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The Daily Dispatch: March 22, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 10, 1860., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 9, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 2 0 Browse Search
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 4, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ledyard, John 1751- (search)
aving a resistless desire for travel, he shipped at New London as a common sailor, and from England accompanied Captain Cook in his last voyage around the world as corporal of marines. He vainly tried to set on foot a trading expedition to the northwest coast of North America, and went to Europe in 1784. He started on a journey through the northern part of Europe and Asia and across Bering Strait to America in 1786-87. He walked around the whole coast of the Gulf of Bothnia, reaching St. Petersburg in the latter part of March, 1787, without money, shoes, or stockings. He had journeyed 1,400 miles on foot in less than seven weeks. Thence he went to Siberia, but was arrested at Irkutsk in February, 1788, conducted to the frontiers of Poland, and there dismissed with an intimation that if he returned into Russia he would be hanged. The cause of his arrest was the jealousy of the Russian-American Trading Company. Going back to London, Ledyard accepted an offer to engage in the explo
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pinkney, William 1764- (search)
in 1805, and the next year he was sent to England as commissioner to treat with the British government in conjunction with James Monroe. He was minister there from 1807 to 1811, and in the autumn of the latter year was chosen to his State Senate from Baltimore. From December, 1811, until 1814, he was United States Attorney-General. In the latter year he entered the military service to repel a British invasion of his State, and was severely wounded in the battle of Bladensburg. Again in Congress (1815-16), he took a leading part. In 1816 he went to Naples as special minister there, and became minister at St. Petersburg, whence he returned home in 1818. From 1820 until his death he held a seat in the United States Senate. In that body he opposed with all his powers of oratory the admission of Missouri into the Union under the terms of the compromise. His death was occasioned by overexertion in a case in the Supreme Court of the United States, in Washington, D. C., Feb. 25, 1822.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Revolution, diplomacy of the (search)
has acted against her true interests in encouraging and supporting this independence, and so I have often declared to the ministers of this nation. When the armed neutrality was proposed in 1780, the Americans gladly joined the European powers with their moral influence (all they could then give), for it would aid themselves by weakening England. Its results were disappointing to the other powers, but it added to the open enemies of England. The Congress, in instructions to Dana at St. Petersburg, had said: You will readily perceive that it must be a leading and capital point, if these United States shall be formally admitted as a party to the convention of the neutral maritime powers for maintaining the freedom of commerce. Thus early, while yet fighting for independence, the American statesmen assumed the dignity and used the language of the representatives of a powerful nation, which they certainly expected to form. The Americans had opened negotiations with the States-Gen
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ropes, John Codman 1836- (search)
Ropes, John Codman 1836- Historian; born in St. Petersburg, Russia, April 28, 1836; graduated at Harvard in 1857; admitted to the bar in 1861. He is the author of The army under Pope; The story of the Civil War; The campaign of Waterloo, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Schuyler, Eugene 1840-1890 (search)
Schuyler, Eugene 1840-1890 Diplomatist; born in Ithaca, N. Y., Feb. 26, 1840; graduated at Yale College in 1859, and at the Columbia Law School in 1863; engaged in practice in 1863-66; was United States consul at Moscow in 1866-69; at Reval in 1869-70; secretary of the United States legation at St. Petersburg in 1870-76; at Constantinople in 1876-78; charge d'affaires at Bucharest in 1880-82; minister to Greece, Servia, and Rumania in 1882-84; and consul-general at Cairo from 1889 till his death. He contributed to magazines and wrote American diplomacy. He died in Cairo, Egypt, July 18, 1890.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
