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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bemis's Heights, battles of. (search)
nd wrote to Clinton that he could sustain his position until Oct. 12. But his condition rapidly grew worse. The American army hourly increased in numbers, and the militia were swarming on his flanks and rear. His foraging parties could get very little food for the starving horses, the militia so annoyed them. In his hospitals were 800 sick and wounded men, and his effective soldiers were fed on diminished rations. His Indian allies descrted him, while, through the exertions of Schuyler, Oneida warriors joined the forces of Gates. Lincoln, with 2,000 men, also joined him on the 22d; still Gates remained inactive. His officers were impatient, and Arnold plainly told him that the army was clamorous for action, and the militia were threatening to go home. He told him that he had reason to think that if they had improved the 20th of September it might have ruined the enemy. That is past, he said: let me entreat you to improve the present time. Gates was offended, and, treating the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mohegan, or Mohican, Indians, (search)
ish, but were soon reduced to 200 warriors, and the Connecticut Mohegans to about 150. Some of the latter were collected at Stockbridge, Mass.; and from 1740 to 1744 the Moravians had a flourishing mission among them at Shekomeco, in Dutchess county, N. Y. Some of these went to Pennsylvania under the care of the Moravians. In the Revolution they joined the Americans, and were found in the ranks at Bunker Hill, White Plains, and other fields. After the war some of the Mohegans emigrated to Oneida, under the Rev. Samson Occum, a native preacher, and others, and before 1830 they had emigrated to Green Bay, Wis., where they abandoned their tribal relations and became citizens. They have almost given up their own language for the English, and are nearly extinct. Those who remained in Connecticut took up their abode near Norwich, at a place known as Mohegan Plains, and also near the village of Kent, in western Connecticut. At the latter place they have intermingled with other races, un
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Navy of the United States (search)
3644Ordinary. Constellation3644Ordinary. Congress3644Ordinary. Boston32Ordinary. Essex32Capt. Porter. Adams32Ordinary. John Adams26Capt. Ludlow. Wasp1618Capt. Jones. Hornet1618Capt. Lawrence. Siren16Lieut. Carroll. Argus16Lieut. Crane. Oneida16Lieut. Woolsey. Vixen12Lieut. Gadsden. Nautilus12Lieut. Sinclair. Enterprise12Capt. Blakeley. Viper12Capt. Bainbridge. The government early perceived the importance of having control of Lakes Ontario and Erie when the war began. Events in t260S.b4 Belusan200GunboatI.220S... Aileen192Gunboat (converted)S.500S.b5 Elfridaa173Gunboat (converted)S.200S.b2 Sylph152Gunboat (converted)S.550S.b8 Calamianes150GunboatI.125T. S.b3 Albay150GunboatI.125T. S.b3 Leyte150GunboatI.125T. S.b3 Oneida150Gunboat (converted)W.350S.b6 Panay142GunboatI.125T. S.b4 Manileno142GunboatI.125T. S.b4 Mariveles142GunboatI.125T. S.b4 Mindoro142GunboatI.125T. S.b4 Restless137Gunboat (converted)I.500S.b8 Shearwater122Gunboat (converted)S......S.b3 Inc
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Noyes, John Humphrey 1811-1886 (search)
d a second conversion. Hefounded a new sect called Perfectionists in Putnam county, Vt. After twelve years he imbibed some of the teachings of Fourier and persuaded his disciples to live in communities. In 1848 he went with his followers to Oneida, N. Y., where he established the Oneida Community. He taught that God had a dual body— male and female. The only successful communities, those founded at Oneida, N. Y., and Wallingford, Conn., adopted what was named complex marriage, and lived in Oneida, N. Y., where he established the Oneida Community. He taught that God had a dual body— male and female. The only successful communities, those founded at Oneida, N. Y., and Wallingford, Conn., adopted what was named complex marriage, and lived in a unity house. Subsequently they were compelled to abandon complex marriage and their number soon diminished. Noyes published The second coming of Christ; History of American socialism, etc. He died in Niagara Falls, Canada, April 13, 1
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Oneida, the (search)
