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George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 4 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 4 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 4 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 3 1 Browse Search
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lson at Richmond, Ky. Bragg captures 4,000 men at Munfordsville advances to Frankfort, and inaugurates Richard Hawes as Governor of Kentucky Buell follows him frosville, Bragg continued his unresisted march northward, through Bardstown, to Frankfort, Oct. 1. the State capital, where Smith had preceded him, and where Richarthan a pretentious farce: hardly was it completed when the Yankees threatened Frankfort; and the newly installed Governor had to flee from their approach. Gen. Buset his face toward the enemy; Oct. 1. moving in five columns: his left on Frankfort, his right on Shepardsville, intending to concentrate on Bardstown, where Brao of his three divisions — that of Gen. Sill having been detached and sent to Frankfort — had directed the posting of his troops and formation of his line of battle-h on this adventure. Sill's division — which had followed Kirby Smith from Frankfort, and had had a little fight with his rearguard near Lawrenceburg — reached P
f, the master has recovered his servant and taken him away. I need hardly remind you that there will always be found some lawless and mischievous persons in every army; but I assure you that the mass of this army is lawabiding, and that it is neither its disposition nor its policy to violate law or the rights of individuals in any particular. With great respect, your obedient servant, D. C. Buell, Brig.-Gen. Commanding Department. Hon. J. R. Underwood, Chairman Military Committee, Frankfort, Ky. Gen. Joseph Hooker, commanding on the Upper Potomac, issued March 26, 1862. the following order: To brigade and regimental commanders of this division: Messrs. Nally, Gray, Dunnington, Dent, Adams, Speake, Price, Posey, and Cobey, citizens of Maryland, have negroes supposed to be with some of the regiments of this division: the Brigadier-General commanding directs that they be permitted to visit all the camps of his command, in search of their property; and, if found, t
lad to surrender. It is added that the Rebels were nearly out of ammunition. It is to be hoped that they paroled their prisoners not to serve again during the War, unless on their side. Gen. Burbridge, who had promptly started on Morgan's track, had, by a forced march of 90 miles, struck June 9. him heavily at Mount Sterling; Morgan decamping at the close to continue his career. Part of his force entered Lexington at 2 next morning, burned the railroad depot, and left, heading for Frankfort and Georgetown. Part of Cynthiana was burned by another detachment. But, near that place, Burbridge fell June 12. on the Rebel raiders while at breakfast; killing and wounding 300 of them, capturing 400, beside 1,000 horses, and liberating some of Hobson's men. Hobson and staff were recaptured soon afterward. Our loss in this. conflict flict was but 150. Morgan fled to south-western Virginia with the wreck of his command, which was no longer a force. He had only gathered a small b
soon visited Washington, expressly to protest against, and (if possible) to obviate, this enrollment of negroes, or at least to render its execution less offensive and annoying to their masters — finding the President disposed to do whatever he could to reconcile the Kentuckians to the bitter prescription. Mr. Lincoln was induced to put the substance of lis observations at their interview into the following letter: Executive Mansion, Washington, April 4, 1864. A. G. Hodges, Esq., Frankfort, Ky.: my dear Sir: You ask me to put in writing the substance of what I verbally said the other day, in your presence, to Gov. Bramlette and Senator Dixon. It was about as follows: I am naturally anti-Slavery. If Slavery is not wrong, nothing is wrong. I can not remember when I did not so think and feel; and yet I have never understood that the Presidency conferred upon me an unrestricted right to act officially upon this judgment and feeling. It was in the oath I took that I would
every stipulation on his part. I am, sir, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, S. B. Buckner, Inspector-General. To His Excellency B. Magoffin, Frankfort, Kentucky. General Buckner to Governor Magoffin. Headquarters Ky. State Guards, Paducah, June 15, 1861. sir:--On the 11th inst., I advised Governor Harrisennessee forces are peremptory. I am, sir, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, S. B. Buckner, Inspector-General. To His Excellency B. Magoffin, Frankfort, Kentucky. General Buckner to Governor Magoffin. Headquarters Ky. State Guards, Paducah, June 15, 1861. sir:--On the afternoon of the 12th instant I reacof instructions to Col. Tilghman. I am, sir, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, S. B. Buckner, Inspector-General. To His Excellency B. Magoffin, Frankfort, Ky. General Buckner to Colonel Tilghman. Headquarters Ky. State Guards, Paducah, June 15, 1861. sir:--The Commander-in-Chief directs that you call int
