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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death. 2 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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passing the range of Fort Pulaski before daylight; and, leaving the other vessels in Warsaw Sound, I returned to this place by the way of Tybee Roads and Calibogue Sound. As a demonstration, the appearance of the naval and military force in Wilmington and Warsaw Sound, has had complete success. Savannah was thrown into a state of great alarm, and all the energies of the place have been exerted to the utmost, to increase its military defences, for which purpose troops have been withdrawn froes had been made in another quarter, which seemed nearly, if not quite, as important as those to which I have already alluded. A passage on the right side of the Savannah has always been known to exist, leading from Warsaw Sound through the Wilmington River, until it narrows into St. Augustine Creek, and finally empties into the Savannah, just below Fort Jackson. The passage was defended, and is still, by a battery; but, through the negroes, information was obtained of another, leading up also
mplete control of Warsaw and Ossibaw Sounds, and the mouths of Vernon and Wilmington Rivers, which form important approaches to that city. I enclose the report ofreports. United States steamer Seminole, abreast Skidaway battery, Wilmington River, Ga., March 25, 1862. sir: In obedience to your order dated second inst.,ull, we this afternoon felt our way with the lead up the narrow channel of Wilmington River, to the battery on Skidaway Island, accompanied by the Norwich, LieutenantCaptain Gillis boarded her and led the way in line of battle, and stood up Wilmington River to attack the batteries at Skidaway Island, which have been building for smy. The works on Skidaway Island extend for about half a mile along the Wilmington River, and are built well and very powerful. Had the enemy remained and fought,t our noble sailors will do when led by a brave commander. The channel of Wilmington River, as well as Skidaway Island, is now thrown into our hands. Our glorious c
ril 12, 1862: 1861.   June17.Sch. Parker, Smith, Fernandina, naval stores. June18.Sch. W. H. Northrop, Silliman, Wilmington, lumber. Aug.7.Sch. W. H. Northrop, Silliman, Wilmington, lumber. Aug.13.Sch. Victoria, Certain, Wilmington, rice. Wilmington, lumber. Aug.13.Sch. Victoria, Certain, Wilmington, rice. Sept.4.Sch. Mary Adeline, Carlin, Charleston, rice. Sept.9.Sch. Hampton, Gladding, Savannah, rice. Sept.19.Sch. Atkinson, Fitzinger, Georgetown, rice. Sept.20.Sch. Victoria, Vincent, Beaufort, S. C., rice. Oct.2.Sch. Carrie Sandford, HaggetWilmington, rice. Sept.4.Sch. Mary Adeline, Carlin, Charleston, rice. Sept.9.Sch. Hampton, Gladding, Savannah, rice. Sept.19.Sch. Atkinson, Fitzinger, Georgetown, rice. Sept.20.Sch. Victoria, Vincent, Beaufort, S. C., rice. Oct.2.Sch. Carrie Sandford, Haggett, Wilmington, lumber. Oct.8.Sch. Mary Louisa, Bettilini, Jacksonville, naval stores. Oct.12.Sch. British Empire, Parsons, Jacksonville, lumber. Oct.15.Sch. J. W. Anderson, Black, Savannah, naval stores. Oct.15.Sch. Adeline, Smith, Savannah, Wilmington, lumber. Oct.8.Sch. Mary Louisa, Bettilini, Jacksonville, naval stores. Oct.12.Sch. British Empire, Parsons, Jacksonville, lumber. Oct.15.Sch. J. W. Anderson, Black, Savannah, naval stores. Oct.15.Sch. Adeline, Smith, Savannah, naval stores. Nov.4.Sch. Lucy R. Waring, Smith, Savannah, naval stores. Nov.6.Sch. John R. Wilder, Gardner, Savannah, rice. Nov.7.Sch. H. F. Willing, Gill, Savannah, rice. Nov.7.Sch. Gen. Ripley, Phillips, Charleston, rice. Nov.8.Sloop Mary,
hundred and fifteen men, under the command of Capt. Pratt, were landed, with orders to march at once to the south-west end of the island, skirting Turner's Creek on the right, so as to cover the boat party which was to follow that stream to Wilmington River. Ascending to the junction of Oakland and Turner's Creeks, the balance of the command, in all about three hundred men, was landed at Gibson's plantation. The first company ashore was directed to move at once to the south-west end of Whit the Rhode Island volunteers, with one light six-pounder, were left in charge of the steamer. The gun could not be landed on account of the inability of the boat to lie alongside of the landing. Having proceeded through Turner's Creek to Wilmington River, I returned by the same route, and landed at Gibson's. Directly after arriving there I was informed that our patrols had discovered the enemy in force at or near Fleetwood's, and had seen traces of them all the way to Turner's. Col. Fenton h
as fought. This relieved the country in the rear of the line from menace, and one might say that the Confederacy was limited to the segment of a circle the circumference of which would pass through Richmond, Petersburg, Savannah, Atlanta, and Nashville. The policy maintained was continually to reduce the size of this circle until the Confederacy was crushed. Sherman turned north, marching through the Carolinas. Part of the troops that had fought at Nashville under Thomas were sent to Wilmington, under Schofield, after the fall of Fort Fisher. Sheridan's troopers were pressed forward up the Shenandoah Valley, to cross over to the headwaters of the James River, and down that stream to join the armies of the Potomac and of the James in front of Richmond and Petersburg. Stoneman moved from east Tennessee into the Virginias. The circle was contracted and the Confederacy was pressed on every side. This constituted the second phase of the great campaign, and the grand finale was abo
