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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 5: (search)
ut it, but it remains still doubtful whether his treasure and labors have not been thrown away. Taking up Dr. Baird's French History of American Temperance Societies, he made many inquiries about them; said there was very little intemperance in Tuscany; spoke of spirituous liquor as an unnatural, artificial, noxious beverage, but treated wine, like a true Italian, as a gift of God, and one of the comforts and consolations of life, as healthy, and as nourishing. Coming accidentally upon the suelves, and then went to her chamber and made our adieus to the kind old lady in her bed, which was covered with the letters the post had just brought her. . . . . Few persons visited the old Etruscan and medieval towns in the western part of Tuscany forty years ago; but Mr. Ticknor stopped to enjoy the remarkable and interesting antiquities of San Gimignano and Volterra, and did not reach Pisa until the 23d of May. Pisa, May 24.—Carmignani, the principal jurist in this part of Italy,—to
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 14: (search)
nd it as cold as Fredericton, or colder. However, we will talk of these things in Boston next month. Meantime, give our hearty congratulations to Lady Head. She will certainly find it more agreeable in Canada, summer and winter, than in New Brunswick. Yours faithfully, Geo. Ticknor. My girls are out under the trees, reading the Paradiso, the eldest using the copy you gave her, and helping her sister, who uses the Florence edition, as she is not yet so familiar with the grand old Tuscan as to read him without notes that are very ample. To John Kenyon, London. Boston, January 8, 1855. dear Kenyon,—I do not choose to have another year get fairly on its course, without carrying to you assurances of our continued good wishes and affection. The last we heard from you was through Mrs. Ticknor's correspondent, ever-faithful Lady Lyell, who said she had seen you in the Zoological Gardens, well, comfortable, and full of that happiness that goodness bosoms ever. But this sec
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 15: (search)
h many persons at home, merely on the business of the Library. Consequently, he did not, as before, keep a journal of his daily experiences, and his more private correspondence also suffered in consequence of his constant occupation. In Florence he established an agency in the autumn, and attended again to its affairs in the spring. He determined, after some preliminary correspondence with an old acquaintance in Florence, Mr. Sloane, to go to the Baron von Reumont, Prussian Minister in Tuscany, whom Humboldt at Berlin had described to me as a historical writer, whose works he valued very highly, and whom he advised me strongly to visit as a person who would receive me kindly, and give me the best of literary help about Italian affairs and books, as he has lived in Italy above twenty years. Mr. Ticknor had known Baron von Reumont in Rome twenty years before, when he was attache to the legation of Baron Bunsen, and he says of him, in all sorts of ways he has turned out an invaluab
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 17: (search)
esires none. In the troubles of 1848-49, when, not quite blind, he was for some months at the head of affairs, he did good service to the state by counsels of moderation; and now, when everything is changed, he preserves not only the respect of Tuscany, but of enlightened Italians everywhere; and even the personal kindness of the Grand Duke, who spoke to me of him with great respect, while on his part he did full justice to the Grand Duke, and his motives. But his main attributes are those of a wise, learned philosopher. He ought to have lived in the days of the Stoa, or in the best days of the Roman Republic, and would have left his mark on either. The Baron von Reumont, Prussian Minister in Tuscany, who has been in Italy twenty years,—and whom Humboldt told me he considered eminently qualified to write a history of any part of the Peninsula,—said to me, Once a week I spend an afternoon with the Marquis Capponi to take a lesson in Italian history. Nobody knows it as he does.
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
omas, I. 180, 277. Truchsess, II. 41. Tudor, William, Life of James Otis, I. 338 and note. Turin, visits, II. 37-42, 351-353. Turner, Robert, II. 374 Tuscany, Grand Duchess Dowager of, II. 54, 55, 90. Tuscany, Grand Duchess of, II. 54, 89, 90. Tuscany, Leopold Grand Duke of, I. 489, II. 49, 50, 51, 53, 54, 315, 3Tuscany, Grand Duchess of, II. 54, 89, 90. Tuscany, Leopold Grand Duke of, I. 489, II. 49, 50, 51, 53, 54, 315, 339, 340. Twisleton, Hon., Edward, II. 321 and note, 323, 329, 356, 357 364, 365, 366, 370. 373, 376, 378, 379, 387, 397, 429; letters to, 418, 482, 483. Twisleton, Hon Mrs. Edward, II. 321 and note. 329, 356, 357. 358, 359, 363, 364, 365, 366, 368, 370, 376, 378, 379, 397, 400, 419, 420, 429, 431 Tyrol, II. 34, 99 TytlerTuscany, Leopold Grand Duke of, I. 489, II. 49, 50, 51, 53, 54, 315, 339, 340. Twisleton, Hon., Edward, II. 321 and note, 323, 329, 356, 357 364, 365, 366, 370. 373, 376, 378, 379, 387, 397, 429; letters to, 418, 482, 483. Twisleton, Hon Mrs. Edward, II. 321 and note. 329, 356, 357. 358, 359, 363, 364, 365, 366, 368, 370, 376, 378, 379, 397, 400, 419, 420, 429, 431 Tyrol, II. 34, 99 Tytler, Patrick Fraser, II. 150. U Ubalpo, Marchese, I. 175. Ugoni, Camillo, II 103, 107. Ullmann, Professor, II. 100. Uncle Tom's Cabin, II 286. V Van Buren, Martin, I. 372, 409. Van De Weyer, Sylvain, II. 149, 310, 311, 323, 325, 372. Vane, Lord, Harry, II. 382. Van Rensselaer, General, I. 381. Varnhagen
