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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 56: commerce-destroyers.-their inception, remarkable career, and ending. (search)
should be over. The Georgia, not being very successful in taking prizes, was finally taken to Liverpool, her crew discharged, and the vessel sold by Captain J. D. Bullock, agent of the Confederate Nwas no question in regard to her; but the same day she sailed, the steamer Laurel cleared from Liverpool for Nassau, with several Confederate naval officers and a cargo of cases marked Machinery, butring his vessel to the nearest United States authority as he should have done, he proceeded to Liverpool and delivered the Shenandoah to the British authorities. This was the last scene in the tere she was engaged in hostilities against the Federal Government. A year later she returned to Liverpool, was dismantled and sold to a British subject, the bill of sale being signed by Captain James failing in his attempt, he proceeded to Nassau, landed his cargo, and the vessel was taken to Liverpool and delivered to Fraser, Trenholm & Co., the Confederate agents; but as the British authoritie
Matthew Arnold, Civilization in the United States: First and Last Impressions of America., III: a word more about America. (search)
Star, like Zedekiah the son of Chenaanah, thus making horns of iron for the middle class and bidding it Go up and prosper! and my first efforts as a writer on public matters were prompted by a desire to utter, like Micaiah, the son of Imlah, my protest against these misleading assurances of the false prophets. And though often and often smitten on the cheek, just as Micaiah was, still I persevered; and at the Royal Institution I said how we seemed to flounder and to beat the air, and at Liverpool I singled out as our chief want the want of lucidity. But now everybody is really saying of us the same thing: that we fumble because we cannot make up our mind, and that we cannot make up our mind because we do not know what to be after. If our foreign policy is not that of the British Philistine, with his likes and dislikes, his effusion and confusion, his hot and cold fits, his want of dignity and of the steadfastness which comes from dignity, his want of ideas, and of the steadfastne
Matthew Arnold, Civilization in the United States: First and Last Impressions of America., IV: civilization in the United States. (search)
within a laboring man's easy reach. I have mentioned ice; I will mention fruit also. The abundance and cheapness of fruit is a great boon to people of small incomes in America. Do not believe the Americans when they extol their peaches as equal to any in the world, or better than any in the world; they are not to be compared to peaches grown under glass. Do not believe that the American Newtown pippins appear in the New York and Boston fruit-shops as they appear in those of London and Liverpool ; or that the Americans have any pear to give you like the Marie Louise. But what laborer, or artisan, or small clerk, ever gets hot-house peaches, or Newtown pippins, or Marie Louise pears? Not such good pears, apples, and peaches as those, but pears, apples, and peaches by no means to be despised, such people and their families do in America get in plenty. Well, now, what would a philosopher or a philanthropist say in this case? which would he say was the more civilized condition —
tional law does no justice to its spirit and purpose, but stands in need of prompt and thorough revision. The career of the Sumter, Capt. Raphael Semmes, came to an early and inglorious end, as has already been narrated. Vol. I., pp. 602-3. But another and superior cruiser was promptly constructed at Birkenhead to replace her; which our Embassador, Hon. Charles F. Adams, tried earnestly, but in vain, to have seized and detained at the outset by the British Government. Escaping from Liverpool under the name of Oreto, she was twice seized at Nassau, but to no purpose: that island being the focus of blockade-running, and, of course, violently sympathetic with the Rebellion — as was, in fact, nearly every officer in the British naval or military service. Released from duress, she put to sea, and soon appeared as a British ship of war off the harbor of Mobile, then blockaded by Com'r Geo. II. Preble, who hesitated to fire on her lest she should be what she seemed; and in a few mi
diate arrest if they open their mouths again. The searcher then says, All who have baggage will please step into the forward car. He then asks each man to open his trunk, and passes his hand as carefully as may be through the bundles of varieties with which human beings fill their apparatus. One's luggage does not undergo half the danger which it is subjected to in a Liverpool custom-house. I have seen both classes of operators, and I would much prefer to go by the Relay than land in Liverpool. Suddenly the searcher comes across a common-looking, red, wooden trunk. It is marked Mary Birkitt, Wheeling, Virginia. There is nothing suspicious about it. It looks in keeping with some village aunt, who had forsworn the company of the coarser sex, and had just returned from a visit to some relations who had lately thrown themselves away by swearing, in the presence of a parson, to keep house, neatly and economically, for some one of those worthless creatures called men. The searche
