Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Buffalo, N. Y. (New York, United States) or search for Buffalo, N. Y. (New York, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 139 results in 71 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Roosevelt, Theodore 1858-1893 (search)
e of the convention. When the President was shot, Mr. Roosevelt hastened to Buffalo, but on the assurance of the physicians that the President was recovering fromy, but was recalled when the symptoms of gangrene-poisoning set in. He reached Buffalo on the morning of Sept. 14, and took the oath of office before Judge John R. H President McKinley was shot by an anarchist while attending the exposition at Buffalo, and died in that city on the 14th of that month. Of the last seven electede cabinet officers to place thereat the government exhibits which have been at Buffalo, promising to pay the necessary expenses. I have taken the responsibility of ce the small sum necessary for this purpose. The Pan-American exposition at Buffalo has just closed. Both from the industrial and the artistic stand-point this exposition has been in a high degree creditable and useful, not merely to Buffalo, but to the United States. The terrible tragedy of the President's assassination in
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), St. Albans, (search)
bans, Franklin County, and First National banks. They overpowered the few employes of the banks then on duty, secured an aggregate of $211,150 in bank-notes, seized all the horses they could find, and rode off hastily towards Canada. The party numbered between thirty and forty, and the entire proceeding occupied only about twenty minutes. Nearly the entire party was subsequently captured by the Canadian authorities. In 1867 the town was again a centre of public interest. An invasion of Canada from the United States had been arranged for the spring by members of the Fenian Brotherhood. Buffalo, N. Y., and Detroit, Mich., were chosen as the principal rendezvous, and St. Albans, Vt., and Odgensburg, N. Y., as depots for the accumulation of arms and stores, and as points of departure for subordinate contingents of the army of invasion. The vigilance of the United States government and lack of harmony among the Fenian leaders prevented anything more serious than a border excitement.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sands, Joshua Ratoon 1795-1883 (search)
7-48, and was at different times commander of the East India, Mediterranean, and Brazilian squadrons. He died in Baltimore, Md., Oct. 2, 1883. Sandusky, a city and port of entry in Erie county, O.; on Lake Erie, at the mouth of the Sandusky River. Near by is Johnson's Island, on which 2,500 Confederate officers who had been taken prisoners were confined in 1863. During the summer a plot was formed to liberate these prisoners and in connection with this act to burn or otherwise destroy Buffalo and other lake cities. An expedition for these objects was organized in Canada. The plans of the Confederate sympathizers became known to the American consulgeneral in Montreal, who immediately notified the Canadian authorities. By Nov. 11, the governor-general had gained sufficient information to warrant his notifying Lord Lyons, the British minister at Washington, of the plot. Lord Lyons promptly communicated with the United States government, and by midnight of the same day Secretary
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Scott, Winfield 1786-1866 (search)
ion of Congress. The President was already vested with power to retaliate, but he never had occasion to do so. After his exchange, under General Dearborn, he commanded the advance in the attack on Fort George, May 27, 1813, where he was badly burned by the explosion of the magazine. In the fall he commanded the advance of Wilkinson's army in its descent of the St. Lawrence to attack Montreal. In the spring of 1814 he was made a brigadier-general, established a camp of instruction at Buffalo, and early in July gained a victory over the British at Chippewa (see Chippewa, battle of). Later in the month he fought successfully in the battle of Lundy's Lane (q. v.), where he was seriously wounded in the shoulder, which left one of his arms partially disabled. For his services in that battle he received the thanks of Congress and a gold medal. At the close of the war he was promoted to major-general, with the thanks of Congress and a gold medal for his services, and was sent to Eur
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ship-building. (search)
, and could hardly have been anticipated by its framers. In the first place, it debars the shipbuilders on the lakes from competing for the construction of such government warvessels as can pass the Canadian canals. This is a discrimination against a large and important industry which should not be tolerated except for the most urgent reasons. The American Ship-building Company now has nine plants on the lakes, located at West Superior, Milwaukee, Chicago, Bay City, Detroit, Wyandotte, Buffalo, Cleveland, and Lorraine. There are three other yards on the lakes, at Bay City, Port Huron, and Toledo. Owing to their proximity to the coal and iron deposits, all these lake ship-yards can compete successfully with any of the yards in this country or elsewhere. They have built several light-ships and other vessels for the Treasury Department, and have been, as we have seen, the lowest bidders for some of the naval vessels. The government is thus a loser as well by being deprived of th
