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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 37 (search)
ade for that purpose by Major Sabin, of the Forty-fourth Illinois Infantry, my brigade officer of the day, and Lieutenant-Colonel Martin, of Arkansas, the officer of the day for the enemy in our front. My command remained in the same position as before the action, until I was ordered by you to relieve a part of Wood's division toward our left on the 2d of July. That night the enemy evacuated their position at Kenesaw Mountain, and on the 3d the brigade marched with the division through Marietta and bivouacked near the railroad about four miles south of that place. During the day of the 4th of July my command was engaged in hotly skirmishing with the enemy, who retired during the night, and on the 5th the march was continued to Vining's Station, near which place my command was bivouacked between the railroad and the Chattahoochee River. On the 6th the division was moved to a position along the southerly bank of the Rottenwood Creek, where I was bivouacked on the left of the line,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 39 (search)
sses in the charge were heavy, comprising about 33 per cent. of the officers and men present for duty. Here fell Colonel Miller, mortally wounded, a brave and patriotic young officer of rare ability. The command of the regiment now devolved upon Captain McNeal. For a short time, commencing a few days previous to this, I make my report from data in possession of the adjutant, being myself absent sick. On the 2d day of July, the enemy having left our front, the regiment marched through Marietta, Ga., toward the Chattahoochee River, crossed the river at Roswell on the 9th, and with the rest of the brigade fortified a position on the left bank of the stream. Several unimportant changes were made, when on the 18th of July the regiment marched with the army toward Atlanta, Ga. Was in battle on the left bank of Peach Tree Creek July 20. Our loss was very light and that of the enemy very severe. The regiment remained in camp near Atlanta until August 1, when with the rest of the brigad
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 42 (search)
igned, being senior officer, assumed command of the regiment and brought it off the field. June 28, 1 man was wounded this day. Lay in these works until July 2, when, at 9 p. m., moved to left one mile, and at 12 m. relieved Third Division in works. July 3, at 3 a. m. this morning it was discovered that the rebels had evacuated all the works around Kenesaw and the mountain itself. Troops were immediately sent in pursuit. The regiment moved out at 7 a. m., and at 11 a. m. stacked arms in Marietta. Moved on, and at 7.30 p. m. camped at Smyrna Camp-Ground, the regiment going on picket. July 4, the regiment was on the skirmish line all day, advancing one and a half miles, driving the enemy from their rifle-pits under a heavy fire. Loss this day, 7 men wounded, 2 of them mortally. July 5, moved out at 7 a. m., advancing slowly. Constant skirmishing in the advance. At 3 p. m. halted and camped at Vining's Station. Remained at this place until July 7. At 8 a. m. moved two miles to
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 45 (search)
eployed my regiment and covered our left flank, in which position I remained until I received orders from Brig. Gen. N. Kimball, commanding First Brigade, to withdraw my regiment to take our old position we had left in the morning. The order was carried out in good order. We were kept in reserve until the 30th of June, when the regiment took position on the left of the front line, where we remained until July 2, 8 p. m., when we moved to the left. Marched again on the 3d of July. Passed Marietta. Remained all the day on the 4th of July in camp in line of battle. Moved on the 5th. Encamped near the Chattahoochee River. Changed camps on the 7th of July. Marched to Roswell July 9. Crossed the Chattahoochee River the same night. Recrossed the river on the 12th. Arrived in camp again on the 13th of July. Crossed the river again on the 14th. Stayed in camp until July the 18th. Resumed our march again.. Camped that night near Buck Head. Left camp in the evening of the 19th; cr
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 46 (search)
orarily of Adjutant Horace Buchanan, who was quite severely wounded. On the night of the 27th I was on picket, on which tour of duty I lost several men wounded. I remained in the position behind the works until the 2d day of July, when I was relieved from my position and ordered to a position about a mile to the left of my former one. On the morning of the 3d it was again found that the enemy had left our front. The march was taken up and continued until about five miles south of Marietta, where the enemy was found. This position was evacuated on the morning of the 5th of July. The line of march was immediately taken up in pursuit, and on the night of the 5th we camped on the north bank of the Chattahoochee River. Remained in this position with a slight change of camp until the 13th, on which day we crossed the Chattahoochee River and went into camp, where we remained until the 18th. On the night of the 19th crossed Peach Tree Creek and took position near where the batt