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 45.-skirmish at Patterson's Creek. Col. Wallace's official report. (search)
Doc. 45.-skirmish at Patterson's Creek. Col. Wallace's official report. Cumberland, June 27. To General McClellan:-- I have been accustomed to sending my mounted pickets, thirteen men in all, to different posts along the several approaches to Cumberland. Finding it next to impossible to get reliable information of the enemy yesterday, I united the thirteen, and directed them, if possible, to proceed to Frankfort, a town midway between this place and Romney, to see if there were rebel troops there. They went within a quarter of a mile of the place, and found it full of cavalry. Returning they overtook forty horsemen, and at once charged on them, routing and driving them back more than a mile, killing eight of them, and securing seventeen horses. Corporal Hayes, in command of my men, was desperately wounded with sabre cuts and bullets. Taking him back they halted about an hour, and were then attacked by the enemy, who were reinforced to about seventy-five men. The attack
d that they bore an important communication from Davis to the President of the United States. Col. Porter requested them to dismount, and approach with it on foot, a measure of precaution rendered necessary by the fact that the officer bearing the flag was accompanied by a larger escort than that (twelve men) incident to the presence of a flag of truce. His request was complied with, and he found their representation correct. The disunion officer proved to be a Capt. Tom Taylor, of Frankfort, Ky., (a connection of Old Zack's,) who bore a sealed letter from Jeff. Davis to President Lincoln, according to a representation upon its back, written and signed by Beauregard at Manassas, explaining the fact, and asking that Capt. Taylor might be facilitated in his mission. Col. Porter accordingly sent Capt. Taylor and his missive forward with an officer and an orderly, and directed the disunion escort to return forthwith into their own lines-himself and the picket guard with him, follo
duals in Fulton County, contrary to law and the authority of the Military Board, and said Military Board having passed the following order: military Board, Frankfort, Aug. 1, 1861. On motion of General Dudley, Resolved, That his Excellency, the Governor, be requested to take such steps as he may think best calculated fostated, forthwith to deliver up the same to the judge of the county court of the county in which he resides, to be returned by said judge to the State arsenal at Frankfort; and I make this appeal to the loyalty of such citizens in good faith, believing that they will promptly manifest such a signal poof of their fidelity to the lawgainst all disobedient offenders. [L. S.] In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my name, and caused the seal of the Commonwealth to be affixed. Done at Frankfort, this, the 3d day of August, A. D. 1861, and in the seventieth year of the Commonwealth. By the Governor, B. Magoffin. Thomas B. Monroe, Jr., Secretary of S
trality. Correspondence between Gov. Magoffin and President Lincoln. Commonwealth of Kentucky, Executive Dept., Frankfort, August 19, 1861. To his Excellency, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States: sir: From the commencement of Lincoln. Correspondence between Gov. Magoffin and Jefferson Davis. Commonwealth of Kentucky, Executive Dept., Frankfort, August 19, 1861. To Hon. Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States: sir: This is to accredit to you Geo.ed of the existing posture of public affairs in Kentucky. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, B. Magoffin. Frankfort, Ky., September 3, 1861. His Excellency B. Magoffin, Governor of Kentucky: sir: In conformity with your request, I proc I am, sir, very respectfully your obedient servant, George W. Johnson. Commonwealth of Kentucky, Executive Dept., Frankfort, August 24, 1861. Hon. Jefferson Davis, Richmond, Va.: sir: Since the commencement of the unhappy difficulties pendi
ept. 9, 1861. Gov. B. Magoffin: A military necessity having required me to occupy this town, I have taken possession of it by the forces under my command. The circumstances leading to this act were reported promptly to the President of the Confederate States. His reply was, the necessity justified the action. A copy of my proclamation I have the honor to transmit you by mail. Respectfully, Leonidas Polk, Major-General Commanding. Columbus, Ky., Sept. 9, 1861. Gov. B. Magoffin, Frankfort, Ky.: I should have despatched you immediately as the troops under my command took possession of this position, the very few words I addressed to the people here; but my duties since that time have so pressed me, that I have but now the first leisure time to communicate with you. It will be sufficient for me to inform you, which my short address here will do, that I had information, on which I could rely, that the Federal forces intended and were preparing to seize Columbus. I need not de
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