hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 606 results in 171 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...
eparate roads, which precluded their reciprocal support, but advanced slowly — Hamilton's division in front — up to a point two miles from Iuka, where a cross-road cod Col. J. B. Sanborn, who had bravely and skillfully directed the movements of Hamilton's two brigades; but not a regiment of Stanley's division, save the 11th Missouour inner intrenchments, and ordered to close with his right on Davies's left; Hamilton's division was moved down until its left touched Davies's right; while Stanleyound the wings. The 56th yells again and pursues. The Rebels do not stop. Hamilton's veterans, meantime, have been working quietly — no lung-work, but gun-work ehis is one of the apocrypha of battle. A Rebel soldier says it s truth. But Hamilton's division receded under orders — at backward step; slowly, grimly, face to thcenter, Davies's division gave way, but speedily rallied, and, with the aid of Hamilton's division and a cross-fire from battery Robinett, poured in a fire so destru
he slaughter-pen with equal stupidity. Had our line been formed half a mile back from the enemy's, and there simply held while our gunners shelled the woods, we might not have achieved a brilliant success, but we could not have been beaten; but Hamilton's battery went into action, under a heavy fire of musketry, barely 150 yards from the Rebel front, and in 20 minutes had lost 40 out of 50 horses and 45 out of 82 men — when what was left of it recoiled; leaving 2 of its 4 guns where its life-blConn. (infantry), Col. J. R. Hawley, were in the advance, and drew the first fire of the mainly concealed enemy. Hawley, finding his regiment falling under a concentric fire, ordered up the 7th New Hampshire, shire, Col. Abbott, to its support; Hamilton's, Elder's, and Langdon's batteries also coming into action. The 7th N. H. was a tried and trusty regiment; but it had been lately deprived of its beloved Spencer repeating rifles, and armed instead with Springfield muskets which it pronounced
is communications with Gen. McClellan, ordering him to withdraw his army from the Peninsula, 190-1-2; his order relating to fugitive slaves. 241; orders Burnside to concentrate his army on the Tennessee. 430; his apprehensions as to Rosecrans's army at Chattanooga. 432; Grant relieves him as Commander-in-Chief and appoints him chief of staff, 564. Hamilton, Gen. S., cooperates in the attack on Price at Iuka. 223; his report as to Corinth, 225; with Sherman on his great march, 639. Hamilton's battery, at Olustee, 531. Hampton roads, gunboat fight in, 116 to 120. Hampton, Gen. Wade, wounded at Gettysburg, 389; surprises Kilpatrick near Fayetteville, 705. Hancock, Gen. Winfield S., in battle of Williamsburg, 125; succeeds Gen. Richardson at Antietam, 208; at Fredericksburg. 345; at Gettysburg. 380 to 387; wounded, 387; commands 2d corps of tlie Army of the Potomac. 564; he marches on Chancellorsville. 566; at the Wilderness. 567 to 571; captures Gen. Johnson and sta
1+ 38th Ohio Jonesboro Baird's 360 72 20+ 41st Ohio Shiloh Nelson's 371 43 11+ 41st Ohio Pickett's Mills T. J. Wood's 271 40 14+ 49th Ohio Pickett's Mills T. J. Wood's 475 83 17+ 63d Ohio (9 Cos.) Corinth Stanley's 275 39 14+ 65th Ohio Stone's River T. J. Wood's 405 52 12+ 73d Ohio Manassas Schenck's 335 39 11+ 73d Ohio Gettysburg Steinwehr's 300 40 13+ 82d Ohio Gettysburg Schurz's 312 35 11+ 101st Ohio Stone's River Davis's 460 51 11+ 11th Ohio Battery Iuka Hamilton's 105 19 18+ 8th Penn. Reserves Fredericksburg Meade's 264 44 16+ 11th Penn. Reserves Fredericksburg Meade's 394 49 12+ 26th Pennsylvania Gettysburg Humphreys's 382 65 17+ 45th Pennsylvania Cold Harbor Potter's 315 41 13+ 46th Pennsylvania Cedar Mountain Williams's 504 55 10+ 49th Pennsylvania Spotsylvania Russell's 478 109 22+ 52d Pennsylvania Fair Oaks Casey's 249 29 11+ 53d Pennsylvania Fredericksburg Hancock's 283 39 14+ 56th Pennsylvania Gettysburg Wadsworth'
War. He commanded the regiment until June 18, 1862, when he died suddenly at Fort Pulaski. The Forty-eighth left Fort Hamilton, N. Y., on September 15, 1861, and after a brief stay in Washington and Annapolis sailed, October 21st, for Fort Monroe, here, September 18th, for Iuka, where it fought the next day under Rosecrans. It was then in Sanborn's (1st) Brigade of Hamilton's Division, and sustained the heaviest loss of any regiment in that battle, its casualties amounting to 37 killed, 179 ws expedition against New Madrid, Mo., and participated in the investment and capture of Island Number10. Its division — Hamilton's — then moved to Corinth, where it joined the besieging army, arriving there April 22, 1862. Although the regiment was later, under Lieutenant-Colonel Holman, it was engaged at the battle of Corinth; it was then in Buford's (1st) Brigade, Hamilton's (3d) Division, Army of the Mississippi. During the Vicksburg campaign it was in Boomer's (3d) Brigade, Crocker's Di
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 71.-fight at Middle-Fork Bridge, Va., July 6, 1861. (search)
