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f of Staff a report which explained the movements of troops up to that date, and who stated the fact of the non-arrival of the pontoon trains. These pontoon trains and supplies, which were expected to meet us on our arrival at Falmouth, could have been readily moved overland in time for our purposes in perfect safety, as they would all the time have been between our army and the Potomac River, and had they started from Washington at the promised time they would have certainly reached Stafford Court House as soon as the advance of General Franklin's grand division, and from that point they could have been forwarded by his teams to Falmouth, if the teams from Washington had needed rest. On the twenty-second not hearing from these trains, I sent a report to General Halleck. It appeared afterward that no supplies had been started overland as suggested in my plan of operations; and the pontoon train did not leave Washington until the afternoon of the nine-teenth--two days after the arr
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 21: events at Falmouth. (search)
bridge. Fresh men stepped forward to take the place of those shot, but the sharpshooters killed and wounded so many that it almost resulted in the destruction of the engineer detachment. The artillery then began shelling the rebels from Stafford Heights, but without effect, as they could not depress the guns sufficiently. Meanwhile, the regimental commanders of the Third brigade had been assembled at brigade headquarters to receive preliminary instructions for the approaching battle. Thides and orderlies increased, and at half past 4 the opening roar of artillery in front announced that the dread business had begun. The heavy columns of the Ninth Corps swept rapidly to the front. French moved his division to the heights of Stafford, Hancock followed close and just at dawn the gallant division of Howard moved up. Word that the Engineers had succeeded in laying the bridges below the city and that Franklin and Hooker were crossing was received, but the bridge over which th
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 27: the Gettysburg Campaign. (search)
eteenth Massachusetts regiment bivouacked on the night of June 14, under orders to start the following morning in very light marching order, and did so in company with two pieces of Battery A, First Rhode Island Artillery, to form the extreme rear guard of the Army, Companies F and K being detailed under command of Major Rice to march half a mile in rear of the column. They marched, on the first day, until nearly sunset, over dusty roads and frequently through burning woods. Passing Stafford Court House, they camped on Aquia Creek where the men bathed in the coffee colored water, thence on the 17th, passing Dumfries and halting for the night at Wolf Run Shoals, on the Occoquan river; on the 18th to Fairfax Station; on the 19th to Centreville; on the 20th to Haymarket, and on the 21st to Thoroughfare Gap, where the regiment remained for three days, in position to repel any advance through the gap. Frequent halts had been made during the first part of the march to allow the pioneers
....................... 331, 341 Spofford, Daniel W.,............................................... 142, 143 Spofford, E. F.,....................................................... 43 Spofford, John A.,............................................. 4, 18, 43 Spofford, Phineas,.................................................... 142 Sprague, Gov., William,.............................................. 50 Spottsylvania,............................................. 305, 306, 307 Stafford Court House,............................................ 213 Stanley, Edwin P.,...................................................... 108 Stanley, Thomas,..................................................... 325 Stannard, General,.................................................... 246 Stanwood, Moses P.,............................................ 4, 7, 43 Steele, John H.,........................................... 248, 285, 359 Stevens, Austin,.............................................