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most famous naval action of the Civil war (search)
decisive engagement with one of the formidable ironclads that were constructed by the Confederacy was denied to the original Monitor. It fell to the monitor Weehawken, one of seven similar vessels designed by Ericsson for the navy. Under Captain John Rodgers, she, with her sister-vessels, ran first under fire in the attack made upon Fort Sumter and the batteries in Charleston Harbor by Rear-Admiral Du Pont in April, 1863. In June, she and the Nahant were blockading the mouth of Wilmington River, Georgia. Early on the morning of the 17th, Captain Rodgers was apprised that the huge Confederate ram, into which the old blockade-runner Fingal had been converted, was coming down to raise the blockade. Clearing for action, the Weehawken steamed slowly toward the northeastern end of Wassaw Sound, followed by the Nahant. When about a mile and a half from the Weehawken, the Atlanta, which was aground, fired a rifleshot at her. The Weehawken, without replying, approached to within three h
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Experiences of a Northern man in the Confederate army. (search)
al and departure for the blockade runners plying constantly between there and Wilmington, Charleston, and occasionally other southern ports. When within this neutralrquisite. In due course we embarked on our steamer for the short voyage to Wilmington. A trial trip of about an hour's duration was made round the delicately bluensufficient light. After a favorable voyage we reached the desired point off Wilmington at the proper time. A brief stoppage was made, when soon the final preparatiwere business people, seeking no adventures except in a commercial sense. At Wilmington we found the moral atmosphere a very great improvement upon that of Nassau, wof actual war. Still, the first sight of the Confederate arms as witnessed at Wilmington, was tame in sensations as compared with the deep impressions produced in himwere anxious to get to the front, so after waiting a few hours for a train at Wilmington, my English acquaintance and I had to part. He went direct to Richmond, wher
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
that our visits to Augusta, Athens, Rome, and Greenville, S C., were made very pleasant by our kind friends, and that the whole trip was a decided success, financially, and in every other respect. Acknowledgments of all of the courtesies received would fill pages, but, reserving others for future mention, we must here thank Supt. J. R. Kenly, of the Richmond and Petersburg railroad; Supt. R. M. Sully, of the Petersburg railroad; President R. R. Bridges, of the Weldon and Wilmington, and Wilmington and Columbia railroads; John B. Peck, General Manager of the S. C. R. R.; Colonel J. W Green, General Manager of the Georgia railroad; General E. P. Alexander, President of the Central & S. W. Ga. R. R.; Gov. Jos. E. Brown, President of the Atlantic and Western railroad; Dr. Hillyer, President of the Kingston and Rome railroad; Colonel W. J. Houston, General Ticket Agent Piedmont Air-Line; and Colonel T. M. R. Talcott, General Manager Richmond and Danville railroad, for courtesies which fa
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 12: (search)
but really am not to blame. I moved as quick as possible to close up the Union causeway, but intervening obstacles were such that before I could get my troops on the road Hardee had slipped out. Still, I know that the men that were in Savannah will be lost, in a measure, to Jeff. Davis, for the Georgia troops under G. W. Smith declared they would not fight in South Carolina, and they have gone north en route for Augusta; and I have reason to believe the North Carolina troops have gone to Wilmington; in other words, they are scattered. But these reflections will scarcely break the force of Mr. Stanton's words, heretofore quoted, from a dispatch to General Grant: It is a sore disappointment that Hardee was able to get off his fifteen thousand from Sherman's sixty thousand. It looks like protracting the war while their armies continue to escape. It might be supposed that in treating of the Savannah campaign after the lapse of so many years, General Sherman would not intro
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 16: (search)
streams, and the country was well adapted to the march of an army. But from the moment of leaving Savannah grave difficulties were to be expected at every step. The country was low and exceedingly swampy, the rains had swollen the streams and flooded the low lands, and the direction of the march was across them all. In front was Hardee with a force which might be formidable in contending the passage of the larger rivers. On the right were the garrisons of Charleston, Georgetown, and Wilmington. There was reason to expect that a portion of Hood's army would arrive on the left and strike from the direction of Augusta. Lastly, Wade Hampton, then popular in South Carolina, had been sent down from Lee's army to rally an opposing force. And, as the result proved, before serious battle was delivered, an army estimated at thirty-seven thousand veteran Confederate troops concentrated at Bentonville, under Sherman's old antagonist Johnston. The Union force at the time was fifty-seven
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