ain himself animated them by his cheerful voice, which was heard above the din of the conflict. Dr. McMeans says the Captain was as calm and collected as if he were playing soldier. The casualties were as follows: Samuel W. Johns, of Hamilton, Butler County, shot dead by a ball through the breast; Corporal Joseph High, of Columbus, shot in the right foot by a rebel from the hill-side. The ball struck on the top of his ankle, and passed downwards, shattering the small bones of the foot. Theven or eight inches, ploughing up a ghastly furrow; the bone was not broken. David Edson, of Barnesville, Belmont County, slightly wounded in the right arm. Joseph Backus, of Newark, slightly wounded in the left leg. William Dening, of Hamilton, Butler County, had the skin above his right ear cut by a ball; seven or eight of the men received scratches, and had their clothing riddled. Captain Lawson says Mr. Miller, of Worthington, was the coolest and pluckiest fellow in the fight. He was th
pal magazine, I ordered a white flag to be shown, when the firing ceased, and the surrender was made upon the conditions of the accompanying articles of capitulation. The personnel of this command are now prisoners of war on board this ship, (the Minnesota,) where every thing is done to make them as comfortable as possible under the circumstances; Flag-officer Stringham, Captain Van Brunt, and Commander Case extending to us characteristic courtesy and kindness. We are to be landed at Fort Hamilton, New York harbor. So far as ascertained, there were this day two killed, twenty-five or thirty wounded, and many others slightly wounded. Boston Journal's account. Hatteras Inlet, August 30. When General Wool arrived at Fortress Monroe, he found that preparations had already been made for an expedition to North Carolina, the object whereof was to stop one of the many breaks which the imperfect means at the command of the blockading squadron had left in the cordon which h
es, and I called a council of officers, at which it was unanimously agreed that holding out longer could only result in a greater loss of life, without the ability to damage our adversaries, and, just at this time, the magazine being reported on fire, a shell having fallen through the ventilator of the bomb-proof into the room adjoining the principal magazine, I ordered a white flag to be shown, when the firing ceased, and the surrender was made upon the conditions of the accompanying articles of capitulation. The personnel of this command are now prisoners of war on board this ship, (the Minnesota,) where every thing is done to make them as comfortable as possible under the circumstances; Flag-officer Stringham, Captain Van Brunt, and Commander Case extending to us characteristic courtesy and kindness. We are to be landed at Fort Hamilton, New York harbor. So far as ascertained, there were this day two killed, twenty-five or thirty wounded, and many others slightly wounded.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 36. battle of Port Royal, S. C. Fought November 7, 1861. (search)
s of transportation may take the remainder of a brigade, with probably one or two sections of field-artillery. 4. The disembarkment will be made in three lines. The first line will be the brigade of General Wright, flanked by two sections of Hamilton's light battery, accompanied by the squad of regular sappers and miners, and two companies of Serrell's Volunteer Engineers, with a sufficient supply of intrenching tools and sandbags. The second line will be the brigade of General Stevens, and, if necessary, accompanied by a section of Hamilton's battery and two field-pieces, to be manned by a company of the Third Rhode Island regiment. The reserve will be composed of General Viele's brigade, the remaining portions of Serrell's Volunteer Engineers and the Third Rhode Island regiment, and will be disposed of according to circum-stances. 5. The boats of not only each company, but of each regiment and brigade, will land abreast, as far as practicable, and in the order of battle. Th
five steamboats, landed six or eight miles above us on the Missouri shore, and were seen to disembark infantry, artillery, and cavalry in large numbers. Troops were thrown across from our side of the river about eight or nine o'clock, and about eleven o'clock the battle commenced and raged till three or four o'clock P. M. The gunboats came down within range of our camp and commenced throwing shot and shell about eight o'clock. One or two shots fell inside our line--one piece near my tent. Hamilton's artillery replied to the boats, and they soon moved out of range, when Captain Stewart, with his Parrott guns, went two miles up the bluff and opened on the boats. Most of his guns threw over the boats, and the enemy's balls did not reach us. Adjutant Hammond and I were with Captain Stewart, and helped the men to place the guns in position a number of times. They were just going to fire one of the guns, when Hammond and I retired some ten or twelve yards. The gun was fired — the explosi
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...