President Grant......Jan. 24, 1870 Virginia readmitted by act approved Jan. 26, and government transferred to civil authorities by General Canby......Jan. 27, 1870 George Peabody buried at Peabody (South Danvers), Mass......Feb. 8, 1870 Congress authorizes the Secretary of War to establish a weather bureau for the United States......Feb. 9, 1870 Northern Pacific Railroad begun at the Dalles of the St. Louis, Minn......Feb. 15, 1870 Anson Burlingame, born 1822, dies at St. Petersburg, Russia......Feb. 23, 1870 Mississippi readmitted by act approved......Feb. 23, 1870 Hiram R. Revels, of Mississippi, first colored member of the Senate, sworn......Feb. 25, 1870 Act removing legal and political disabilities from many persons in the Southern States......March 7, 1870 Texas readmitted by act approved......March 30, 1870 Secretary Fish proclaims the ratification of Fifteenth Amendment by twenty-nine States: North Carolina, West Virginia, Massachusetts, Wiscons
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, (search)
o county agricultural societies to promote agriculture and family domestic manufactures......1817 State library founded at Albany......April 21, 1818 First steamboat, Walk-in-the-water, on Lake Erie......1818 Hamilton Theological Seminary, Madison county, incorporated......1819 Steamship Savannah, 380 tons, Capt. Moses Rodgers, sails from New York, where she was built, for Savannah, Ga.......April 10, 1819 [Arriving there April 17, she sails from that port, May 24, for St. Petersburg, Russia, via Liverpool, reaches Liverpool, June 20; sails for St. Petersburg, July 23; returns to Savannah, fifty days from St. Petersburg, December, 1819; first American steamship to cross the Atlantic.] Population of the State, 1,372,111......1820 [From this time the State has been styled the Empire State. ] Revised State constitution adopted and ratified......February, 1822 Joseph C. Yates, governor......1822 Champlain Canal begun 1816, finished......1823 De Witt Clinton
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Washington, (search)
the Okanagan, a branch of the Columbia......August, 1811 Pierre Dorion and two others massacred by Indians on the Snake River......January, 1814 Fort Walla Walla, on the Columbia River, built by the Hudson Bay Company......1818 Exploring party under James McMillan leaves Astoria, Nov. 18, 1824; ascends the Chehalis River to Black River, thence to Tumwater Lake; thence by an Indian portage it descends the Eld Inlet to Puget Sound......December, 1824 Convention with Russia at St. Petersburg, April 5-7, 1824, regulating fishing and trading on the Pacific coast, and fixing 54° 40′ as the northern boundary of the United States, ratified......Jan. 12, 1825 Dr. John McLoughlin, of the Hudson Bay Company, moves headquarters from Astoria to Vancouver, which thus becomes first settlement in present State of Washington......1825 Fort Colville built by the Hudson Bay Company at Kettle Falls, on the Columbia......1825 Nathaniel J. Wyeth, with twenty-one men, starts from Bosto
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Whistler, George Washington 1800- (search)
Whistler, George Washington 1800- Civil engineer; born in Fort Wayne, Ind., May 19, 1800; graduated at West Point in 1819, and resigned in 1833. He engaged in the construction of railroads, and in 1842 became chief engineer of the St. Petersburg and Moscow (Russia) Railroad, which he was engaged in constructing and equipping as sole superintendent. He was also employed in constructing extensive dock-yards at St. Petersburg, where he died, April 7, 1849.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), His son, Thomas Dekay 1820-1878 (search)
8 Engineer, born in Vernon, N. J., Dec. 6, 1820, became a partner with his father and his brother, William Lewis. In 1843, with Andrew M. Eastwick, and Joseph Harrison, he went to Russia in the place of his father, who had been invited to St. Petersburg by the Russian government, and executed a contract to construct the rollingstock of the railroad between St. Petersburg and Moscow, for $3,000,000. Later other contracts were concluded which proved very lucrative. He invented with his fatherwent to Russia in the place of his father, who had been invited to St. Petersburg by the Russian government, and executed a contract to construct the rollingstock of the railroad between St. Petersburg and Moscow, for $3,000,000. Later other contracts were concluded which proved very lucrative. He invented with his father and brother a system of steam navigation known as the cigar-ship, and a tubular arrangement by which young trout could be easily fed. He died in Newport, R. I., June 11, 1878.
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