. Moved to Nashville, Tenn. Battle of Nashville December 15-16. Garrison and guard duty at Spring Hill, Tenn., till January 5, 1865. Moved to Johnsonville, Tenn., January 5-13, and duty there till February 20. Moved to St. Louis, Mo. Mustered out March 6, 1865. Companies C and D transferred to 50th Missouri Infantry and Companies G and H to 48th Missouri Infantry. Regiment lost durin
Flank movement on Jonesboro August 25-30. Battle of Jonesboro August 31-September 1. Lovejoy Station September 2-6. At Decatur September 8 to October 4. Operations against Hood in North Georgia and North Alabama October 4-26. At Johnsonville till November 20. Nashville Campaign November-December. Columbia, Duck River, November 24-27. Columbia Ford November 28-29. Battle of Franklin November 30. Battle of Nashville December 15-16. Pursuit of Hood to the Tennessee ruary, 1865. Occupation of Nashville during Hood's investment December 1-15, 1864. Battle of Nashville December 15-16. Guarding prisoners at Nashville till February, 1865. Moved to Columbia, Tenn., February 15. Duty there and at Johnsonville till June 20. Moved to Nashville June 20, and there mustered out June 26. Disbanded at Camp Dennison, Ohio, July 5, 1865. Regiment lost during service 108 Enlisted men by disease. 174th Ohio Regiment Infantry. Organized at Camp
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Tennessee Volunteers. (search)
l, Ala., to Baton Rouge May 8-22. Ordered to Nashville, Tenn., May 27. Garrison duty at Johnsonville till July. Mustered out July 12, 1865. Regiment lost during service 1 Officer and 24 Ent Rodney, Miss., till May 25. Ordered to Nashville, Tenn., May 25. Garrison duty at Johnsonville, Tenn., till August. Mustered out August 1, 1865. Regiment lost during service 1 Officer aut Cumberland Gap guarding communications with Knoxville till January, 1865. Action at Johnsonville, Tenn., November 4-5, 1864. Mustered out by consolidation with 9th Tennessee Cavalry January ashville, Tenn., till March, 1865. Battle of Nashville December 15-16, 1864. Ordered to Johnsonville March 22, 1865, and duty there till July. Mustered out July, 1865. 1st Tennessee Battaler 1. Lobelville and Beardstown September 27. Centreville September 29. Moved to Johnsonville, Tenn., November, 1864, and duty on line of Duck River. Ordered to Gallatin December 9. Pa
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Wisconsin Volunteers. (search)
he Cumberland, to December, 1864. 3rd Brigade, Defenses Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad, to March, 1865. 3rd Brigade, 1st Subdistrict, District of Middle Tennessee, Dept. of the Cumberland, to June, 1865. Service. Stationed at Johnsonville, Tenn., guarding railroad and supplies October 15-November 30. Repulse of attack on Johnsonville November 4-5. Moved to Clarksville, Tenn., November 30, thence to Nashville, Tenn., December 28, and to Dechard January 1, 1865. Guard duty Johnsonville November 4-5. Moved to Clarksville, Tenn., November 30, thence to Nashville, Tenn., December 28, and to Dechard January 1, 1865. Guard duty at Elk River Bridge and along line of the Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad till June. Mustered out June 24, 1865. Regiment lost during service 1 Enlisted man killed and 2 Officers and 72 Enlisted men by disease. Total 75. 44th Wisconsin Regiment Infantry. Organized at Madison, Wis., by Companies October-November, 1864, and ordered to Nashville, Tenn., as fast as completed. Companies A, B, C, D and F reached Nashville during October and November. Battle of Nashville December 15-1
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, United States Colored Troops. (search)
road guard duty at various points in Tennessee and Alabama on line of the Nashville & Northwestern Railroad till December, 1864. Repulse of Hood's attack on Johnsonville November 2, 4 and 5. Action at Buford's Station, Section 37, Nashville & Northwestern Railroad, November 24. March to Clarksville, Tenn., and skirmish ne Service. Railroad guard duty in Tennessee and Alabama on line of Nashville & Northwestern Railroad till December, 1864. Repulse of Hood's attack on Johnsonville, Tenn., September 25, and November 4 and 5. Eddyville, Ky., October 17 (Detachment). Battle of Nashville December 15-16. Pursuit of Hood to the Tennessee Guard duty on Nashville & Northwestern Railroad in Tennessee till December, 1864. Skirmish on Nashville & Northwestern Railroad September 4. Action at Johnsonville November 4-5. Battle of Nashville, Tenn., December 15-16. Overton Hill December 16. Pursuit of Hood to the Tennessee River December 17-28. Again as