Oneida, the The first warlike measure of the Americans previous to the hostilities begun in 1812 was the construction, at Sackett's Harbor, N. Y., of the brig Oneida, 16 guns, by Christian Berg and Henry Eckford. She was launched in 1809, and was intended for a twofold purpose—to enforce the revenue laws under the embargo act, and to be in readiness to defend American property afloat on Lake Ontario in case of war with Great Britain. Her first duty in that line was performed in 1812, when she was commanded by Lieut. Melancthon T. Woolsey. The schooner Lord Nelson, laden with flour and merchandise, and owned by British subjects at Niagara, was found in American waters in May, 1812, on her way to Kingston, and was captured by the Oneida and condemned as lawful prize. About a month later (June 14) another British schooner, the Ontario, was captured at St. Vincent, but was soon discharged. At about the same time still another offending schooner, the Niagara, was seized and sold
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Oneida community. (search)
Oneida community. See Noyes, John Humphreys.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Socialism, (search)
Phalanx, organ of FourierismOct. 5, 1843 Convention of Associationists at Clinton Hall, N. Y.April 4, 1844 Brook farm, established in 1842, adopts the principles of Fourierism1844 The Phalanx succeeded by the Harbinger, and published at Brook FarmJune 14, 1845 Erick Janson forms a Swedish colony of Pietists and Separatists at Bishop Hill, Ill. (incorporated in 1853)1846 Decline of Fourierism in the United States marked by the Greeley-Raymond controversy,Nov. 20, 1846, to May 20, 1847 Oneida community established1847 Christian socialism, under Kingsley, Maurice, Hughes, etc., arises in England about1850 Ferdinand Lassalle founds the German Social Democratic party1862 Universal German Laborers' Union, under the leadership of Lassalle, formed at LeipsicMay 23, 1863 Delegates of all nations in St. Martin's Hall, London, form the International Workingmen's AssociationSept. 28, 1864 Band of disciples of Lassalle organized in New York1865 Universal congress, for advancement a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stanwix, John 1690- (search)
Stanwix, John 1690- Military officer; born in England, about 1690; came to America, in 1756, as commandant of the first battalion of the 60th, or Royal Americans. He was commander of the Southern District, with his headquarters at Carlisle, Pa., in 1757. In December he was promoted to brigadier-general. On being relieved by Forbes, he proceeded to Albany, and was directed to build a fort at the Oneida carrying-place, on the Mohawk. He returned to Pennsylvania, a majorgeneral, in 1759, strengthened Fort Pitt, and secured the good — will of the Indians. In May, 1760, he resigned his commission to Monckton, and, on his return to England, was appointed lieutenant-governor of the Isle of Wight, and afterwards promoted to lieutenant-general. He also became a member of Parliament. He had served with reputation in the wars of Queen Anne before coming to America, having entered the army in 1706. General Stanwix was lost at sea while crossing from Dublin to Holyhead in December, 1765
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stuart, Charles 1783- (search)
Stuart, Charles 1783- Author; born in Jamaica, W. I., about 1783; entered the British army as lieutenant in 1801; served in Madras in 1801-14; was promoted captain. He came to the United States about 1822, and spent several years in Utica, N. Y., where he became a strong abolitionist. He was the author of Immediate emancipation would be safe and profitable; Memoirs of Granville sharp; Oneida and Oberlin; The extirpation of slavery in the United States, etc. He died near Lake Simcoe, Canada, in 1865.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, (search)
strikes a rock near Athens; many passengers drowned......April 7, 1845 Gov. Silas Wright proclaims Delaware county in a state of insurrection on account of anti-rentism......Aug. 27, 1845 Madison University, at Hamilton, Madison county, chartered......May 26, 1846 [Hamilton Literary and Theological Seminary, at the same place, established in 1819, is included in this charter.] State constitution revised and adopted......November, 1846 John Young, governor......Jan. 1, 1847 Oneida community established......1847 Meeting at Seneca Falls to advocate political equality of women......1848 Hamilton Fish elected governor by the Whigs......1848 Spirit rappings, phenomena begun in the house of John D. Fox, Hydersville, and afterwards in Rochester......1848 Continuous railroad, Boston to New York, opened......Jan. 1, 1849 Population of the State, 3,097,394......1850 University of Rochester, at Rochester, chartered......May 8, 1850 Arctic expedition in sear
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