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the South should most assiduously economize, the precious lives of her noble defenders. As it was, one of the most brilliant victories of the age was achieved with a loss of life almost incredible, when the weight of the enemy's column and the length of the battle are considered. The enemy seemed to stake the issue of the day on turning shall our flank on the left. It was then that Johnston, after having baffled Patterson, as Blucher baffled Grouchy, did more than was done by Blucher at Waterloo. The centre led by Davis, the right commanded by Beauregard, did the rest. The enemy was exhausted, appalled, tumultuously routed by the inflexible resistance, the deadly fire, the terrible charges with which their attack was met. And yet but a small portion of our forces at and near Manassas Junction were actually engaged. Perhaps there were at no time as many as twenty thousand of them under fire or in sight of the enemy, while it is possible that double that number of the enemy's total
e effort of a reserve in the close of an obstinately disputed day; which made Kellerman's charge at Marengo snatch victory from the grasp of the triumphant Austrians; and the onset of Sir Hussey Vivian's brigade, on the flank of the old guard at Waterloo, overthrow at once the military fabric of the French empire! But it will be said, Gen. McDowell's army was not only worsted, it fled in wild disorder from the field. I apprehend most defeated armies do that. The Roman veterans of the army opeius did it at the battle of Pharsalia, and when those of them who had escaped to the neighboring mountain capitulated the next day, they threw down their arms, and wept as they begged for their lives. A greater than Pompeius was vanquished at Waterloo; but the French writers all but unanimously claim that they had the advantage till the arrival of the Prussian reinforcement at the close of the day. Then, says the English historian of the battle, the whole French army became one mass of inextr
intelligent negro prisoner, named Selden, who belongs to Mr. Braxton Garlick, standing up in the wagon in which he had been brought to the city, entertained a large crowd of citizens with an account of the state of things in the neighborhood of Waterloo. His master, Mr. Garlick, is a refugee at present in Richmond. His farm, in Waterloo, is situated on the Pamunkey, six miles above the White House. He left home on the approach of the enemy, who, until dislodged on Friday, have been in quiet Waterloo, is situated on the Pamunkey, six miles above the White House. He left home on the approach of the enemy, who, until dislodged on Friday, have been in quiet possession of his premises. We give Selden's account: His business was that of a weaver, but the Yankees on their arrival, destroyed his loom and put him to work in his master's corn and flour-mill, where he was employed when taken by our cavalry. Mr. Cross, a negro named Moses, and himself were running the mill. The Yankees took all the flour the mill could turn out, and paid cash for it. The Yankees had not injured anything of Mr. Garlick's except the loom, but they had treated Selden, in
ll's corps d'armee, that had arrived two days before from Waterloo and Warrenton, McDowell himself being present, and in comave a corps of observation here to watch the crossings at Waterloo and Sulphur Springs. The forces arriving from Washington think it may be useful. Gen. Milroy burnt the bridge at Waterloo before he retired from that place last night, and Buford says the fords near Waterloo are bad. I have directed the available forces of Sigel's cavalry, with a section of his artillery, to report to Gen. Buford this afternoon on the Waterloo road, with three days cooked rations. I have directed Buford tone. However persons may have differed as to the force at Waterloo, Sulphur Springs, or elsewhere, all agree in one thing — vement of the enemy toward our right from Rappahannock to Waterloo. Battalions, trains, batteries, all have the same directford, (Freeman's,) and the bridges at Sulphur Springs and Waterloo. In the night of the twenty-fourth of August, his camp-f
in motion, in the direction of Culpeper, and passing the encampment of Gen. Sigel, at Sperryville, twenty miles from Culpeper Court-House, by the way. At Culpeper Court-House Gen. Pope found Brig.-General Crawford, with his brigade of Banks's corps d'armee, (previously General Hatch's,) and Gen. Bayard's brigade of McDowell's cavalry, the extreme advance of his army of Virginia; also Brig.-Gen. Ricketts's division of Major-Gen. McDowell's corps d'armee, that had arrived two days before from Waterloo and Warrenton, McDowell himself being present, and in command of all the forces then there. At noon on Friday Generals Pope and McDowell received intelligence from the gallant Bayard —— who, with the two regiments of his cavalry command doing duty immediately under him, a New-Jersey and a Pennsylvania regiment, had been in the saddle night and day, guarding the Rapidan, for a week, from the Raccoon Ford down to a point fourteen miles below and south of the railroad — that the enemy at da<
