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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Index, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 1 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 1 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 1 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 1 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Marion, Francis (search)
Marion, Francis Military officer; born near Georgetown, S. C., in 1732; died Feb. 29, 1793. At the age of sixteen, while on a voyage to the West Indies, the vessel in which he sailed foundered at sea, and he was rescued only when several of the crew, who, with himself, had taken to the boat, had died of starvation. Working on a farm until 1759, that year he joined an expedition against the Cherokees. In 1761 he was made a captain, under Colonel Grant. He led the forlorn hope in the battle of Etchowee, and was among the few who escaped death. On the breaking out of the Revolutionary War, Marion was elected to the South Carolina Provincial Congress; became a captain of Provincial troops; served as major in defence of Fort Sullivan; and was lieutenant-colonel of his regiment at Savannah in 1779, and at the siege of Charleston. Appointed a brigadier-general in 1780, Francis Marion. he began his famous partisan career with only sixteen men. He had gathered many partisans to
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Peabody, George 1795-1869 (search)
Peabody, George 1795-1869 Philanthropist; born at Danvers, Mass., Feb. 18, 1795. After serving as a clerk in his uncle's store in Georgetown, D. C., in 1812-13, he became a partner with Elisha Riggs, in New York City, and afterwards in Baltimore. In July, 1843, he became a banker, in London, and amassed an immense fortune, which he used in making princely benefactions, as follows: To his native town, $200,000, to establish a lyceum and library; to the first Grinnell expedition in search of Sir John Franklin, $10,000; to found an institute of science, literature, and the fine arts, in Baltimore, $1,400,000; and, in 1862, to the city of London, $2,500,000, for the benefit of its poor, for which the Queen gave him her portrait, the city its freedom, and the citizens erected a statue of him. In 1866 he gave to Harvard University $150,000 to establish a museum and professorship of American archaeology and ethnology, and, the same year, to the Southern Educational Fund, just created,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Smyth, Alexander (search)
e—settled by the seconds. General Porter acknowledged that he considered Smyth a man of courage, and Smyth declared Porter to be above suspicion as a gentleman and an officer. So ended the melodrama of Smyth's invasion of Canada. General Smyth was removed from the army without trial. He afterwards petitioned Congress to reinstate him, declaring in his memorial that he asked the privilege of dying for his country. The phrase was ridiculed by his enemies. At a public celebration at Georgetown, D. C., on Washington's birthday in 1814, the following toast was offered: General Smyth's petition to Congress to die for his country — May it be ordered that the prayer of said petitioner be granted. A wag wrote on the panel of the door of the House of Representatives: All hail, great chief! who quailed before A Bisshopp on Niagara's shore; But looks on Death with dauntless eye, And begs for leave to bleed and die. O my! Concerning his pompous proclamations and his signal failure
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Underwood, John Cox 1840- (search)
Underwood, John Cox 1840- Engineer; born in Georgetown, D. C., Sept. 12, 1840; graduated at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1862; served in the Confederate army as military engineer in Virginia, but was taken prisoner in 1863 and confined in Fort Warren till the close of the war. He was mayor of Bowling Green, Ky., in 1870-72; city, county, and (consulting) State engineer in 1866-75; lieutenant-governor of Kentucky in 1875-79; major-general of the United Confederate Veterans in 1891-95; and superintendent and secretary of the Confederate Memorial Association in 1896. He published various documents; established the Kentucky Intelligencer; organized a publishing company in Cincinnati, O., in 1881; and issued the Daily Yews, of which he was managing editor.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Washington, Lewis William 1825-1871 (search)
Washington, Lewis William 1825-1871 Planter; born in Georgetown, D. C., about 1825; son of George C. Washington; received a good education; settled in Jefferson county, Va., and became a planter. He was conspicuously connected with John Brown's raid on Harper's Ferry in 1859, where he was captured by Brown and held as a hostage. During the Civil War his property was confiscated, but later was released by the government. He had a valuable collection of George Washington's relics, including the sword that was sent to him by Frederick the Great. He died at Harper's Ferry, W. Va., Oct. 1, 1871.