James Russell Lowell, Among my books, Dante. (search)
e is a curious passage in the Convito which shows how bitterly he resented his undeserved poverty. He tells us that buried treasure commonly revealed itself to the bad rather than the good. Verily I saw the place on the flanks of a mountain in Tuscany called Falterona, where the basest peasant of the whole countryside digging found there more than a bushel of pieces of the finest silver, which perhaps had awaited him more than a thousand years. (Tr. IV. c. 11.) One can see the grimness of hwhat was foreign and artificial, he let the poem make itself out of him. The epic which he wished to write in the universal language of scholars, and which might have had its ten lines in the history of literature, would sing itself in provincial Tuscan, and turns out to be written in the universal dialect of mankind. Thus all great poets have been in a certain sense provincial,—Homer, Dante, Shakespeare, Goethe, Burns, Scott in the Heart of Midlothian and Bride of Lammermoor,—because the offic
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing), chapter 11 (search)
he Italian autumn is not as beautiful as I expected, neither in the vintage of Tuscany nor here. The country is really sere and brown; but the weather is fine, and ng that it was the right of the people, was very repulsive to me. Passing into Tuscany, I found the liberty of the press just established. The Grand Duke, a well-inthe Pope here is without bounds; he can always calm the crowd at once. But in Tuscany, where they have no such one idol, they listened in the same way on a very try man yet. Our journey here was delightful;—it is the first time I have seen Tuscany when the purple grape hangs gar— landed from tree to tree. We were in the ear police during her residence in Florence. as well as by the state of things in Tuscany at that time, to a comparative inaction, Madame Ossoli never seemed to lose ind, however, I think, by the apparent apathy and prostration of the Liberals in Tuscany; and the presence of the Austrian troops in Florence was as painful and annoyi
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing), chapter 12 (search)
o, chiedi Umilmente che'l serrame scioglia. Dante Che luce è questa, e qual nuova beltate? Dicean tra lor; perch‘ abito si adorno Dal mondo errante a quest ‘alto soggiorno Non sali mai in tutta questa etate. Ella contenta aver cangiato albergo, Si paragona pur coi piu perfetti Petrarca. Spring-time. Spring, bright prophet of God's eternal youth, herald forever eloquent of heaven's undying joy, has once more wrought its miracle of resurrection on the vineyards and olive-groves of Tuscany, and touched with gently-wakening fingers the myrtle and the orange in the gardens of Florence. The Apennines have put aside their snowy winding-sheet, and their untroubled faces salute with rosy gleams of promise the new day, while flowers smile upward to the serene sky amid the grass and grain fields, and fruit is swelling beneath the blossoms along the plains of Arno. The Italian spring, writes Margaret, is as good as Paradise. Days come of glorious sunshine and gently-flowing airs, t
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States. (search)
sed negotiations with Spain so actively that Berthier signed the treaty for the retrocession of Louisiana the following day, October 1, 1800. In compensation to Spain for this cession France engaged to create the kingdom of Etruria, composed of Tuscany and adjacent territory, and to seat on its throne the son of the duke of Parma, who was son-in-law of the king of Spain. Napoleon was now master of the situation. Whatever plans he may have formed, it was in his power to execute. How far he03, p. 1017.) Mr. Rufus King, the minister at London, in a subsequent letter, dated November 20, 1801, put all doubts at rest by forwarding to the secretary of state, James Madison, a copy of the treaty for establishing the prince of Parma in Tuscany, which made allusion to the secret treaty ceding Louisiana to France. Previous to this letter, Mr. Madison, under date of July 29, 1801, wrote to Mr. Pinckney, minister at Madrid, instructing him to obtain information and to use what influenc
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
Bluff, May 16, 1864; promoted for gallantry May 20, 1864. After the return of peace he resumed his occupation of farming, in which he was very successful. He was married in 1854 to Miss Mary Watt, and they had six children. He died January 3, 1899. Colonel Allen Cadwallader Izard, postmaster at Walterboro, S. C., was born in Chester in 1834. His grandfather, Henry Izard, was a native of South Carolina and a son of Ralph Izard, an Englishman, who was commissioner from this country to Tuscany, and one of the two first United States senators elected from South Carolina. When a child Mr. Izard was taken by his widowed mother to Columbia, and was there reared and educated. He entered the naval academy at Annapolis in 1850, and after two years study on shore spent two years on the sloop-of-war Portsmouth, and was detached at the Sandwich islands early in 1853 and assigned to the St. Lawrence, a 60-gun frigate, the flagship of the Pacific squadron, in which he cruised until 1855, w
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