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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 2 0 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 2 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley) 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 0 Browse Search
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Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist, Chapter 8: colorphobia. (search)
anity and humanity. This outrage was perpetrated in 1831. Two years afterward Connecticut enacted altogether the most shameful crime in her history. There lived in the year 1833, in the town of Canterbury, in that State, an accomplished young Quaker woman, named Prudence Crandall. Besides a superior education, she possessed the highest character. And this was well; for she was the principal of the Female Boarding School located in that town. The institution was, in 1833, at the beginning lature, which was then in session, making it a penal offence, punishable by fine and imprisonment, for any one in that State keeping a school to take as his or her pupils the children of colored people of other States. But the heart of the young Quaker woman was the heart of a heroine. She dared to disregard the wicked law, was arrested, bound over for trial, and sent to jail like a common malefactor. It was no use, persecution could not cow the noble prisoner into submission to the infamous
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist, Chapter 9: agitation and repression. (search)
d himself to obtain for the convention a full representation of the friends of freedom. He sent the call to George W. Benson, at Providence, urging him to spread the news among the Abolitionists of his neighborhood and to secure the election of a goodly number of delegates by the society in Rhode Island. He forthwith bethought him of Whittier on his farm in Haverhill, and enjoined his old friend to fail not to appear in Philadelphia. But while the young poet longed to go to urge upon his Quaker brethren of that city to make their solemn testimony against slavery visible over the whole land — to urge them, by the holy memories of Woolman and Benezet and Tyson to come up as of old to the standard of Divine Truth, though even the fires of another persecution should blaze around them, he feared that he would not be able to do so. The spirit was surely willing but the purse was empty, as thee know, he quaintly adds, our farming business does not put much cash in our pockets. The cash h
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 12: General George B. McClellan and the organization of the army of the Potomac (search)
n. The Confederates had occupied this famous ground between the two armies and kept flying from the hilltop their new banner so unwelcome to Union gazers. Reference to this audacious flag pointed the speech of many a brave orator that fall while criticising the slowness of McClellan. Munson's Hill armed the On-to-richmond press with pithy paragraphs. But suddenly and unexpectedly the Confederates withdrew from Munson's Hill and our cavalry pickets found there only mock intrenchments and Quaker guns --i. e., logs cut and daubed with black paint to imitate cannon. The natural query was: What will our enemy do next? To ascertain this, reconnoissances were undertaken. The divisions of McCall and W. F. Smith marched out westward on October 19th. McCall, farthest south, bearing off northwesterly, passed through the village of Dranesville, and finding no enemy kept on five or six miles beyond toward Leesburg. He delayed his return march from time to time to enable his staff to gat
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 51: the early finances; schools started (search)
ned the military commander to this effect. From one plantation alone, opposite New Orleans, came a petition thirty feet long, covered with signatures. Many a signer, of course, merely made a cross opposite his name. This earnestness of ignorant men in behalf of their children's education was indeed remarkable and full of promise. The Society of Friends maintained an evening school in Baltimore for colored porters and draymen, having an average of forty in attendance; while young men of Quaker families constituted the corps of volunteer teachers. The latter part of the year, when the President's attitude was known to be unfriendly to anything except work, there arose in several districts of Maryland sharp and organized opposition to all freedmen's schools. Both teachers and children were chased and stoned in one town, Easton, by rough white men. Resolutions to drive out the teacher were passed in a public meeting in Dorchester; while unknown parties burned the church and schoo
th Horton to disturb the peace of Cambridge by crying through the streets that the Lord was coming with fire and sword to judge his people, nor would she desist till she was flogged out of town at the cart's tail. Still worse: there was Benanuel Bowers, gentleman and land-owner (up north, near the Charlestown line), whom no threats could restrain from declaring himself a Baptist, and who for giving a glass of milk to starving Elizabeth Horton was fined £ 5. This bold Benanuel himself turned Quaker, and was for twenty years a thorn in the orthodox flesh of our little town. Over and over again he was fined 20s. for staying away from church, and now and then for entertaining Quakers at his house, £ 4 and costs. In 1677, for refusing to pay his fine, he was thrown into jail and kept there for more than a year. He solaced himself by writing verses, of which the following are a specimen, and sending them by his wife to Thomas Danforth, one of the magistrates:-- It is nigh hard this fi