ed, rendering the movement of troops fatiguing and difficult, but on the 15th camp was struck and the march resumed, first to Cattlet's Station and then to Stafford Court House. Here a stay of about two weeks was made during which Colonel Upton drilled the regiment diligently. The day's program was, Company drill in the morning; in the discrepancies between his account and that of Colonel Cronkite, the members of the regiment may decide which is correct. After a short stay at Stafford Court House, we marched to Belle Plain, reaching there at dusk of a day that will always linger in the memory of every one of us who participated in that march. Firstg we were moved some distance to the hillside in the timber and there made ourselves comfortable with little effort. To this day, I believe the march from Stafford Court House and the camping on the flats by the river at Belle Plain Landing was the cause of the breaking down of a great many men. The misery of it is beyond descrip
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry, Chapter 7: the Gettysburg campaign (search)
But in this case the disadvantage was increased by midnight start, in pouring rain, and dense darkness, lit only by vivid flashes of lightning with accompanying peals of thunder. The roads were rendered difficult for both man and teams, and for two days the march was tedious and toilsome. To quote again from Comrade Beckwith, Abandoned and burning camps along our line of march and the moving of the general field hospital, indicated a general movement, and our march was continued to Stafford Court House, to Dumfries, thence to Fairfax Station. Here a day's rest was very grateful to us, because we had been passing over ground which had been the continual scene of march, camp and battle, and had been stripped of everything that would sustain troops. The roads were deep with the red-clay dust which created a choking thirst, as it rose in a thick cloud from the tread of the moving thousands of all arms. Water that was fit to use was scarce, and difficult to obtain, and in consequence
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 20: General Burnside assumes command of the army of the Potomac (search)
cupied, and the ability of Sumner's command fully equal to the enterprise. Forty thousand men could have crossed before dark on that Monday, made a strong bridgehead on the lower plane of the right bank and, intrenching Marye Heights beyond the city against Lee's approach, have had within twelve hours rejoisted and replanked the denuded railway piers for use for supply or reinforcement from the Falmouth side. The left grand division (Franklin's) encamped a few miles north of us at Stafford Court House; while the center grand division (Hooker's) was halted eight miles above us. Hooker, not to be outdone by Sumner, soon entreated Burnside to allow him to cross the river near his own bivouac, that he might move down and seize the Fredericksburg Heights. This request was too late. We had had a heavy rain and the river was rising rapidly. Still, Hooker's project would have been better than the one we adopted. The inhabitants of the country were too zealous for Confederate success
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 22: battle of Chancellorsville (search)
d to the Army of the Potomac; and Hooker's success as a division and corps commander was kept constantly in mind as an earnest of a grand future. As soon as General Sickles, who was then my junior in rank, was assigned to the Third Corps, feeling that I had been overlooked, I wrote a brief letter to General Hooker, asking to be assigned according to my rank. Immediately I was ordered to take command of the Eleventh Army Corps, which General Sigel had just left. I assumed command at Stafford Court House, where General Carl Schurz was in charge. My coming sent Schurz back to his division and Schimmelfennig back to his brigade. The corps was then, in round numbers, 13,000 strong. It had about 5,000 Germans and 8,000 Americans. Two divisions were under the German commanders, Von Steinwehr and Carl Schurz, and one under Devens. One of Devens's brigades was commanded by Colonel Von Gilsa, a German officer, who at drills and reviews made a fine soldierly appearance. Outwardly I met
posted near the right, supported by two Virginia regiments. Early and Taliaferro's divisions composed Jackson's second line-D. H. Hill's division his reserve. Gen. Stuart, with two brigades of cavalry and his horse artillery, occupied the plain on Jackson's right, extending to Massaponax Creek. On the morning of the 13th, the plain on which the Federal army lay, was still enveloped in fog, making it impossible to discern its operations. At an early hour the batteries on the heights of Stafford began to play upon Longstreet's position. In the intervals of the fire, noises from the valley and loud-toned commands told of marching and counter-marching in the fog and mists. The rattle of picket-firing on our right gave tokens of the impending battle. All was feverish expectation. A little past nine o'clock the sun lifted the foggy veil from the valley, and there stood the Federal array, right, left, and centre, just on the point of moving. Dense masses appeared in front of A. P
said that the pontoon trains that had been ordered from Washington had not yet arrived. At all events, there was now a delay of about three weeks after reaching Stafford, C. H., before our command again broke camp; during which time there was a gathering of the Confederate clans, far and near, on the south side of the Rappahannock, and undoubtedly the heights behind the town were rendered impregnable. In the vicinity of Stafford, C. H., was an abundance of wood, much white oak, which makes a slow-burning, hot fire, and leaves a white ash. Our company and the First Maryland, which lay side by side, had their experience in working up for fuel more or lesuite an enthusiast, in his desire to perfect himself he made the woods ring in these days, with the practice notes of his instrument. It was during this wait at Stafford that we received, each man, a nice, warm, woolen, knit blouse; these were said to have been part of the cargo of a captured blockade runner. They were gratefull
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