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 47 (search)
charge. Nothing of importance occurred in my command until the night of the 2d of July, when the enemy evacuated their strong hold at Kenesaw, and retreated toward the Chattahoochee River. On the morning of the 3d I was ordered to march to Marietta, and from thence in pursuit of the enemy, whom we found strongly intrenched some five miles distant, in a southerly direction. The 4th of July was spent in skirmishing with the enemy, who were driven into their main works, the same which they e my command for the month of May: Zzz G. D. Wagner, Brigadier-General, Commanding. Capt. James S. Ransom, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., Second Div., 4th Army Corps. Hdqrs. Second Brig., Second Div., 4TH Army Corps, In the Field, near Marietta, Ga., June 25, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to submit the following report of casualties in my command from June 4 to June 24, inclusive: Zzz Very respectfully, G. D. Wagner, Brigadier-General, Commanding. Capt. J. S. Ransom, Act
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 48 (search)
umns, and during the remainder of the battle my regiment operated with and as a part of this, the deployment, however, remaining complete. I remained on skirmish line after the assault had been abandoned until nearly night-fall, when I rejoined the brigade at its situation of the morning by order of Colonel Opdycke, division officer of the day. The position remained unchanged until July 3, on the night of which the enemy again evacuated his position, giving the Federal troops possession of Marietta. On July 5 I took part in pursuit of the rebels to within one mile of the Chattahoochee River, near which place we were put regularly in camp. July 9, my regiment with the other troops of the division moved to Roswell, fourteen miles above the railroad bridge over Chattahoochee, where we crossed to south side of same. On July 12, being relieved by the troops of General Dodge's command, moved back to the camp from which the march had been made on the 9th. Crossed to south side of the
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 49 (search)
rtally. June 27, we participated in the charge made that day on the enemy's works, occupying position in the second line of battle, and lost in killed 3 enlisted men and 21 wounded, 2 mortally. Lieutenant Foster, Company A, was also wounded. I was wounded myself in this engagement and was succeeded in command of the regiment by Captain Adair, Company I. July 3, after the enemy had evacuated their works near Kenesaw Mountain, the regiment moved forward, with the column five miles, via Marietta. July 4, had some skirmishing with the enemy and built works for defense. Loss in the skirmish 1 man. On the 5th marched to the Chattahoochee, near Vining's Stations Lieutenant- Colonel Squires returned from absent sick and took command of the regiment. On the 7th moved up the river about two miles, where the regiment was put on picket and remained until the 12th, while the most of the division went on a raid across the Chattahoochee. On the 13th crossed the Chattahoochee, advanced some
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 50 (search)
General Harker, the very gallant commander of the brigade, was shot in the endeavor to carry the men up to a second charge. The brigade retired to its position behind the works, where it remained without material change until July 2, when we moved 500 yards to the left and occupied the ground vacated by one of General Wood's brigades. On the morning of July 3 advanced the skirmish line at daybreak, and took possession of the enemy's works, which we found deserted. At 7 a. m. marched for Marietta, and after a short halt, then continued the march about six miles, camping in front of a new line occupied by the enemy. July 4, we moved out about 9 a. m., and took possession, after considerable skirmishing, and commenced fortifying. Discovered signs of the enemy withdrawing in the night; we advanced the picket at daylight in the morning, and found the works deserted. Marched at 8 a. m. of the 5th and took the line of railroad, following Vood's division. The enemy crossed the Chattaho
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 51 (search)
ly in more than one respect. In the first place, we were forced to witness the fatal fall of our beloved commander, Brig. Gen. C. G. Harker, who fell mortally wounded in the very midst of our ranks, and then we were forced to fall back without having accomplished our object, and with a loss of 1 officer and 3 enlisted men killed, and 20 enlisted men wounded and 2 officers. We remained in camp until the 3d of July, when we again commenced our pursuit of the fleet-footed foe, passed through Marietta on the 3d, and followed the enemy four miles south, and on the next day we celebrated the glorious 4th of July by skirmishing nearly all day, and succeeded in capturing some rifle-pits and several prisoners; had 6 of our men wounded during the day. The enemy falling back in the night, compelled us to follow them the 5th, in order that Johnston might get Sherman just where he wanted him, viz, on the north side the Chattahoochee River, and himself on the south side, and the (of course) bridge
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