He enlisted in the Davis as boatswain, and while on board, the brigantine Santa Clara and bark Alvarado were captured. He was also in the Davis when she was lost on St. Augustine bar. The names and nativity of the crew are as follows: Oliver Ruse, carpenter, aged twenty-one, born in Charleston; Wm. Dangler, cook, aged twenty-six, born in Redbank, N. J.; Peter Parry, seaman, aged eighteen, born in South Carolina--was on the Jeff. Davis; James McGivern, seaman, aged twenty-two, born in Liverpool; John Burns, seaman, aged forty-five, born in Dublin; John Conway, seaman, aged thirty, born in Philadelphia; joined a French company of Zouaves in New Orleans; went to Warrington, deserted, arrived in Charleston destitute, and enlisted on the Beauregard from necessity; Daniel Culle, seaman, aged sixteen, born in Glasgow; Henry F. Randolph, seaman, aged twenty-five, born in New York — he is deaf; was seduced on board, and not allowed to leave the vessel; Wm. Boyd, seaman, aged twenty-six y
eamtug at my own expense, and landed my crew in Southampton docks between nine and ten A. M., and they were taken charge of by the United States consul there. Repeatedly while on board the steamer, in conversations with her officers, I was told that she was not fitted out as a vessel of war, that she was on a special mission to England, but naval officers were in command of her. I was told by one of the crew, that the crew originally signed articles at Charleston, South Carolina, to go to Liverpool, but that before sailing the officers were all changed, and new articles were brought on board, which the crew were compelled to sign by threats of force. I was also informed that the crew was composed of English and Irish. The chronometer and barometer belonging to the Harvey Birch, were taken by Captain Pegram, who refuses to deliver them up. The Harvey Birch was a ship six years old, and of 1,482 tons register. Before we lost sight of the ship her masts had gone over the side, and
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 16: capture of fortifications around Richmond, Newmarket Heights, Dutch Gap Canal, elections in New York and gold conspiracy. (search)
ville, Tennessee. Did you continue business there? For a little while. When and where did you go then? To New Orleans. At what time? When Governor Isham left the State and the Union troops occupied Nashville. When did you leave New Orleans? When you took possession of the city. Were you in the same business there? Yes, sir. Were you connected with any banking firm or financial association? Yes, sir; the citizens' bank. Where did you go then? To Liverpool, England. Ho, ho, Mr. Lyons, then I guess we are business acquaintances. Are you the H. J. Lyons who made claim on the Citizens' Bank of New Orleans from Liverpool for a large amount of money? Yes, General. And you claimed to have left this money there as a neutral British subject, didn't you? Smilingly he replied: Yes, General. And as I remember, you did not get it? No; it was stopped by your order. Did you do business for any time in Liverpool? No, sir. Where did
Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Introduction. (search)
The colonial system of Great Britain before the Revolution forbade the establishment of any other than household manufactures. Soon after the Revolution, cotton mills were erected in Rhode Island and Massachusetts, and the infant manufacture was encouraged by State duties on the imported fabric. The raw material was still derived exclusively from the West Indies. Its culture in this country was so extremely limited and so little known, that a small parcel sent from the United States to Liverpool in 1784 was seized at the custom-house there, as an illicit importation of British colonial produce. Even as late as 1794, and by persons so intelligent as the negotiators of Jay's treaty, it was not known that cotton was an article of growth and export from the United States. In the twelfth article of that treaty, as laid before the Senate, Cotton was included with Molasses, Sugar, Coffee, and Cocoa, as articles which American vessels should not be permitted to carry from the islands or
The hoisting of the rebel flag in Liverpool.--A good deal of excitement was created in Liverpool on the 24th inst., by the appearance of a secession flag at the mast-head of an American barque lying at the Victoria wharf. The vessel which has acquired such an unenviable notoriety is the Annapolis, Captain Pickett, from BaltimoreLiverpool on the 24th inst., by the appearance of a secession flag at the mast-head of an American barque lying at the Victoria wharf. The vessel which has acquired such an unenviable notoriety is the Annapolis, Captain Pickett, from Baltimore. We understand by private advices from our agent, that the American shippers at Liverpool were so incensed at the gratuitous insult offered to their country by the piratical skipper, that nothing but the utmost respect for law and order prevented them from hauling down his colors without leave or license.--London American, May 20We understand by private advices from our agent, that the American shippers at Liverpool were so incensed at the gratuitous insult offered to their country by the piratical skipper, that nothing but the utmost respect for law and order prevented them from hauling down his colors without leave or license.--London American, May 20.
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