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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Expositions, industrial. (search)
ty. The United States stands alone in maintaining four permanent expositions: one in the former Art Palace of the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, now known as the Field Columbian Museum; another in the former Memorial Hall of the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia; and two, known as Commercial Museums, in Philadelphia. The following is a list of the principal industrial expositions of the world, to nearly all of which the United States has been a large contributor: London, 1851; Cork, 1852; New York, New Brunswick, Madras, and Dublin, each 1853; Munich, 1854; Paris, 1855; Edinburgh and Manchester, each 1857; London, 1862; Paris, 1867; Vienna, 1873; Philadelphia, 1876; Paris, 1878; Atlanta, 1881; Louisville, 1883; New Orleans, 1884-85; Paris, 1889; Chicago, 1893; Atlanta, 1895; Nashville, 1897; Omaha, 1898; Omaha and Philadelphia, each 1899; Paris, 1900; Buffalo and Glasgow, each 1901. For details of the most noteworthy of these expositions, see their respective titles.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fargo, William George 1818-1881 (search)
Fargo, William George 1818-1881 Expressman; born in Pompey, N. Y., May 20, 1818; became the Buffalo agent of the Pomeroy Express Company in 1843; established the first express company west of Buffalo in partnership with Henry Wells and Daniel Dunning in 1844. The line was extended until it reached San Francisco, Cal. In 1868 Mr. Fargo became president of the corporation, which by the time of his death had 2,700 offices, over 5,000 employees, and a capital of $18,000,000. The city of Fargame the Buffalo agent of the Pomeroy Express Company in 1843; established the first express company west of Buffalo in partnership with Henry Wells and Daniel Dunning in 1844. The line was extended until it reached San Francisco, Cal. In 1868 Mr. Fargo became president of the corporation, which by the time of his death had 2,700 offices, over 5,000 employees, and a capital of $18,000,000. The city of Fargo, N. D., was named after him. He died in Buffalo, N. Y., Aug. 3, 1881. See pony express.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fenian Brotherhood, the. (search)
Early in April an attempt was made to gather arms and men for an advance upon New Brunswick, and 500 Fenians assembled at Eastport, Me. The United States authorities interfered, however; aid which was expected from New York and Boston did not arrive; and the men disbanded. On May 19, 1,200 stands of arms, which had been sent to Rouse's Point, were seized by the United States government, and on May 30 a similar seizure was made at St. Albans. June 1, about 1,500 men crossed into Canada at Buffalo. The Dominion militia had been called out, and on June 2 a severe skirmish occurred, in which the Fenians lost heavily in prisoners and wounded men, though not many were killed. Attempting to get back over the border into this country, 700 of them were captured by the United States authorities. Other bands had by this time reached the frontier, but as a cordon of United States troops, under General Meade, guarded the line, they made no attempt to cross. Though large sums of money were r
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fillmore, Millard 1800- (search)
of the unexpired term of his apprenticeship, and studied law with Walter Wood, who gave him his board for his services in his office. In 1821 he went on foot to Buffalo, where he arrived, an entire stranger, with $4 in his pocket. There he continued to study law, paying his expenses by teaching school and assisting in the post he stood in the rank of the foremost lawyers in the State. He was admitted to practice in the highest courts of the State in 1829; and the next year he moved to Buffalo, where he practised until 1847, when he was chosen comptroller of the State. Then he retired from the profession. His political life began in 1828, when he was n for the Presidency by the native American party (q. v.). He accepted it, but Maryland alone gave him its electoral vote. The remainder of his life was spent in Buffalo, where he indulged his taste for historical studies, and where he died, March 8, 1874. Texas boundary controversy. On Aug. 6, 1850, President Fillmore trans
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Free-soil party, (search)