in the United States, 1836. It has a Herschelian reflector of ten feet focus, mounted equatorially; also a transit instrument and compensation-clock. The Hudson Observatory of the Western Reserve College, Ohio, was built and furnished in 1838, having an equatorial, transit, and clock. The High School Observatory of Philadelphia was furnished in 1840. The West Point Observatory about 1841. The Tuscaloosa Observatory in 1843. The Washington Observatory about 1844. The Georgetown, D. C., Observatory in 1844. The Cincinnati Observatory in 1845. The Cambridge Observatory in 1847. The Amherst Observatory in 1847. Dartmouth, Newark, Shelbyville, Ky., Buffalo, Michigan University, Albany, and Hamilton College, have also observatories. A good article on the astronomical observatories of the United States may be found in Harper's Magazine, June, 1856. See also Observations at the Washington Observatory, volume for 1845. For more full details than in the ar
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, United States Veteran Reserve Corps. (search)
t 5, 1865. 142nd United States Veteran Reserve Company, 2nd Battalion Organized at New Orleans, La., February 9, 1864. Mustered out by detachments August 8 to November 30, 1865. 143rd United States Veteran Reserve Company, 2nd Battalion Organized at West's Building, Gen. Hospital, Baltimore, Md., February 29, 1864. Mustered out by detachments August 1 to November 20, 1865. 144th United States Veteran Reserve Company, 2nd Battalion Organized at Seminary Hospital, Georgetown, D. C., February 22, 1864. Consolidated with 49th Company, 2nd Battalion, July 19, 1865. 145th United States Veteran Reserve Company, 2nd Battalion Organized at David's Island, N. Y. Harbor, February 22, 1864. Consolidated with 4th Company, 2nd Battalion, September 18, 1865. 146th United States Veteran Reserve Company, 2nd Battalion Organized at Camp Randall, Madison, Wis., January 9, 1864. Mustered out by detachments August 19 to October 31, 1865. 147th United States
of Universal Emancipation, founded in Ohio by B. Lundy, 1.88, removed to Tennessee, 89, to Baltimore, 90; joined by G., 140; enlarged, 141; declining support, 162; suspended as weekly, 171; proposed renewal, 191; renewed as monthly, 175. Georgetown, D. C., penalty for taking Lib., 1: 240. Georgia, modifies first draft of Declaration of Independence, 1.167; refuses State aid to colonization, 148; dispossesses the Cherokees, 156, 182, 233, 270; alarm at Walker's Appeal, 160; law excluding ftion and material progress, 430, first number, 219, publication office, 220; first pictorial heading, 231, 270, second, 2.208; effect on free colored people, 1.234, 255; welcomed in England, 327, characterized by G., 335, 458, proscribed in Georgetown, D. C., and Columbia, S. C., 240; prompts a message by Governor Hamilton of S. C., and appeal by Savannah authorities to Boston, 241; reward offered by Georgia for editor or publisher, 247; office a rendezvous, 273; enlargement, Ladies' Department
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 8: the Liberator1831. (search)
ax of Southern mendacity and folly. My contempt of it is unutterable. Nothing but my own death, or a want of patronage, shall stop the Liberator. When the Southern papers call him hostis humani generis, a fiendish editor, the apologist of the blacks in the recent Virginia insurrection, he replies: Although I preach submission to Lib. 1.166. the slaves, still I am denounced as a monster. Do the planters wish me to inculcate a revengeful doctrine? In October the corporation of Georgetown, D. C., passed Lib. 1.171. a law prohibiting any free person of color from taking the Liberator from the post-office, under pain of twenty dollars' fine or thirty days imprisonment; and if fine and jail fees were not paid, directing such person to be sold as a slave for four months. It was one of the functions of the Liberator to remind them that this law was unconstitutional, and that they must be prepared to answer for their conduct before the Supreme Court of the United States. The Cha
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
le and engaged the attention of the leading statesmen. Of these only a very few were pre-eminent as economic thinkers. Jefferson never pretended to grasp economic problems, his only contributions to the subject being found in his Notes on Virginia (786), which disclose a striking incapacity to foretell the future industrial development of the country. Many years later Jefferson, as he tells us himself, carefully revised and corrected Destutt Tracy's A treatise on political economy (Georgetown, D. C., 1817), which was translated from the unpublished French original. There is, however, no evidence that Jefferson profited from its perusal. On the other hand, Hamilton showed in his great state papers and notably in his two Reports on public credit (1790, 1795), as well as in his Report on manufactures (1791), that he possessed a remarkable acquaintance with economic principles as then understood. There is in fact no statesman of the eighteenth century, with the exception of Turgot,
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