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Wanted — to hire Negroes. --I wish to hire 100 Negroes, (men and Boys,) for the remainder of this year, to work on a Railroad in North Carolina, principally between the towns of Rockingham and Charlotte, and lying south and west of Danville, in this State. The country is high and healthy. Apply to Wm. S. Phillips, of Richmond, or myself. Robert Harvely, Contractor. mh 22--dts
Wanted. --to Hire Negroes.--I wish to hire 100 Negroes, (men and Boys,) for the remainder of this year, to work on a Railroad in North Carolina, principally between the towns of Rockingham and Charlotte, and lying south and west of Danville, in this State. The country is high and healthy. Apply to Wm. S. Phillips, of Richmond, or myself. Robert Harvey, Contractor. mh 22--dts
Wanted. --to Hire Negroes.--I wish to hire 100 Negroes, (men and Boys,) for the remainder of this year, to work on a Railroad in North Carolina, principally between the towns of Rockingham and Charlotte, and lying south and west of Danville, in this State. The country is high healthy. Apply to Wm. S. Phillips, of Richmond, or myself. Robert Harvey, Contractor. mh 22--dts
Randolph was here, judging from the many voices, proclaiming as one voice the answer, "the South ! the South ! " Immediately after Dr. Moffett concluded, James H. Skinner, Esq., of Augusta, was called for, and just as he commenced I was compelled to hasten to prepare this, before the mail would close. Doctor Moffett bore down strongly upon the Convention. He asked the sentiments of the people as to what the Convention should do. The answer was unanimous : "Secede and come home." As before stated, old Rockingham is now for secession, and so, I believe, are a majority of the State. Let the ball roll on. To-day was a glorious day in this county, and a reward to those who have so nobly borne aloft the banner of secession, which I hope may never trail in the dust. We send greeting to all to do likewise. Hastily, Pen. P. S.--The military were out this morning, with a brass band, and fired 100 guns in honor of the Southern Confederacy, under the secession flag. P.
he South, will say aye." "Those opposed, and in favor of Virginia remaining attached to the old Union, and with the North, will say no." Some seven or eight voting no, and the balance (about one thousand) voting aye. Where is the Union party of Rockingham ? If you could have heard the prolonged about of aye that almost rent the building, your heart would have rejoiced as did mine. Secession men are filled to overflowing with glory to-day, and old grey-haired sages proclaim yesterday the proudest day they ever saw in old Rockingham. Geo. H. Chisman and Chas. H. Lewis, both unconditional Union men, attempted to stifle the public voice by declaring it no time to take a vote of the sort; but the people recollected that when the Union element was in a majority, at the time of the canvass for members of the Convention, they lost no opportunity to have a vote of the people at public meetings. Truly, they change their tactics. They retired from the Court-House, with seven or eight others,
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.affairs in Rockingham. Harrisonburg, Va., April 27, 1861. Something of quiet reigns here since all the soldiers have gone to the "tented field. " One great cause of the seeming quietness was occasioned by the continued failure of the mails from the outside world, leaving us totally in the dark as to the events transpiring in the country. For four or five days we were without a mail from Baltimore or Richmond. The "usurpers" at Washington stopped the Baltimore mail, and the mail contractors, not expecting pay for carrying the mail through the Valley, do not trouble themselves. But we have no right to complain of inconveniences in time of revolution. To day the Regimental muster came off, with its usual concomitants of ginger-bread and whiskey. I understand that this will be our last sight at the militia farce, as the peace muster is to be demolished by the decapitation of the field officers and the substitution of regular milita
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.Affairs in Rockingham. Harrisonburg, Va., May 1, 1861. Our crops look well, and the prospect is good for plenty of everything. The men who have gone to war from the county will not retard farm operations, as there remains plenty of hands to do the work. Our fruit I do not think has been injured by frost, and we begin to feel secure from frosty mornings and frosted fruit. Our Home Guard will parade on Friday.--The corps is large, and the appearance of a large body of men, armed with home rifles (the best, too, by the way,) and shot guns, will present an odd appearance. We have but one paper now in Rockingham. The Register has the field, and is alone in its full blaze of glory. But it is only a weekly, and, of course, is too slow to satisfy the "fast." Our mails are irregular — the papers get here behind time — and all these things contribute to general impatience. Our corporate authorities are making a good disposition
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.affairs in Rockingham. Harrisonburg, Va., May 6, 1861. A calm, determined spirit is depicted upon the countenance of our people to stand by the flag of Virginia, in this the hour of her peril and tribulation. Nothing of the vapid excitement we read of in the Northern sensation papers — no frothy excitement — but the calm, inflexible determination of a free people to be forever free. Such a people are a dangerous people to an enemy. No danger of a sacrifice of the honor of the South from such hands. Our town is quiet, and the numbers gone to war have contributed to make it so. Business has dwindled down to an insignificant figure. Garland Dunn, a gentleman of high respectability, committed suicide by hanging on Thursday morning last, at his residence, at the foot of the mountain dividing Rockingham and Greene counties. He lived just inside of Greene county. He was near sixty years of age. Men from here are yet wending
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.affairs in Rockingham. Harrisonburg, May 23, 1861. As your correspondent "Pen" is at the post of duty and honor, and you have had no news from this point for several days, I will give you, to the best of my ability, the news of the town. The Cavalry company have just left, having received orders on Tuesday. They are commanded by Capt. Tom Yancey, of this town, a very able and facetious lawyer and State's Attorney. Col. Gray addressed them in his usual flowery style. Capt. Yancey, in his address, speaking of his command, said "some are sick and have good excuse, but for the other men who are not present, we leave them in the care of the ladies of Rockingham, whom I feel assured will protect them and take care that they do not get hurt. Old Rockingham has done exceedingly well, sending over 800 men to the field. Two of the strongest "Union men" in the Convention were her representatives. Last Monday an affray took place
Sickness in the country. --Much sickness, chiefly typhoid fever and diphtheria, prevails at Timberville and vicinity. There had been a death in that region every day for the last three weeks, up to Monday last. Diphtheria still prevails extensively on Briery Branch, in the western part of this county. Quite a number of deaths have occurred, as many as four in the same family, (Mr. David Vanfossen's,) within the last three or four weeks. It spares neither age nor sex.-- Rockingham (Va.) Register.
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