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Standard time. (search)
c time). The true local time of any place is slower or faster than the standard time as the place is east or west of the time meridian; thus, the true local time at Boston, Mass., is sixteen minutes faster than eastern standard time, while at Buffalo, N. Y., it is sixteen minutes slower, the seventy-fifth time meridian being half-way between Boston and Buffalo. Local time and standard time agree at Denver, Col., as Standish's sword and musket-barrel. Denver is on the 105th meridian, that of l time of any place is slower or faster than the standard time as the place is east or west of the time meridian; thus, the true local time at Boston, Mass., is sixteen minutes faster than eastern standard time, while at Buffalo, N. Y., it is sixteen minutes slower, the seventy-fifth time meridian being half-way between Boston and Buffalo. Local time and standard time agree at Denver, Col., as Standish's sword and musket-barrel. Denver is on the 105th meridian, that of the mountain section.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Steam navigation. (search)
boat on the western rivers, a stern-wheeler, is built by Fulton at Pittsburg1811 Comet, first passenger steamboat built in Europe, by Henry Bell, runs on the Clyde 7 1/2 miles per hour. Jan. 18,1812 Steam ferry between New York and Jersey City1812 First steam-vessel on the Thames, brought by Mr. Dodd from Glasgow1815 First steamboat on the Great Lakes, the Ontario, built at Sackett's Harbor, N. Y.1816 Walk-in-the-Water, a steamboat for Lake Erie, launched at Black Rock (now part of Buffalo, N. Y.)May 28, 1818 Savannah, Capt. Stevens Rogers, a steamboat of 350 tons, built in New York City, crosses the Atlantic from Savannah to Liverpool in twenty-six days, during eighteen of which she uses her paddles Off Cape Clear she is mistaken for a ship on fire, and pursued by the British cutter Kite. She sails from Savannah, Ga.May 24, 1819 First sea-going steam-vessel of iron, the Aaron Manby, is constructed at the Horsley Iron Works, England1821 First steam voyage to India made by the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Steinwehr, Adolph Wilhelm Friedrich 1822-1877 (search)
is father and grandfather were in the Prussian military service, and he was educated at the military academy of Brunswick. He came to the United States in 1847, and offered his services to the government in the war against Mexico. He failed to get a commission in the army, and returned to Germany. Coming again to the United States in 1854, he settled on a farm in Connecticut; and when the Civil War broke out he raised a regiment in New York, and with it fought in the battle of Bull Run. In the fall of 1861 he was made brigadier-general, and commanded the 2d Brigade of Blenker's division. After the organization of the Army of Virginia Steinwehr was appointed to command the 2d Division of Sigel's corps, and was active in the campaign in Virginia from August to December, 1862. He was in the battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg in 1863. General Steinwehr published A topographical map of the United States, and The Centennial Gazetteer. He died in Buffalo, N. Y., Feb. 25, 1877.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stevens, Thomas Holdup 1795-1841 (search)
Stevens, Thomas Holdup 1795-1841 Naval officer; born in Charleston, S. C., Feb. 22, 1795; original name Holdup, Stevens being added by legislative enactment in 1815. He entered the United States navy in 1808, and was made lieutenant in July, 1813. In 1812 he volunteered for lake service, and in December he was severely wounded by a canistershot through his hand while storming a battery at Black Rock, near Buffalo. In the summer of 1813 he superintended the fitting and rigging of Perry's fleet at Erie, and in the battle, Sept. 10, he commanded the sloop Trippe, behaving gallantly. He died in Washington, D. C., Jan. 22, 1841. Naval officer; born in Middletown, Conn., May 27, 1819; son of the preceding; entered the navy in 1836; was active in operations on the Southern coast, and in movements against Mobile in the Civil War. He was specially distinguished in operations against Forts Wagner and Sumter in 1863, and in the capture of the Confederate fleet and of Fort Morga
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stoneman, George 1822-1894 (search)
7,000 bales of cotton, a vast amount of ammunition, provisions, and clothing, and the railway tracks in each direction. The Union prisoners had been removed. On April 17 Stoneman started for east Tennessee. On the 19th Maj. E. E. C. Moderwell, with 250 cavalry, burned the fine bridge of the Charlotte and South Carolina Railroad, 1,150 feet in length and 50 feet above the water, over the Catawba. It was a blackened ruin in the space of thirty minutes. After a sharp skirmish with Confederate cavalry, the raiders returned to their main body at Dallas, with 325 prisoners, 200 horses, and two pieces of artillery. During the course of the raid the National cavalry captured 6,000 prisoners, twenty-five pieces of artillery taken in action, twenty-one abandoned, and a large number of small-arms. In March, 1865, General Stoneman was brevetted major-general, United States army, and in 1871 was retired. He was governor of California in 1883-87. He died in Buffalo, N. Y., Sept. 5, 1894.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8