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les. K. & M. W. battles. K. & M. W. Roanoke Island, N. C. 13 Spotsylvania, Va., May 18 1 New to C. Maggi, it was prominently engaged at Roanoke Island, where its casualties were 5 killed and 39les. K. & M. W. battles. K. & M. W. Roanoke Island, N. C. 11 Drewry's Bluff, Va. 21 New Berneles. K. & M. W. battles. K. & M. W. Roanoke Island, N. C. 5 Drewry's Bluff, Va. 22 New Berne,1st) Brigade, and fought under Burnside at Roanoke Island and New Berne, its casualties in the latteles. K. & M. W. battles. K. & M. W. Roanoke Island, N. C. 12 Petersburg, Va. 3 New Berne, N. Foster's (1st) Brigade, and was engaged at Roanoke Island, its casualties in that action amounting t 2 Place Unknown 3 Present, also, at Roanoke Island; South Mountain; Fredericksburg; Petersburg. Includes the captured. Total. Roanoke Island, N. C. 3 11 9 23 New Berne, N. C. 11 60   ia, Va. 23     Present, also, at Roanoke Island, N. C.; Chantilly, Va.; Vicksburg, Miss.; Cam[1 more...]
. The Second Jersey Brigade was composed originally of the 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th Regiments, to which the 11th was subsequently added. Other regiments were attached to the brigade at different times. The Ninth New Jersey was a regiment which reflected credit on its State, and made a brilliant reputation in the Department in which it served. It fought in the battles along the North Carolina coast, and in 1864 was attached to the Army of the James. Its principal losses occurred at Roanoke Island, New Berne, Port Walthall, Drewry's Bluff, Cold Harbor, and Petersburg. The Thirteenth New Jersey is noteworthy on account of the remarkably small number cf deaths from disease which occurred within its ranks. The regiments which marched by its side sustained far greater losses from this cause. And the Thirteenth saw an unusual amount of active service, too. It had not left the State two weeks before it joined McClellan's Army on the Maryland campaign, and was hotly engaged at Antie
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 13: aggregate of deaths in the Union Armies by States--total enlistment by States--percentages of military population furnished, and percentages of loss — strength of the Army at various dates casualties in the Navy. (search)
m incidental to the Civil War, the Navy played no secondary part. Losses in the United States Navy, 1861-65. Date. Vessel. Commander. Battle. Killed. Wounded. Missing. Aggregate. 1861               Sept. 14 Colorado Russell Pensacola 3 9 -- 12 Nov. 7 Fleet Dupont Port Royal 8 23 -- 31 Nov. 7 Tyler Walke Belmont 1 2 -- 3 1862               Feb. 2 Essex Porter (W. D.) Fort Henry 7 20 5 32 Feb. 2 Cincinnati Stembel Fort Henry 1 7 -- 8 Feb. 8 Fleet Goldsborough Roanoke Island 6 17 -- 23 Feb. 15 St. Louis Paulding Fort Donelson 2 8 -- 10 Feb. 15 Louisville Dove Fort Donelson 4 5 -- 9 Feb. 15 Pittsburg Thompson Fort Donelson -- 2 -- 2 Feb. 15 Carondelet Walke Fort Donelson 4 31 -- 35 Mch. 8 Cumberland Morris Hampton Roads -- -- -- 121 Mch. 8 Congress Smith Hampton Roads -- -- -- 129 Mch. 14 Fleet Rowan New Berne 2 11 -- 13 April 24 Fleet Farragut New Orleans 37 147 -- 184 April 24 Iroquois Included, also, in the loss of t
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 14: the greatest battles of the war — list of victories and defeats — chronological list of battles with loss in each, Union and Confederate. (search)
Tenn. Iuka, Miss. Stone's River, Tenn. Shiloh, Tenn. Corinth, Miss. Missionary Ridge, Tenn. Pea Ridge, Ark. Chaplin Hills, Ky. Fort Stevens, D. C. Roanoke Island, N. C. Resaca, Ga. Opequon, Va. New Berne, N. C. Atlanta, Ga., July 21-22. Cedar Creek, Va. Carter's Farm, Va. Piedmont, Va. Five Forks, Va. Prairie Grov Dec. 13 Camp Alleghany, W. Va 20 107 10 137 Dec. 20 Dranesville, Va 7 61 -- 68 1862.             Jan. 19 Mill Springs, Ky 39 207 -- 246 Feb. 8 Roanoke Island, N. C 37 214 13 264 Feb. 15 Fort Donelson, Tenn 500 2,108 224 2,832 March 1-14 New Madrid, Mo 8 21 3 32 March 6-8 Pea Ridge, Mo 203 980 201 1,384 Dec. 13 Camp Alleghany, W. Va 20 96 28 144 Dec. 20 Dranesville, Va 43 143 8 194 1862.             Jan. 19 Mill Springs, Ky 125 309 95 529 Feb. 8 Roanoke Island, N. C 23 58 2,527 2,608 Feb. 14-16 Fort Donelson, Tenn Gen. Pillow's Report: Official Records, Vol. VII, p. 291.466 1,534 May include some of
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 15: Confederate losses — strength of the Confederate Armies--casualties in Confederate regiments — list of Confederate Generals killed — losses in the Confederate Navy. (search)
urg Fifth 116 12 45 2 50.8 88th New York Fredericksburg Second 252 17 97 13 50.3 1st Wisconsin Chaplin Hills Fourteenth 407 58 132 14 50.1 87th Indiana Chickamauga Fourteenth 380 40 142 8 50.0 69th Pennsylvania Gettysburg Second 258 40 80 9 50.0 73d New York Gettysburg Third 324 51 103 8 50.0 To the tables (pp. 426-461) showing regiments which sustained the greatest losses in each battle, add: Regiment. Division. Corps. Killed. Wounded. Missing. Aggregate. Roanoke Island, N. C.             Feb. 8, 1862.             10th Connecticut Burnside's Ninth 6 49   55 Bachelor's Creek, N. C.             Feb. 1, 1864.             132d New York ---------- --------- 5 6 80 91 Meridian Raid, Miss.             Feb. 3--March 5, 1864.             47th U. S. Colored (8th La.) ---------- --------- 11 66 2 79 11th Illinois ---------- --------- 10 40 16 66 7th Indiana Cavalry ---------- --------- 11 37 36 84 Cloyd