is was the famous Wilmot Proviso. Resolutions to this effect were offered in both the Democratic and Whig conventions in 1846, but were rejected. A consequence of such rejection was a considerable secession of prominent men, and many others, from both parties, especially in Massachusetts, New York, and Ohio. In New York the seceding Democrats were called Barnburners (q. v.) and the two classes of seceders combined were called Free-soilers. The two combined, and at a convention held at Buffalo, Aug. 9, 1848, they formed the Free-soil party. The convention was composed of delegates from all the free-labor States, and from Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and the District of Columbia. They nominated Martin Van Buren (q. v.) for President of the United States, and Charles Francis Adams (q. v.) for Vice-President. The ticket received a popular anti-slavery vote of 291,000, but did not receive a single electoral vote. The Freesoil Convention at Pittsburg in 1852 nominated John P. Hal
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Garfield, James Abram 1831-1881 (search)
crossed the Oneida Lake, thence down the Oswego to Lake Ontario, coasting along the lake to Niagara. After encountering innumerable hardships, the party reached Buffalo on June 17, where they met Red Jacket and the principal chiefs of the Six Nations, and on the 23d of that month completed a contract with those chiefs, by which tds to the Western Indians, and two beef cattle and 100 gallons of whiskey to the Eastern Indians, besides gifts and provisions to all of them. Setting out from Buffalo on June 27, they coasted along the shore of the lake, some of the party in boats and others marching along the banks. In the journal of Seth Pease, published i time the white inhabitants west of the Genesee River and along the coasts of the lakes were as follows: the garrison at Niagara, two families at Lewiston, one at Buffalo, one at Cleveland, and one at Sandusky. There were no other families east of Detroit; :and, with the exception of a few adventurers at the Salt Springs of the Ma
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Grand army of the republic, the. (search)
n S. Kountz, Ohio. 19. Portland, Me., 1885; S. S. Burdett, Washington. 20. San Francisco, Cal., 1886; Lucius Fairchild, Wisconsin. 21. St. Louis, Mo., 1887; John P. Rea, Minnesota. 22. Columbus, O., 1888; William Warner, Missouri. 23. Milwaukee, Wis., 1889; Russell A. Alger, Michigan. 24. Boston, Mass., 1890; Wheelock G. Veasey, Vermont. 25. Detroit, Mich., 1891; John Palmer, New York. 26. Washington, 1892; A. G. Weissert, Wisconsin. 27. Indianapolis, Ind., 1893; John G. B. Adams, Massachusetts. 28. Pittsburg, Pa., 1894; Thomas G. Lawler, Illinois. 29. Louisville, Ky., 1895; Ivan N. Walker, Indiana. 30. St. Paul, Minn., 1896; Thaddeus S. Clarkson, Nebraska. 31. Buffalo, N. Y., 1897; John P. S. Gobin, Pennsylvania. 32. Cincinnati, O., 1898; Died Feb. 5, 1899. James A. Sexton, Illinois. 33. Cincinnati, O., 1898; W. C. Johnson, Ohio. 34. Philadelphia, Pa., 1899; Albert D. Shaw, New York. 35. Chicago, III., 1900; Leo Rassieur, Missouri.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Griffin, the (search)
Griffin, the The vessel of La Salle, on Lake Erie; built early in 1667, at the mouth of Cayuga Creek, not far below the site of Buffalo, and near the foot of Squaw Island. She was armed with a battery of seven small cannon and some muskets, and floated a flag bearing the device of an eagle. In August, the same year, she sailed for the western end of Lake Erie. This was the beginning of the commerce on the Great Lakes.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hall, Nathan Kelsey 1810-1874 (search)
Hall, Nathan Kelsey 1810-1874 Statesman; born in Marcellus, N. Y., March 10, 1810; admitted to the bar in 1832; appointed judge of the court of common pleas in 1841; elected to the Assembly in 1845; to Congress in 1847. President Fillmore appointed him Postmaster-General in 1850 and United States district judge in 1852. He died in Buffalo, N. Y., March 2, 1874.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hamilton, Frank Hastings 1813-1886 (search)
Hamilton, Frank Hastings 1813-1886 Surgeon; born in Wilmington, Vt., Sept. 10, 1813; graduated at Union College in 1830. and in medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in 1835. In 1839 he became Professor of Surgery in the Western College of Physicians and Surgeons, and in the following year in the medical college at Geneva. In 1846 he was appointed Professor of Surgery in the medical college in Buffalo, of which he later became dean. When the Long Island Hospital College was established in 1859, he became Professor of the Principles and Practice of Surgery there and also surgeon-in-chief. In 1861 he was made Professor of Military Surgery, and at the outbreak of the Civil War went to the front with the 31st New York Volunteers. During the first battle of Bull Run he was director of the general field hospital in Centreville. In 1862 he was appointed a medical director in the army, and in 1863 a medical inspector, with the rank of lieutenant-colonel. He, however, soon re
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