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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 71 (search)
engaged in battle near Resaca, Ga., suffering a loss of 4 enlisted men killed and 16 wounded. Also engaged May 27, near Dallas, Ga., with a loss of 11 enlisted men killed, 32 wounded, and 6 missing. June 1, while on picket near Dallas, Ga., lost 1 enlisted man killed and 1 wounded. June 17, our loss was 1 enlisted man killed and 5 wounded. June 23, near Kenesaw Mountain, had a severe skirmish, losing 1 captain and 2 enlisted men killed and 37 enlisted men wounded. July 3, moved through Marietta, Ga. July 4, skirmished with the enemy, losing 3 enlisted men wounded. July 5, four companies were detailed to assist in holding the rebel pontoon bridge at Pace's Ferry. July 19, moved across Peach Tree Creek with the loss of 1 enlisted man wounded. July 22, moved into position in line of trenches near Atlanta, which we now occupy, and in which we have lost 1 enlisted man wounded by stray ball. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Danl. Bowman, Lieut.--Col., Comdg. Ninety
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 72 (search)
r works. On the morning of the 17th, the works in our front being evacuated, I was ordered to develop their position; threw out a few companies of the Ninety-third as skirmishers, advanced about two miles, driving in the enemy's skirmish line and establishing our line about 1,000 yards from their works. During the day the Ninety-third sustained a loss of 1 enlisted man killed and 5 wounded. On the night of the 19th the enemy evacuated our front, falling back to their last line in front of Marietta. On the following morning a skirmish line from the One hundred and twenty-fourth was advanced, driving the enemy into their works. On the 21st the battalion was moved to the right, and relieved a battalion of the Twentieth Army Corps. On the 23d the Ninety-third, deployed as skirmishers, charged and drove back the enemy, advancing our lines about 1,000 yards, with a loss to the Ninety-third of 1 officer killed, 2 enlisted men killed, and 37 enlisted men wounded. The battalion was no fur
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 73 (search)
is time commanded by Lieut. Col. Chesley D. Bailey. Lieut. Col. Samuel P. Oyler, of the Seventyninth Indiana Volunteers, relinquished command of that regiment on account of sickness. Command was assumed by Maj. George W. Parker. The brigade remained in the above-described position until the 2d of July, when it was moved to the right to occupy a position vacated by the Fourteenth Army Corps. The enemy having abandoned his works in the night, the brigade marched in pursuit, passing through Marietta, and bivouacked five miles beyond. On the 4th day of July the brigade was moved to the left of the Second Division, and the position fortified. While working the men were much harassed by the enemy, only a short distance off. The enemy abandoning his position during the night, the brigade marched in rear of the Second Brigade to the Chattahoochee River, near Pace's Ferry, and was there assigned its position. On the succeeding day the brigade moved to the right, so as to connect with the
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 75 (search)
as then assigned to the front line behind works, and not more than 400 yards distant from that of the enemy. On the morning of June 5 it was ascertained that the enemy had again abandoned his line of works and fallen back in the direction of Marietta, Ga. On June 6 the command again marched. Arriving near Acworth Station, Ga., went into camp and remained until June 10, when an advance was made upon the enemy, the front line skirmishing with the enemy, who, it seemed, had a well-chosen positioy thrown up and constant and heavy skirmishing continued until the morning of July 3, when the enemy was found to be evacuating his position. Marched in pursuit and came upon his rear on the evening of the 4th, about five miles southeast of Marietta, Ga. The morning of the 6th again found his works vacated. Followed him up until reaching the Chattahoochee River, where he had chosen a strong position and easy of defense. Awaiting movements of other portions of the army, we went into camp and
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 76 (search)
the 21st the rebel skirmishers were driven from their barricades in our front and we moved out with other regiments of the brigade, advancing our main line 400 yards, fortifying the position gained. These were the last works we built north of Marietta, and covered the Marietta and Dallas road. On the 24th we had 3 men wounded on the skirmish line. No movement occurred between this date and the 26th, at which time I was succeeded in command of the regiment by Colonel Cram. For casualty letta, and covered the Marietta and Dallas road. On the 24th we had 3 men wounded on the skirmish line. No movement occurred between this date and the 26th, at which time I was succeeded in command of the regiment by Colonel Cram. For casualty lists, &c., I would respectfully refer to his report. I have the honor to be, your most obedient servant, D. Bailey, Lieutenant-Colonel Ninth Kentucky Volunteers. Capt. W. S. S. Erb, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., 3d Brig.. 3d Div., 4th Army Corps.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 77 (search)
