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ee companies, at first an independent battalion, were afterwards consolidated with the 41st Mass. Infantry and became the 3d Mass. Cavalry (Colonel Chickering). Of these, the 2d Mass. Battery was detained at sea and did not actually arrive until May 21. The expectation was that this land force might be employed to take the forts that commanded the river, should the navy fail to reduce them. As a matter of fact the navy accomplished it; but Major Whittemore of the 30th Mass. occupied Fort St. Philip when surrendered, while Captain Manning, with the 4th Mass. Battery, occupied Fort Jackson. Both forts were afterward held by the 26th Mass. (Colonel Jones). On arrival at New Orleans, May 1, the 31st Mass., with a section of the 6th Mass. Battery, were among the troops that took possession of the city. The 6th Mass. Battery took part in the occupation of Baton Rouge, and when General Williams left that town on June 20, in the unavailing hope of taking Vicksburg, the 30th Mass. form
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments., Twenty-sixth regiment Massachusetts Infantry. (search)
ventful three months service. Going into camp at Cambridge, Mass., August 28, as the 6th Mass. Infantry, it moved September 23 to Camp Chase, Lowell, where it completed its organization as the 26th Mass. Infantry, being mustered into service during September and October, 1861. The regiment was sent to Ship Island, Miss., and, arriving December 3, remained in camp until the spring of 1862. In the operations against New Orleans it formed part of the force moving to Quarantine, occupied Forts St. Philip and Jackson after their evacuation by the enemy, and, stationed at New Orleans itself early in July, remained on provost duty until June, 1863. A detachment of the regiment under Captain Pickering formed part of an expedition across Lake Pontchartrain in September, 1862. On the formation of the 19th Army Corps, under General Banks, the regiment became part of the 2d Brigade, 2d Division, with Colonel Farr as brigade commander. Still forming part of the force occupying New Orleans, se
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments., Thirtieth regiment Massachusetts Infantry. (search)
remained at Fortress Monroe until February 2, and being assigned to the Department of the Gulf, it reached Ship Island, Miss., February 12. Company K joined the regiment March 9, and the organization was completed during the month as the 30th Mass. Infantry, Capt. Nathan A. M. Dudley, of the 10th U. S. Infantry, having been appointed colonel March 1. As part of General Phelps's force it shared in the operations against New Orleans in April, a detachment under Major Whittemore occupying Fort St. Philip immediately after its surrender. Stationed at Baton Rouge, it engaged as part of General Williams's Brigade in the movement against Vicksburg, and, returning, took active part at the battle of Baton Rouge August 5, under command of Major Whittemore. Leaving Baton Rouge August 21, it encamped in the vicinity of Carrollton until November 3, moving then to New Orleans. In January, 1863, the regiment was assigned to the 3d Brigade (commanded by Colonel Dudley), 1st Division, 19th Army Co
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died., Index of Battles, etc., Mentioned in Preliminary Narrative. (search)
8, 1865), 130. Fisher's Hill, Va. (Sept. 21-22, 1864), 111. Fitzhugh's Crossing, Va. (April 29-30, 1863), 95. Five Forks, Va. (April 1, 1865), 129. Fort Anderson, N. C. (May 14, 1862), 49. Fort Bisland, La., see Bisland. Fort Blakeley, Va. (April 2-9, 1865), 129. Fort Fisher, N. C. (Dec. 25, 1864), 130. Fort Jackson, La., 56. Fort Macallister, Ga. (March 3, 1863), 43. Fort Mahone, Va. (April 2, 1865), 129. Fort Pillow, Tenn. (May 10-June 4, 1862), 42. Fort St. Philip, La., 56. Fort Stedman, Va. (March 25, 1865), 128. Fort Wagner, S. C. (July 18, 1863), 85; (Aug. 26, 1863), 87. Franklin, La. (July 9, 1863), 66. Fredericksburg, Va. (Dec. 11, 1862), 76. Front Royal, Va. (May 23-25, 1862), 108. Gaines' Mill, Va. (June 27-28, 1862), 53. Galveston, Tex. (Jan. 1, 1863), 60. Gettysburg, Pa. (July 1-3, 1863), 99. Glendale, Va. (June 30, 1862), 54. Goldsboroa, N. C. (Dec. 17, 1862), 48. Gov. Moore's Plantation, La. (May 1, 1864),
Infantry, Mar. 3, 1855; accepted, Mar. 23, 1855. Captain, May 7, 1861. On provost duty, Washington, D. C., Oct., 1861, to Feb , 1862. Colonel, 30th Mass. Infantry, Mar. 1, 1862. Commanding brigade during the bombardment of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and in the occupation of New Orleans, La. Military commander of city, May to June, 1862. Commanding a brigade in an expedition to Vicksburg, Miss., and with batteries of regiment, engaged during the passage of Farragut's fleet at Vicksburg, M Infantry, M. V. M., in service of the U. S., Apr. 22, 1861. Mustered out, Aug. 22, 1861. Colonel, 26th Mass. Infantry, Aug. 28, 1861. On duty at Ship Island till the operations against New Orleans in Apr., 1862. Engaged in the attack on Forts St. Philip and Jackson and afterward placed in immediate command of the Forts. Resigned, July 27, 1862. Brevet Brig. General, U. S. Volunteers, Mar. 13, 1865. Keyes, Erasmus Darwin. Born at Brimfield, Mass., May 29, 1810. Cadet, U. S. Military
