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call for it. At this place, too, I beheld a wonder. With my own eyes I saw the buds of three large roses growing on the limb of an apple-tree! That beats the knockers all to pieces. The traveler who thus wrote was Rev. B. F. Tefft, D. D., the editor whose Tracks covered a journey from Cincinnati, O., to Bangor, Me., and return. In this section quoted from, he described Boston and suburbs as seen from the State House cupola, and in another place we find that Captain Rich was of Brookline. He visited Bath, Me., and mentions its ship-building, but as inferior to that of Medford in amount. His publication at New York and Cincinnati, 1840-1877, was that devoted to literature and religion issued by the Book Concern of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and held the esteem of the people as the queen of the monthlies. It would seem that such a one as he would not be imposed on by any fake, and now, after sixty-eight years, we wonder (to use his word) if Medford had then a Luth
's individuality, as disclosed by criticism and opinions regarding events and personal experiences. Such a charm, we think, attaches to a letter bearing date of Brookline, July 20, 1817, and written by Miss Fanny Searle The first-named died in Brookline, May 3, 1851, and the latter in Newburyport, June 28, 1877. to her sister, Brookline, May 3, 1851, and the latter in Newburyport, June 28, 1877. to her sister, Mrs. Margaret Curzon, The first-named died in Brookline, May 3, 1851, and the latter in Newburyport, June 28, 1877. then at Havana, Cuba. In it is a description of an all-day excursion on the Middlesex canal on July 18, 1817. The readers of the Historical Register may be interested in it because of details which occurred in MeBrookline, May 3, 1851, and the latter in Newburyport, June 28, 1877. then at Havana, Cuba. In it is a description of an all-day excursion on the Middlesex canal on July 18, 1817. The readers of the Historical Register may be interested in it because of details which occurred in Medford. The picnic party consisted of a large gathering of what was best in the society of the old town of Boston. It was held at the Lake of the Woods, now known as Horn pond, in Woburn. The Indian name was Innitou. There were represented the Winthrops, Quincys, Amorys, Sullivans, Grays, Masons, Tudors, Eliots, Cabots, and ot
rcury of that time with account of the patriotic decorations and displays; also certain rhymes of more or less interest relating to the historic day. But in 1917 there came an organized effort to make the occasion worth while and notable in Boston and the other cities and towns along the historic route. The first was certainly creditable to Medford, as indeed the later ones have been. In more recent years a second rider personating William Dawes has gone over that other route through Brookline and Cambridge which is 8 miles to Boston (see milestone at Harvard Square). The Old North or Christ Church still stands, and at the close of a service on the night of April 1 8, a messenger ascends to the steeple and hangs out two lights. Captain Isaac Hall's house in Medford also still stands, and Mr. Edward Gaffey, its owner and occupant, is glad to open its doors to welcome the personator of Revere. This year he was welcomed in the street by a lineal descendant of the minute-men'
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 28., What Mean Ye by these stones? (search)
en removed was created and given the name of Sagamore park. This, with the monument, has been conveyed to the city of Medford and is now in charge of its park commission, which caused the re-erection of the monument on January 9, 1925. Accounts of the remains there deposited had varied somewhat, and at request of Supt. Edward Adams the writer was present on November 13, 1924, when the box was removed from the cavity and opened. There were also present by request Mr. Calvin W. Lewis of Brookline (the historian referred to) and Mr. Frank Lincoln, an old resident. James M. Blake, Thomas Blakie, thirteen interested boys and a few ladies residing nearby also appeared upon the scene. The wooden box was much decayed. From it Superintendent Adams removed the remains of those whose bones lie here—we quote the words of Mr. Brooks' inscription as expression of the fact. When originally discovered they were found buried in a sitting posture, but in the box they were simply packed in, i
probably in England, about 1632, who removed from Concord to Medford and died 29 July 1696, aged 64. His two wives, Susanna and Hannah, were sisters, being the daughters of Thomas Atkinson; and by the second wife, Hannah, he had two sons, Ebenezer of Medford, whose grandson, John Brooks (1752-1825), was the wellknown Governor of Massachusetts, and Samuel of Medford, who was born 1 September 1672 and died 3 July 1733. This Samuel married Sarah Boylston, daughter of Dr. Thomas Boylston of Brookline and sister of the wife of his brother Ebenezer; and their son Samuel of Medford, who was born 3 September 1700 and died 5 July 1768, was by his wife, Mary Boutwell of Reading, the father of five children, one of whom was Rev. Edward Brooks of Medford, A. B. (Harvard, 1755), A. M. (ib., 1760), who was born 4 November 1743 and died at Medford 6 May 1781. For a few years after his graduation at Harvard Edward Brooks was librarian of Harvard College, and in July 1764 he was settled as pastor
nd Thos. D. Foster, who voluntarily surrendered the revenue cutter Robert McClelland to the State of Louisiana, have been dismissed from the revenue service. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant. John A. Dix, Secretary of the Treasury. Meeting of Working men in Boston. The working men of Boston held a crowded meeting, at Fauteuil Hall, on Wednesday night. From the Advertiser's report of the proceedings we make the following extracts: Mr. Charles W. Wilder, of Brookline, read a long address from the working men of Massachusetts to their fellow-citizens throughout the Union. The address sets forth, at great length, the causes which have brought the present distracted state of affairs upon the country. Among the causes given is, that the men who have been placed in power have misrepresented the people. By them the " be loved Union"has been broken. Among the chief causes of the trouble is, that the people of the North and the South have been betrayed by
William Appleton. --This gentleman, who died in Brookline, Mass., on Saturday, was the last of three of the Appleton family who long flourished as noble specimens of "the solid men of Boston. " All rose from poverty to great wealth by their own honest exertions, all were generous with their means, and all, amidst the pursuits of business, reached an honorable degree of self-culture. The Boston Traveller says: The life of Mr. Appleton has been intimately connected for the past half century with the business history of the city, State, and nation. At an early period of our manufacturing industry, his efforts greatly added to its enlargement A merchant, his ships visited the most distant seas. A citizen, he exercised a powerful influence upon political and financial affairs, and during the life of Mr. Webster was one of his firmest supporters.--To the last moment of his life he remained true to the principles of the Whig party, which for so many years controlled the destini
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