toward the enemy's works, which I did, and found them empty, the enemy having left them during the night. About 7 o'clock I received orders to march, and about 8 o'clock moved out of camp and marched with the brigade to within about one mile of Marietta, when I received orders from Colonel Knefler to halt until the train of our corps (Fourth) should arrive, and escort it, which I did, arriving in camp, about six miles below Marietta, about 9 p. in. On the morning of the 4th of July received ordMarietta, about 9 p. in. On the morning of the 4th of July received orders to march, and about 12 m. I moved with the brigade about a mile, when we came up with the enemy's skirmishers. We formed with the brigade, the regiment in the front line, and put up works under the fire of the enemy's skirmishers, having 2 men wounded. During the night the enemy evacuated his position, leaving formidable works. On the morning of the 5th I received orders to march, and at 6 o'clock we moved with the brigade to within a few hundred yards of Pace's Ferry, on the Chattahooche
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 78 (search)
and, being in the front line, we were a good deal exposed to both artillery and small-arms of the enemy. One enlisted man was killed and 1 wounded. On the night succeeding the 18th the enemy again evacuated, and we followed in the direction of Marietta; and on the 19th, and on the night succeeding that day, we encamped in rear of the First Division, Fourth Army Corps, and on the 20th moved to the right and relieved Geary's division, of the Twentieth Corps. In front of our line we could see th. He seemed on the point of expiring, but determined to complete his task, and did it, and was then taken off in an ambulance. The enemy evacuated their works again on the night following the 2d day of July, and on the 3d we passed the town of Marietta, and encamped about five miles south of it for the night, and on the 4th went into position in front of the works of the enemy on his right. On the night succeeding that day he evacuated his works, and on the 5th the brigade moved to the north
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 79 (search)
next day we took up our line of march in the direction of Acworth Station, where we bivouacked and remained until the morning of June 10, when we marched toward Marietta. Our movements from this to the 21st instant were very slow, the advance being made by parallels, driving the enemy from one position to another, line upon linee a good position some half a mile to the front. Two men mortally and 4 severely wounded were the casualties in my command in this movement. We remained before Marietta performing the usual duties, confronting a vigilant enemy, making occasional demonstrations upon his lines until the 27th, when a general advance was attempted, . to the support of Newton's division. I had 1 man wounded in this movement. The morning of July 3 the enemy disappeared from our front; our troops occupied Marietta and we pushed forward toward the Chattahoochee River, reaching it at a point known as Pace's Ferry. About noon of the 5th instant the enemy offered a stubborn r
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 80 (search)
n in the annexed list. Nominal list omitted. In this position, alternating slightly from right to left, the command lay until the 6th day of June, having lost 1 man killed and I wounded on the skirmish line. The enemy having fallen back toward Marietta on the morning of the 5th, early on the morning of the 6th the command was moved to the left to within two and a half miles of Acworth. Here it lay until the morning of the 10th, when it moved about two miles to the front. From this time to thounded on June 26, and 1 killed and 1 wounded on the 29th of June on skirmish line. On the night of the 2d of July the enemy abandoned his position on Kenesaw Mountain. On the morning of the 3d we marched in pursuit, passing to the south of Marietta. Marched six miles and bivouacked for the night. On the 4th we moved to the left and front, skirmishing with the enemy; formed our line, and threw up works. In this affair the command lost 1 man killed, 2 wounded, and 2 taken prisoners. On th
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 81 (search)
t two miles, we again rested until the 14th. On the 15th the enemy again abandoned their position in our front, and again we started in pursuit. We were thus constantly pushing the foe, and they intrenching and evacuating until we arrived near Marietta, where they sheltered themselves behind their works upon and about Kenesaw Mountain, we, in the mean time, losing 3 men wounded, and taking 20 prisoners, while on the skirmish line. Before the enemy were compelled to abandon their last-mentioned stronghold, we lost 1 man killed, 1 officer and 12 men wounded. Sunday, July 3, the enemy disappeared from our front; we started in pursuit at 7 a. m., and camped four miles south of Marietta on railroad; moved into position and fortified. The next day the enemy abandoned their front line of works, and, being pushed, crossed the Chattahoochee River. We remained here until the 7th, when we changed position, moving a half mile to the right. On the 9th we advanced one mile. On the 10th we mo
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