shall leave a corps of observation here to watch the crossings at Waterloo and Sulphur Springs. The forces arriving from Washington and Alexrived. I think it may be useful. Gen. Milroy burnt the bridge at Waterloo before he retired from that place last night, and Buford says the fords near Waterloo are bad. I have directed the available forces of Sigel's cavalry, with a section of his artillery, to report to Gen. Buford this afternoon on the Waterloo road, with three days cooked rations. I have directed Buford to march at dawn to-morrow toward Chester Gap, l determine. However persons may have differed as to the force at Waterloo, Sulphur Springs, or elsewhere, all agree in one thing — the movement of the enemy toward our right from Rappahannock to Waterloo. Battalions, trains, batteries, all have the same direction. The force of thve-named ford, (Freeman's,) and the bridges at Sulphur Springs and Waterloo. In the night of the twenty-fourth of August, his camp-fires exte
ith marvellous energy brought his pieces into position, all pointing toward the approaching avalanche--forty pieces ready to open their thunders. General Hooker was at Chancellorsville. In an instant he was in the saddle. There was no force at hand but Berry that could be thrown instantly into the break. It was his old command, hardened, indurated, made perfect through suffering in all the hard-fought contests of the Peninsula. With a heroism unsurpassed, equal to the Imperial Guard at Waterloo, amid all the disaster, rout, panic, and commotion, they moved into position--one single block to resist the moving mass, to stop it square till Birney, Berdan, and Williams could be recalled; till Slocum could change front; till the dam could be thrown across the stream! With yells and cheers the enemy advanced and met the canister and shells of thirty pieces of artillery. It was a terrible fire. There stood Berry's division, as firm as a rock. Again and again the rebels dashed again
tober the Sixth, Fifth, and Second corps recrossed the Rappahannock, advancing as far as Brandy Station, while Buford's cavalry drove a small force of the enemy into Culpeper. During the night despatches were received from General Gregg, commanding a cavalry division guarding the upper fords of the Rappahannock and Hazel rivers, that he had been forced back early in the morning from Hazel River, and in the afternoon from Rappahannock, and that the enemy were crossing at Sulphur Springs and Waterloo in heavy force. As it was too late when this intelligence reached me to attempt to gain Warrenton in advance of the enemy, the army on the thirteenth was withdrawn to Auburn and Catlett's Station, and on the fourteenth to Centreville. This retrograde movement was effected without molestation from the enemy till the fourteenth, on.which day he skirmished at Auburn with the Second corps, Major-General Warren, and on the afternoon of that day attacked General Warren at Bristol Station. The
A. P. Hill's division and those of the enemy. The enemy was massed between Warrenton and the Springs, and guarded the fords of the Rappahannock as far above as Waterloo. The army of General McClellan had left Westover, part of which had already marched to join General Pope, and it was reported that the rest would soon follow. ected to join this army, and were approaching. In pursuance of the plan of operations determined upon, Jackson was directed, on the twenty-fifth, to cross above Waterloo, and move around the enemy's right, so as to strike the Alexandria and Orange Railroad in his rear. Longstreet, in the mean time, was to divert his attention bys soon as the latter should be sufficiently advanced. Battle of Manassas. General Jackson crossed the Rappahannock at Kinson's Mill, about four miles above Waterloo, and passing through Orlean, encamped on the night of the twenty-fifth near Salem, after a long and fatiguing march. The next morning, continuing his route with
ernoon of the twenty-sixth, when the march was resumed, crossing the Rappahannock at Hinson's Mill Ford, six miles above Waterloo. A dash of several squadrons of Federal cavalry into Salem, in front of us, on the twenty-seventh, delayed our march abdirection, the route of General Jackson, through Amissville, across the Rappahannock, at Hinson's Mill, four miles above Waterloo, proceeded through Orlean, and thence on the road to Salem, till, getting near that place, I found my way blocked by theOn the twenty-fifth, we marched this division in rear, from Jeffersonton across the Rappahannock, at the ford next above Waterloo, and bivouacked near Salem. On the twenty-sixth, marched within a mile of Bristoe Station, on the Orange and Alexandriame to point out to General Early's Assistant Adjutant-General, Major Hall, a road by which the brigade might be moved to Waterloo in case it should be forced back. This was done, and on my return to the Springs, a little before sunset, I found the b
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