improve the river bank, 106; its city council opposes the construction of Harvard Bridge, 107; completes the Charlesbank, 107; no provision for girls in its early schools, 189; high school opened for girls in, 192. Boston Massacre, 20.. Boston Porcelain and Glass Company, 30. Boston Port Bill, 22. Boston Tea-party, 22. Bounties for wolves, 9. Bower of Bliss, The, 37. Bowers, Benanuel, declares himself a Baptist, 12; fined and imprisoned for entertaining Quakers, 12; turns Quaker, 12; sends verses to Thomas Danforth, 12; harangues the people in the meeting-house, 13. Bradstreet, Mrs., the ponderous verses of, 2. Bradstreet, Simon, site of his house, 2. Braintree Street, 3, 6; name changed to Harvard, S. Brattle, General, notifies Gage of removal of powder from Charlestown, 23; apologizes to the Cambridge people, 24. Brattle, Rev. William, 236; his salary, 237; donations to, 237. Brattle Street (the Watertown highway), 8, 28; Tory Row on, 28. Bri
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 2: Germs of contention among brethren.—1836. (search)
ly without much delay present his thoughts elaborately in a pamphlet. Like many other projects incompatible with his absorbing occupation, this came to nothing. His clerical foes, however, would not relax their pursuit of him. Not only his Quaker views of the Sabbath, but his Quaker non-resistance and so-called non-government doctrines, as set forth in his article on Peace, were open Lib. 6.126. to attack. The Vermont Chronicle warned the Liberator's Lib. 6.146. subscribers of their rQuaker non-resistance and so-called non-government doctrines, as set forth in his article on Peace, were open Lib. 6.126. to attack. The Vermont Chronicle warned the Liberator's Lib. 6.146. subscribers of their responsibility for such heresies. Mr. Garrison met the base and insidious efforts of the religious press to create distrust and division between himself and his abolition brethren (prompted by jealousy of his early, consistent, and effective advocacy of the antislavery cause), by assuming the entire responsibility for all his utterances on slavery or any other topic. Nevertheless, I trust it will be understood, he said, that I Lib. 6.147. do not make these remarks by way of apology for anythin
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Hall.—the non-resistance society.—1838. (search)
t stop to inquire whether he is a Trinitarian or Unitarian, Baptist or Methodist, Catholic or Covenanter, Presbyterian or Quaker, Swedenborgian or Perfectionist. However widely we may differ in our views on other subjects, we shall not refuse to labith his hands lazily flung behind him, and singing his badly enunciated words in the usual absurd and unnatural manner of Quaker preachers. Although he was a flaming abolitionist in England, he has acted in this country very much as Cox and Hoby did between Theodore and Angelina will be consummated on Monday evening next. Neither Whittier nor May 14, 1838. any other Quaker can be present to witness the ceremony, pain of excommunication from the Society of Friends. What an absurd and despotictermarriage, namely, between the two races—against which the law should have been invoked as much as against the mob. His Quaker ally, Elliott Cresson, as foreman of the Grand Jury, follows the Alton example Lib. 8.171. in presenting both the rioter
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 7: the World's Convention.—1840. (search)
m thereupon declared that if women had no right there he had none: his credentials were from the same persons and the same Society. George Stacey, an influential Quaker, explained that the system in England was uniform, in business matters, to exclude women unless announced as associated. Dr. John Bowring said the custom was morwith an autograph inscription. and family, Life of J. and L. Mott, p. 163. Elizabeth Fry and her family, Lord Morpeth, the Duchess of Sutherland, and many other Quaker and non-Quaker friends of the host, Samuel Gurney. But let us hear Mr. Garrison's account: W. L. Garrison to his wife. London, July 3, 1840. Ms. Y hospitality of our English friends is unbounded. Several splendid entertainments have been given to us—one, by the celebrated Mrs. Opie, and another by the rich Quaker banker, Samuel Gurney. He sent seven barouches July 2, 1840; Life of J. and L. Mott, p. 165. to convey us to his residence, (one of the most beautiful in the wo
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: fiction I — Brown, Cooper. (search)
d pamphlets called forth by the war with Tripoli. See also Book II, Chap. III. Historically important is the preface, which declared that the American taste for novels had grown in the past seven years from apathy to a general demand. Apparently the time was slowly ripening to the point at which taste begins to support those who gratify it, and it is notable that the first American to make authorship his sole career had already decided for fiction. Charles Brockden Brown came of good Quaker stock long settled in Pennsylvania, where, at Philadelphia, he was born 17 January, 1771. He was a frail, studious child, reputed a prodigy, and encouraged by his parents in that frantic feeding upon books which was expected, in those days, of every American boy of parts. By the time he was sixteen he had made himself a tolerable classical scholar, contemplated three epics — on Columbus, Pizarro, and Cortez-and hurt his health by over-work. As he grew older he read with a hectic, desultor
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