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the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians, George Benson (search)
man mind, especially at that early stage of its development to which the Scripture history chiefly refers, can most readily comprehend of the wisdom and steadiness of the course of Divine Providence. About the close of the year 1721, Mr. Benson came to London, and having been examined and approved by several of the most eminent Presbyterian ministers, he began to preach, first at Chertsey, and afterwards in London. By the recommendation of Dr. Calamy, he afterwards went to Abingdon, in Berkshire, and settled as minister of a dissenting congregation there, with whom he continued for seven years, diligently employed in studying the sacred writings, and labouring to instruct and improve the people under his care. During his stay at Abingdon, he preached and published three serious practical discourses, addressed to young people, which were well received. But of these he afterwards forbade the reprinting, as containing views of some disputed doctrines which did not accord with his m
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians, John Shute, (search)
. of Tofts, in Essex, who had married a relation of Mr. Shute, left him his estate, on condition of his assuming the name and arms of Barrington. In 1710, he received another accession to his fortune, at the death of Mr. Wildman, of Becket, in Berkshire, who also left him his estate; declaring in his will, that he did so merely because he knew no man who was so worthy of it. In 1711, the Whig administration being dismissed, Mr. Barrington lost his place as Commissioner of the Customs. In tosen, if his principles would have permitted him to give a bribe of forty pounds; but he had too strict a regard for the interest of his country to countenance corruption, and trifle with the sacredness of oaths. He died at Becket, his seat in Berkshire, after an illness of only seven hours, on the 14th of December, 1734, in the fifty-sixth year of his age. As a theological writer, Lord Barrington is certainly entitled to stand high. His learning was correct and extensive, and his diligenc
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians, Samuel Chandler (search)
Samuel Chandler one of the most learned and eminent of the liberal divines of the last century, was descended from ancestors distinguished for their attachment to religious liberty, and who, in less fortunate times, had suffered in defence of their principles; bearing cheerfully the spoiling of their goods, that they might better preserve their peace of mind, and maintain inviolate their title to a more enduring substance. He was born in 1693, at Hungerford in Berkshire, where his father, the Rev. Henry Chandler, was then minister to a congregation of Protestant dissenters. Mr. H. Chandler afterwards removed to Bath, where he spent the greater part of his ministerial life. He is said to have been a man very respectable for talents and character, though he was not led by circumstances to present himself prominently to the public notice. The subject of this memoir discovering at an early age a decided taste for literary pursuits, it was carefully cultivated with a view to th
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 3. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Anti-Slavery Poems (search)
ankest weeds of shame; Be, if ye will, the scandal of God's fair universe; We wash our hands forever of your sin and shame and curse. A voice from lips whereon the coal from Freedom's shrine hath been, Thrilled, as but yesterday, the hearts of Berkshire's mountain men: The echoes of that solemn voice are sadly lingering still In all our sunny valleys, on every wind-swept hill. And when the prowling man-thief came hunting for his prey Beneath the very shadow of Bunker's shaft of gray, How, thrnseen foe; It is coming, it is nigh! Stand your homes and altars by; On your own free thresholds die. Clang the bells in all your spires; On the gray hills of your sires Fling to heaven your signal-fires. From Wachuset, lone and bleak, Unto Berkshire's tallest peak, Let the flame-tongued heralds speak. Oh, for God and duty stand, Heart to heart and hand to hand, Round the old graves of the land. Whoso shrinks or falters now, Whoso to the yoke would bow, Brand the craven on his brow! Free
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 5. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Tales and Sketches (search)
aces; the loud voices of the speakers, burdened with the awful symbolic language of the Bible; the smoke from the fires, rising like incense,—carried me back to those days of primitive worship which tradition faintly whispers of, when on hill-tops and in the shade of old woods Religion had her first altars, with every man for her priest and the whole universe for her temple. Wisely and truthfully has Dr. Channing spoken of this doctrine of the Second Advent in his memorable discourse in Berkshire a little before his death:— There are some among us at the present moment who are waiting for the speedy coming of Christ. They expect, before another year closes, to see Him in the clouds, to hear His voice, to stand before His judgment-seat. These illusions spring from misinterpretation of Scripture language. Christ, in the New Testament, is said to come whenever His religion breaks out in new glory or gains new triumphs. He came in the Holy Spirit in the day of Pentecost. He cam
d produced the villages beyond the Piscataqua; yet in Maine, as in New Hampshire, there was a great trade in deal boards. Most of the towns were insulated settlements near the ocean, on rivers, which were employed to drive the sawmills, then described as a late invention; and cultivation had not extended far into the interior. Haverhill, on the Merrimack, was a frontier town; from Connecticut, emigrants had ascended as far as the rich meadows of Deerfield and Northfield; but to the west, Berkshire was a wilderness; Westfield was the remotest plantation. Between the towns on Connecticut River and the cluster of towns near Massachusetts Bay, Lancaster and Brookfield were the solitary abodes of Christians in the desert. The government of Massachusetts extended to the Kennebeck, and included more than half the population of New England; the confederacy of the colonies had also Hazard II. 511 been renewed, in anticipation of dangers. The number of the Indians of that day hardly amo
tocracy disputed for superiority in excesses. There industry created wealth and divided it between all the children; and none professed that the human race lives for the few. There every man was, or expected to become, a freeholder; the owner of the land held the plough; he who held the plough held the sword also; and liberty, acquired by the sacrifices and sufferings of a revered ancestry, was guarded, under the blessing of God, as a sacred trust for posterity. There, among the hills of Berkshire, or on the shores of the Narragansett, Hopkins, discoursing from the pulpit to the tillers of the soil, or to merchants and mariners, founded morals on the doctrine of disinterested love; establishing it as the duty of every one to be willing to devote himself for the glory of God, the freedom of his country, the well-being of his race. It is a people, said Samuel Adams of his countrymen, who of all the people on the earth deserve most to be free; and for a full year he had been maturin
Desecrating the Pulpit. --The Boston (Mass.) Transcript, alluding to Berkshire county, in that State, says:--"They have a new way of advertising newspaper writers in Berkshire, which Bonner should not be slow to adopt. A clergyman in the south part of the county lately announced from his pulpit that the local paper of the succeeding week would contain a poem, and such of his congregation as missed reading it would lese a valuable literary treat. The production was by the minister's wife, (Mass.) Transcript, alluding to Berkshire county, in that State, says:--"They have a new way of advertising newspaper writers in Berkshire, which Bonner should not be slow to adopt. A clergyman in the south part of the county lately announced from his pulpit that the local paper of the succeeding week would contain a poem, and such of his congregation as missed reading it would lese a valuable literary treat. The production was by the minister's wife, and of course was generally perused."
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