O. 84, Oct. 14, 1868. Clarke, Captain H. C., Aide-de-Camp, U. S. Volunteers, to be Major, U. S. Volunteers, by brevet, for meritorious services in the Department of the Gulf, and for gallant conduct in the bombardment of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, on the Mississippi River, and in the attack by the enemy on Battery Harrison, Va., to date from Mar. 13, 1865. G. O. 148, Oct. 14, 1865. G. O. 65, June 22, 1867. — Brevet Major H. C., Captain, Aide-de-Camp, U. S. Volunteers, to be Lieut. Colonel, U. S. Volunteers, by brevet, for meritorious services in the Department of the Gulf, and for gallant conduct in the bombardment of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, on the Mississippi River, and in the attack by the enemy on Battery Harrison, Va., to date from Mar. 13, 1865. G. O. 148, Oct. 14, 1865. G. O. 65, June 22, 1867. Clarke, Captain Thomas W., of the 29th Mass. Volunteers, to be Major, U. S. Volunteers, by brevet, for gallant and meritorious services throughout the war, to d
g the Mississippi, illus. Forts Jackson and St. Philip; early operations about Vicksburg. Harper'sons of ships on passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, 1862; with diagrams. Army and Navy JournalService Mag., new ser., vol. 2, p. 37. Fort St. Philip. See Forts Jackson and St. Philip. St. Philip. Fort Sumter, S. C. 1861. March 20. Rumor that it had been mined and blown up; short paragraph. coast survey. Surrender of forts Jackson and St. Philip; with list of vessels engaged, and other sta with account of taking of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and of early occupation of New Orleans, in ncidents of the passing of Forts Jackson and St. Philip. Com. Geo. M. Ransom. United Service Mag., r. Opening the; illus. Forts Jackson and St. Philip, early operations about Vicksburg. J. S. C. vol. 2, pp. 347, 348. —Forts Jackson and St. Philip, La. First rumors of success. Boston Eveninncidents of the passing of Forts Jackson and St. Philip; the Kineo. United Service Mag , vol. 2, p.[4 more...]
mean to stay away from the polls. My sympathies, however, are with the Bell and Everett ticket. After all these preliminaries, we now proceed to a different side of the picture presented by the General. In the same Views (the 29th October, 1860), he says that, From a knowledge of our Southern population it is my solemn conviction that there is some danger of an early act of rashness preliminary to secession, viz., the seizure of some or all of the following posts:—Forts Jackson and St. Philip, in the Mississippi, below New Orleans, both without garrisons; Fort Morgan, below Mobile, without a garrison; Forts Pickens and McRea, Pensacola harbor, with an insufficient garrison for one; Fort Pulaski, below Savannah, without a garrison; Forts Moultrie and Sumter, Charleston harbor, the former with an insufficient garrison, and the latter without any; and Fort Monroe, Hampton Roads, without a sufficient garrison. In my opinion all these works should be immediately so garrisoned as to
r. Lincoln I have had no communication whatever, direct or indirect, and have no recollection of ever having seen his person; but cannot believe any unconstitutional violence, or breach of law, is to be apprehended from his administration of the Federal Government. From a knowledge of our Southern population it is my solemn conviction that there is some danger of an early act of rashness preliminary to secession, viz., the seizure of some or all of the following posts: Forts Jackson and St. Philip, in the Mississippi, below New Orleans, both without garrisons; Fort Morgan, below Mobile, without a garrison; Forts Pickens and McRee, Pensacola harbor, with an insufficient garrison for one; Fort Pulaski, below Savannah, without a garrison; Forts Moultrie and Sumter, Charleston harbor, the former with an insufficient garrison, and the latter without any; and Fort Monroe, Hampton Roads, without a sufficient garrison. In my opinion all these works should be immediately so garrisoned as to
ad formally withdrawn from the Union. Governor Brown, of Georgia, set the example in prompt action by seizing Fort pulaski and garrisoning it with State troops before his State had adopted an ordinance of secession. Governor Moore, of Alabama, seized the arsenal at Mount Vernon, and Forts Morgan and Gaines, which commanded the approach to Mobile. The governor of Florida seized the arsenal at Apalachicola, and Fort Marion at St. Augustine. The governor of Louisiana took possession of Fort St. Philip and Fort Jackson, which commanded the entrance to the Mississippi river, and seized the arsenal at Baton Rouge. President Buchanan officially informed Congress of these things, and declared that the country was in the midst of a great revolution. In Missouri there were two arsenals—one at Liberty, in Clay county, on the western border of the State, and the other in the southern suburb of St. Louis. The first was a small affair, of no great importance under any circumstances. The
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