ghth Forrest reached the Tennessee at Fort Heiman, and captured a gunboat and three transports. On the second of November he planted batteries above and below Johnsonville, on the opposite side of the river, isolating three gunboats and eight transports. On the fourth the enemy opened his batteries upon the place, and was replie property on the levee and in storehouses was consumed by fire. On the fifth the enemy disappeared and crossed to the north side of the Tennessee river, above Johnsonville, moving toward Clifton, and subsequently joined Hood. On the night of the fifth General Schofield, with the advance of the Twenty-third corps, reached JohnsonJohnsonville, but finding the enemy gone, was ordered to Pulaski, and put in command of all the troops there, with instructions to watch the movements of Hood and retard his advance, but not to risk a general engagement until the arrival of General A. J. Smith's command from Missouri, and until General Wilson could get his cavalry remoun
ns were sent him on the fourth to leave his infantry at Johnsonville, move with his cavalry by water to Clifton, and thence he had succeeded in planting batteries above and below Johnsonville (one of our bases of supplies on the Tennessee river, autenant E. M. King attacked the enemy's batteries below Johnsonville, but were repulsed after a severe contest, but not befo to apprehend that the enemy could effect a crossing at Johnsonville, and the destruction of public property was consequentl river and disappeared. He crossed the Tennessee above Johnsonville by means of two large flatboats constructed by his men,hville on the fifth, and was immediately started toward Johnsonville by rail, reaching that place the same night, and findinthe two remaining brigades of Ruger's division, then at Johnsonville, also to move, one by railroad around through Nashville place on the twenty-fourth. The commanding officer at Johnsonville was directed to evacuate that post after removing all p
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
Reorganizing his beaten forces Smith again advanced with reinforcements from Memphis, and Forrest was compelled to foil the enemy by taking half his force and making a sixty-hour ride to Memphis, the daring entry of which compelled Smith's rapid retreat. Then for a time General Forrest made havoc with the Federal transportation, garrisons and depots in Tennessee, exploits crowned by the capture and destruction of six million dollars' worth of the enemy's supplies and a gunboat fleet, at Johnsonville,—a feat of arms, wrote Sherman, which I must confess excited my admiration. After the fall of Atlanta he joined Hood at Florence, and fought at Franklin and Nashville. As commander of the rear guard of the retreating Confederate army, Forrest displayed his most heroic qualities, with hardly a parallel but the famous deeds of Marshal Ney while covering Napoleon's retreat from Moscow. In February, 1865, he was promoted lieutenant-general, and given the duty of guarding the frontier from
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
bama regiment, forming one brigade under Col. A. P. Thompson, and the Tennessee brigade of Col. T. H. Bell. With this command Buford took part in Forrest's spring campaign in West Tennes see, including the capture of Fort Pillow, and was so prominent in the famous victory of Tishomingo Creek that Forrest declared his obligations principally due to Buford. During the Atlanta campaign he took part in the operations in northern Alabama and Tennessee in a number of engagements, among which Johnsonville is the most famous; and later he was with Forrest in the operations about Franklin and Murfreesboro, and the rear-guard fighting of Hood's retreat, until he was severely wounded at Richland creek, December 24th. In February, 1865, he was assigned to command of all Alabama cavalry within the limits of General Taylor's department. He was in the last fight at Selma, April 2d. After the close of the war he resumed the occupation of farming in Kentucky, and served again in the legislature o
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Table of Contents. (search)
Tenn. Plate 112. Field-works and lines, Bridgeport and Stevenson, Ala., and Nashville, Tenn. Fortress Rosecrans, near Murfreesborough, Tenn. Plans of forts, batteries, etc., Chattanooga, Tenn. Plate 113. Plans of forts, batteries, etc., Chattanooga and Nashville, Tenn. Plate 114. Plans of forts, batteries, etc., Nashville, Tenn. Fort Pickering, near Memphis, Tenn. Fort Donelson, Tenn., and vicinity. Field-works and lines, Memphis, Tenn. Plate 115. Johnsonville, Clarksville, Franklin, Columbia, and Gallatin, Tenn. Decatur, Athens, and Huntsville, Ala. Dalton, Ga. Plate 116. McDowell, Va., May 8, 1862. Gettysburg Campaign, June 3-August 1, 1863. Bath and Highland Counties, Va., and Pocahontas and Randolph Counties, W. Va., April 15-23, 1865. Staunton to McDowell, Va. Plate 117. Marches of Sherman's forces, 1863-65. Plate 118. Campaigns of the Army of the Cumberland, 1861-65. Cumberland Gap Campaign, March 28-Ju
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