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Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 12 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 1, 1864., [Electronic resource] 11 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 11 5 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 11 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 10 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 9 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 8 0 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 23 (search)
essantly, and these brave men in their rifle-pits, some in water nearly waist deep, resisted suc. cessfully every effort made to dislodge them. Following up the advance made by the Ninety-ninth Ohio, with the Eighty-fourth and Thirty-fifth Indiana and Fifty-first Ohio, we again threw up works and held the advance gained. The skirmishing was very severe. June 19, the rebels, being hard pressed, had again vacated their position and left their formidable works. We pursued along the road to Marietta. Between two and three miles the enemy were again found in force in strong earth-works. This brigade went into line with heavy skirmishing, the right of my skirmishers having to wade and stand in a swamp with the water above the knees. June 20, advanced my front line and again threw up strong works; the: enemy's position was such that he could enfilade as far as the range of his guns our lines, right and left. I was ordered to dislodge him. My skirmishers, under the command of Lieutenan
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 24 (search)
on the 3d instant, the enemy being gone, the brigade was assembled and massed in an open field and awaited orders for pursuit. At 7 a. m., pursuant to orders, the brigade took up the line of march, bringing up the rear of the division. Leaving Marietta to the left, we proceeded down the Atlanta railroad to a point four miles south of Marietta, where the enemy was found intrenched. Here the brigade was ordered to mass into column of regiments, and encamp for the night. The Thirty-fifth IndiaMarietta, where the enemy was found intrenched. Here the brigade was ordered to mass into column of regiments, and encamp for the night. The Thirty-fifth Indiana was detailed to picket the brigade front. Next morning, the 4th instant, being ordered to strengthen and advance the line of skirmishers, I ordered the Forty-fifth Ohio to the support of the Thirty-fifth Indiana, and immediately advanced the line. The Thirty-fifth Indiana made a brilliant charge on the enemy's skirmish line (which was nearly equal in strength to a line of battle), and, being well supported by the Forty-fifth Ohio, carried the rifle-pits and held them, although exposed to a
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 26 (search)
rom July 1, 1864, to the fall of Atlanta: On July 1 the regiment was stationed in front of Kenesaw Mountain, Ga., occupying a reserve position in rear of the second line of our works. On the evening of the 2d the regiment changed position to the left with the brigade, taking the place of the Second Division, Fourth Corps, which moved out. The following morning, the enemy having evacuated their position on Kenesaw Mountain, the regiment took the line of march in pursuit, passing through Marietta, coming up again with the enemy about four miles south of that place. Here the brigade was ordered to halt for the night, the Thirty-fifth being detailed to picket the brigade front. Early next morning orders were received to advance our lines with a view to drive back the enemy's skirmishers, capture their rifle-pits, if possible, and thereby check an enfilading fire which seriously annoyed the troops on our right. The length of our lines at this time was about 500 yards, and extended t
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 27 (search)
s. The assault failed with heavy loss to our arms. Heavy skirmishing and artillery firing kept up on both sides until the night of July 2, when the enemy retreated under cover of the night and loosed their hold on Kenesaw Mountain and vacated Marietta. July 3, pursued the enemy early, my brigade in advance. The Fifty-ninth Illinois, the first to enter Marietta, found the enemy in the evening five miles from that place on the Atlanta road strongly intrenched. July 4, celebrated our nationalMarietta, found the enemy in the evening five miles from that place on the Atlanta road strongly intrenched. July 4, celebrated our national anniversary by a charge over a large corn-field, carried the enemrry's outer works, capturing many prisoners, with a loss of 89 killed and wounded in my brigade, and held the position until night, under the cover of which the enemy withdrew four miles to the Chattahoochee River. Captain Hale, brigade officer of the day, of the Seventy-fifth Illinois, one of the best officers in the army, fell here. July 5, pursued the enemy (Wood's division in front) to the river. Continued skirmishing unt
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 30 (search)
body could be exposed above the works only as a mark for the rebel sharpshooters. Second Lieut. Richard L. Mangan, Company D, receives gunshot wound, causing amputation of left leg. The casualties of that day were 3 men wounded and 2 killed. On the morning of June 27 our forces are massed for an assault on the works of the enemy in our immediate front, this division (the First) remaining in position for any emergency. July 3, in obedience of brigade commander, this regiment marched toward Marietta, passing the town at about noon. At night we again came upon the enemy, form line, build temporary works in an exposed position, and had 3 men wounded. On the morning of the 4th of July the two armies are facing each other, ours in readiness for the attack. At about 10 a. m. one company, under command Lieut. James H. Blodgett, Company E, was sent forward as support to the skirmish line, which was to charge in a cleared field. After advancing about one-half mile to a ravine, the whole li
