Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Buffalo, N. Y. (New York, United States) or search for Buffalo, N. Y. (New York, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 139 results in 71 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hunters' Lodges. (search)
en as Van Rensselaer, who took possession of Navy Island in the Niagara River, belonging to Canada, or William Johnson, who was called the Pirate of the thousand Islands, and was outlawed by the governments of the United States and Great Britain. These secret organizations were called Hunters' Lodges. Among their members were many Canadian refugees, and William Lyon Mackenzie, the chief agitator in Upper Canada, who had been driven from the province, organized an executive committee in Buffalo, N. Y., for the purpose of directing the invasion of Canada. These Hunters' Lodges organized invading parties at Detroit, Sandusky, Oswego, and Watertown, in northern New York, and in Vermont. At one time, Van Rensselaer and Johnson had under them about 2,000 men, at an island a little below Kingston, Canada, It is said that the Hunters' Lodges within the American lines numbered, at one time, nearly 1,200, with a membership of 80,000. They were kept up after the insurrection was crushed and
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jones, James Athearn 1790-1853 (search)
Jones, James Athearn 1790-1853 Author; born in Tisbury, Mass., June 4, 1790; received a common-school education, and engaged in journalism in Philadelphia in 1826; later was editor in Baltimore, Md., and in Buffalo, N. Y. His publications include Traditions of the North American Indians, or tales of an Indian camp; Gold medal awarded by Congress to Jacob Jones. Letter to an English gentleman on English libels of America; and Haverhill, or memoirs of an officer in the army of Wolfe. He died in Brooklyn, N. Y., in August, 1853.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Larned, Josephus Nelson 1836- (search)
Larned, Josephus Nelson 1836- Author; born in Chatham, Ont., Canada, May 11, 1836; received a public school education in Buffalo; was on the editorial staff of the Buffalo Express in 1859-72; superintendent of education in that city in 1872-73; superintendent of the Buffalo Library in 1877-97; and president of the American Library Association in 1893-94. He is author of History for ready reference and Talks about labor.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lay, John L. 1832-1899 (search)
Lay, John L. 1832-1899 inventor; born in Buffalo, N. Y., Jan. 14, 1832; joined the United States navy in July, 1862, as a second assistant engineer. He invented the torpedo with which Lieut. William B. Cushing (q. v.) sank the Confederate ram Albemarle. In 1867 he designed the Lay submarine torpedo-boat, which was later purchased by the United States government. He died in New York City, April 17, 1899.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McAlester, miles Daniel 1833-1869 (search)
McAlester, miles Daniel 1833-1869 Military officer; born in New York, March 21, 1833; graduated at West Point in 1856, and entered the engineer corps in May, 1861. He was one of the most useful of the engineer officers of the United States army during the Civil War, being successively chief engineer in a corps of the Army of the Potomac, of the Department of the Ohio, at the siege of Vicksburg, and of the Military Division of the West. In 1863-64 he was assistant Professor of Engineering at West Point. He was in many battles of the war, and assisted in reducing several strongholds in the vicinity of Mobile. He died in Buffalo, N. Y., April 23, 1869.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McKinley, William 1843- (search)
ediately operated upon. For some days the reports of his condition were so favorable that the Vice-President and members of the cabinet, who had been summoned to Buffalo, felt at liberty to return to their homes, but on Friday the President grew weaker and weaker, and breathed his last on Saturday, Sept. 14, 1901, at a quarter past two o'clock in the morning. The body lay in state in the City Hall, Buffalo, and in the Capitol at Washington. The last ceremonies were held in the Methodist Church at Canton, O. The President's address at the Pan-American Exposition, Sept. 5, 1901. the italicized headings to the various subdivisions of this address are been added to make reference easy.) President Milburn, Director-General Buchanan, Commissioners, Ladies and Gentlemen,—I am glad to be again in the city of Buffalo and exchange greetings with her people, to whose generous hospitality I am not a stranger and with whose goodwill I have been repeatedly and signally honored. To
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Marshall, Orsamus Holmes 1813-1884 (search)
Marshall, Orsamus Holmes 1813-1884 Historian; born in Franklin, Conn., Feb. 13, 1813; graduated at Union College in 1831; admitted to the bar in 1834; and practised in Buffalo till 1867. His publications include Champlain's expedition in 1613-15 against the Onondagas; The expedition of the Marquis de Nouville in 1689 against the Senecas; La Salle's first visit to the Senecas in 1699; Historical sketches of the Niagara frontier; The building and the voyage of the Griffon in 1679; and The h3, 1813; graduated at Union College in 1831; admitted to the bar in 1834; and practised in Buffalo till 1867. His publications include Champlain's expedition in 1613-15 against the Onondagas; The expedition of the Marquis de Nouville in 1689 against the Senecas; La Salle's first visit to the Senecas in 1699; Historical sketches of the Niagara frontier; The building and the voyage of the Griffon in 1679; and The history of the New York charter, 1664–;74. He died in Buffalo, N. Y., July 9, 188
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Moulton, Joseph White 1789-1875 (search)
Moulton, Joseph White 1789-1875 Historian; born in Stratford, Conn., in June, 1789; practised law in Buffalo and in New York City; and afterwards removed to Roslyn, N. Y., where he engaged entirely in historical research. His publications include A history of the State of New York (with John V. N. Yates); Chancery practice of New York; View of the City of New Orange as it was in 1673, etc. He died in Roslyn, N. Y., April 20, 1875.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Music and musicians in the United States. (search)
e of Bruck's ArminiusSept. 22, 1891 Saengerfest closes with final concert in Madison Square GardenJune 25, 1894 Principal musical societies in the United States. Organized. Baltimore, Md.Oratorio Society1880 Boston, Mass.Handel and Haydn Society1816 Apollo Club1871 Boylston Club1872 The Cecilia1876 Boston Symphony Orchestra.1880 Brooklyn, N. Y.Brooklyn Philharmonic Society1857 Apollo Club1877 Apollo Club1877 Amphion Musical Society1879 Caecilia Ladies' Vocal Society.1883 Buffalo, N. Y.Liedertafel1848 Orpheus Singing Society1869 Chicago, Ill.Apollo Musical Club1871 Cincinnati, O.Apollo Club1881 Cleveland, O.Cleveland Vocal Society1872 Bach Society1878 Milwaukee, Wis.Musik-Verein1849 Minneapolis, Minn.Gounod Club1883 Newark, N. J.Schubert Vocal Society1880 New York CityPhilharmonic Society1842 Deutscher Liederkranz1847 Mendelssohn Glee Club1865 Oratorio Society1873 Symphony Society1878 Philadelphia, Pa.Orpheus Club1871 The Cecilian1874 Pittsburg, Pa.The M
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Myer, Albert James 1827- (search)
ecial duty in the signal service, and in the latter year he was appointed chief signal-officer, with the rank of major. In June, 1861, he was made chief signalofficer on General Butler's staff, and afterwards on that of General McClellan, and was very active during the whole peninsular campaign. Colonel Myer took charge of the signal bureau in Washington, March 3, 1863, and for service at various points, and especially in giving timely signals that saved the fort and garrison at Allatoona, Ga., he was brevetted through all the grades from lieutenant-colonel to brigadier-general. In 1866 he was appointed colonel and signal-officer of the United States army, and introduced a course of signal studies at West Point and Annapolis. He was the author of the weather-signal system, and its chief till his death, in Buffalo, N. Y., Aug. 24, 1880. In 1873 he was a delegate to the International Meteorological Congress at Vienna. He published a Manual of signals for the United States army.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8