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 9 (search)
while the legs kept up their claim of eccentricity by encasing themselves in grey blankets, tied somewhat in a bandit fashion. The whole made up no less a person than Henry A. Wise, once Governor of the loyal state of Virginia, now Brigadier-General and prisoner of war. By his first wife he is Meade's brother-in-law, and had been sent for to see him. I think he is punished already enough: old, sick, impoverished, a prisoner, with nothing to live for, not even his son, who was killed at Roanoke Island, he stood there in his old, wet, grey blanket, glad to accept at our hands a pittance of biscuit and coffee, to save him and his Staff from starvation! While they too talked, I asked General Lee after his son Roonie, He was at Harvard with Lyman. who was about there somewhere. It was the Last ditch indeed! He too is punished enough: living at this moment at Richmond, on the food doled out to him by our government, he gets his ration just like the poorest negro in the place! We le
t was not until half past 3 o'clock that any movement was made by the troops on shore to remove the cargo of the Fanny. I had but two boats, while they had a large lighter and a number of canoes, with which the cargo could have readily been removed in a short time. Finally the commanding officer of the Indiana regiment came off in a canoe with a lighter and took off a cargo of goods for immediate use. About half past 4 o'clock I saw the rebel side-wheel steamer Northampton heading from Roanoke Island directly toward us; shortly after I saw two smaller boats, propellers, one heading to cut off our retreat and the other so as to get ahead of us. The side-wheel steamer was about two hundred and fifty tons' burden and had two thirty-twos forward. The other vessels were about one hundred and twenty tons, and each armed with one twenty-four-pounder cannon, capable of throwing a sixty-four-pound shot. The powder I had on freight was stored in a house on deck, forward of the boiler, and
y the Susquehanna, as she is about leaving for Hampton Roads to coal. Norfolk day Book account: Captain Carrsville, of the Craville Guards, Third Georgia regiment, gives us the following statement: Colonel Wright left Camp Georgia, Roanoke Island, on Thursday, midnight, and arrived at Chicamacomico on Friday, October 4th. Col. Wright made the attack on the Federals at nine o'clock in the morning, by firing shell from two ten-pound howitzers from on board the transport Cotton Plant, wh, consisting of three hundred tents, carriage boxes, haversacks, canteens, cooking utensils, provisions, etc., together with their private wardrobe, which they were in too great haste to take with them. The entire expedition then returned to Roanoke Island, where they arrived on Sunday night at twelve o'clock. The Day Book gives the following particulars: The Twentieth Indiana regiment was drawn up on shore, preparatory to giving our forces battle, probably to frighten them off; but seein
irons with a masterly skill, taking their time in each case. It has been reported, though with what truth we are unable to say, that the Sea Bird struck the Express and set her on fire, and that she was afterward put out without injury.--Norfolk Day Book, Dec. 30. Commodore Lynch's report. The following is an extract from the report of Capt. Lynch to the Navy Department: The water being too low in the Chesapeake and Albemarle Canal for this vessel (the Sea Bird) to proceed to Roanoke Island, we last evening steamed down and anchored in the bight of Craney Island. This morning, a little before daylight, we weighed anchor and stood across to Newport News. About half past 7 A. M. an enemy's steamer passed out of James River, with a schooner in tow, and steered for Fortress Monroe. We immediately gave chase, when she cut the schooner adrift, and carried a heavy head of steam, in order to get under the cover of numerous men-of-war lying off the fortress. We were fast closing
Gens. Burnside, Foster, Reno, Parke, and Williams, the result of which is preparation for an advance, probably toward Roanoke Island, on which the rebels are known to be encamped in considerable force, and the possession of which is desirable, as it t flood. It forms a barrier against the sea from the sound, hence its name. On Saturday we move in the direction of Roanoke Island, where the rebels are believed to be five thousand strong. Our picket-boats report having seen four or five secessiond herbs, after which they succeeded in stealing a boat, in which they descended Roanoke Sound on the eastern side of Roanoke Island. As they passed the island they were hailed by the sentinels, and, pretending to stop rowing, allowed their boat to ves on the mainland across Croatan Sound, where they have erected masked batteries. A knowledge of the position of Roanoke Island, and the sands on both sides, would indicate some truth in this last report. From past experience the North-Carolini
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