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 31 (search)
Had 2 killed and 2 wounded on that day. Remained there during the 28th and 29th. On the 30th, at dark, marched to the right of brigade in front line and connected my left with Thirty-sixth Indiana. On Ist of July remained in our works under an artillery fire. On 2d was under fire during day, and at dark marched to left, and in reserve line of brigade. Marched at daylight of the 3d in the rear of Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania, through the enemy's evacuated works, passing near Marietta, Ga. In the evening formed in line in front of the enemy on left of brigade, my right connecting with Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania, and built works. My skirmish company during the day captured 6 prisoners. We marched during the day four miles. On the 4th, at 10 a. in., I was ordered by Colonel Grose to take the enemy's rifle-pits in my front. I was given my points of direction, and was ordered to take my regiment out in front of the works, and when the brigade began to advance, I was to ch
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
t; regiment was mustered to-day. July 1, hold the same position on the second line. Nothing of importance transpired until evening, when a brisk cannonading was opened along our lines and continued a considerable time. July 2, remained in second line until evening, when the left wing moved to the front line, and one company was sent out for picket. July 3, the enemy evacuated our front during the night, and [his works] were soon after occupied by our troops. We followed them through Marietta and three miles beyond, where they again made a stand. We encamped for the night. July 4, there was considerable fighting during the day. Our brigade charged over an open field, driving the rebels handsomely, and captured a number of prisoners. We held our lines and constructed works. My regiment built three separate lines of works during the day. Relieved the Fifty-ninth Illinois on the front line just after dark, and worked all night on the works partially constructed by them. Our lo
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 33 (search)
am ordered on the front line. Take position to left of previous one. Joined on-right by Fifty-ninth Illinois, and on left by Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania. Immediately commence repairing mny works, working by detail of two commissioned officers and fifty men on each relief. At 3 a. m. July 3 I received orders to quit work and prepare for move at once. This being done, at 5 a. m. we move forward and occupy enemy's work, he having evacuated. We pursue the enemy and strike the Atlanta and Marietta road at the Military Institute, near the latter place. Here a halt of a few hours is made, when the march is again resumed. We move on right of railroad, and at 4 p. m. we file from railroad to left and form in order of battle, my regiment occupying same position in the line'as the night previous. After forming we lay a short time and are ordered forward to top of hill in our front; here a temporary line of works are thrown up in which we remain during the night. The next morning at 11
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 35 (search)
ment were 3 enlisted men wounded. On Thursday, June 30, at dark, my regiment was relieved by another regiment of our brigade, and we moved back to the second line and encamped. On Friday, July 1, we continued in camp on the second line. On Saturday, July 2, the regiment again moved forward to the front line; no casualties. On Sunday, July 3, about 2 a. m., the rebels evacuated their works, and we moved forward at once and occupied them. Took several prisoners. We then moved forward to Marietta and five miles beyond to Smyrna, where we found the enemy strongly fortified. On Monday, July 4, at 11 a.,m. we charged the enemy's works, capturing the rifle-pits, with a large number of prisoners, and killing and wounding several of the enemy; our loss was 1 commissioned officer wounded and 1 enlisted man killed, and 17 enlisted men wounded. During the night the enemy fell back to the Chattahoochee River and left us in full possession of their strong works at Smyrna, which we immediatel
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
ims of others to state that General Kimball, commanding First Brigade; Colonel Bradley, commanding Fiftyfirst Illinois; Colonel Opdycke, commanding One hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and Colonel Lane, Ninetyseventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry, distinguished themselves by their conduct on this occasion. From this time until July 2 the division remained in old camp. July 2, moved to the left and relieved General Wood. On this night the enemy retired. July 3, marched through Marietta, General Stanley leading. Formed at Neal Dow Station, to the left and rear of General Stanley's division, which had encountered the enemy there. July 4, moved forward and formed on the left of General Stanley, who had advanced his skirmish and main lines, took some of the enemy's rifle-pits and captured prisoners. The enemy retired this night. July 5, marched, following General Wood, who had a skirmish with the enemy's cavalry near Pace's Ferry, driving them over it. Encamped near Vinin
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