Your search returned 1,256 results in 184 document sections:

... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 ...
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Boggs, Charles Stewart, 1811-1888 (search)
Boggs, Charles Stewart, 1811-1888 Naval officer; born in New Brunswick, N. J., Jan. 28, 1811; entered the navy in 1826; served on stations in the Mediterranean, West Indies, the coast of Africa, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Pacific Ocean. He was made lieutenant in 1837; promoted to commander in 1855; and in 1858 was appointed Captain Charles Stewart Boggs. light-house inspector on the Pacific coast. Placed in command of the gunboat Varuna, when the Civil War broke cut, he was with Admiral Farragut in the desperate fight on the Mississippi, near Forts Jackson and St. Philip. In that contest his conduct was admirable for bravery and fortitude. He was subsequently in command of various vessels on American and European stations, and was promoted to rear-admiral in July, 1870. He died in New Brunswick, April 22, 1888.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cummings, Andrew Boyd 1830- (search)
Cummings, Andrew Boyd 1830- Naval officer; born in Philadelphia, Pa., June 22, 1830; appointed midshipman in the United States navy in 1847; was executive officer of the Richmond when Farragut attacked Forts Jackson and St. Philip; mortally wounded during the battle; and died four days later, March 18, 1863.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dewey, George, 1837- (search)
the beginning of the Civil War, when he was assigned to the steam sloop Mississippi of the West Gulf squadron. On April 19, 1861, he was commissioned lieutenant, and was with Admiral Farragut when the latter's squadron forced the passage of forts St. Philip and Jackson in April, 1862. He also took part in the attack on Fort St. Philip and the subsequent battles with gunboats and ironclads which gave Farragut control of New Orleans. In the smoke of the battle the Mississippi ran aground withinFort St. Philip and the subsequent battles with gunboats and ironclads which gave Farragut control of New Orleans. In the smoke of the battle the Mississippi ran aground within range of the shore batteries. When it was seen Admiral George Dewey. Birthplace of Admiral Dewey. that the ship could not be saved, the officers and men set her afire and escaped in the boats. Later, Dewey served in the North Atlantic blockading squadron, and still later with the European squadron. In 1872 he was promoted to commander; in 1884 to captain; and in 1896 to commodore. He was appointed to command the Asiatic squadron in January, 1898, an assignment then considered but litt
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jackson and St. Philip, forts (search)
General Butler, who had accompanied the gunboats on their perilous passage on the Saxon, had returned to his transports, and in small boats his troops, under the general pilotage of Gen. Godfrey Weitzel, passed through bayous to the rear of Fort St. Philip. When he was prepared to assail it, the garrison was surrendered without Forts Jackson and St. Philip and environs. resistance (April 28), for they had heard of the destruction of the Confederate flotilla. The commander of Fort Jackson, , the garrison was surrendered without Forts Jackson and St. Philip and environs. resistance (April 28), for they had heard of the destruction of the Confederate flotilla. The commander of Fort Jackson, fearing that all was lost, accepted generous terms of surrender from Commodore Porter. The prisoners taken in the forts and at the quarantine numbered about 1,000. The entire loss of the Nationals from the beginning of the contest until New Orleans was taken was forty killed and 177 wounded.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jenkins, Thornton Alexander 1811-1893 (search)
Jenkins, Thornton Alexander 1811-1893 Naval officer; born in Orange county, Va., Dec. 11, 1811; appointed midshipman in 1828; commissioned lieutenant in 1839; promoted captain in 1862; and rear-admiral in 1870. In 1834 to 1860 he was employed on the coast survey, and in the lighthouse board. He was fleet captain, and commanded the Hartford when Farragut passed Forts Jackson and St. Philip below New Orleans, April 24, 1862; commanded the Richmond when Farragut captured Mobile in 1864. He died in Washington, D. C., Aug. 9, 1893.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Louisiana, (search)
ent communication between the city and the Gulf of Mexico; and proceeded to inspect and strengthen the fortifications in the vicinity, and to erect new ones. Fort St. Philip, below the city, was his main reliance for preventing a passage of the British ships. The expected invaders soon appeared. In fifty vessels of all sizes 7,0P. Benjamin, then sitting as members of the United States Senate, the governor of Louisiana (Moore) sent expeditions from New Orleans to seize Forts Jackson and St. Philip on the Mississippi, below the city, then in charge of Major Beauregard; also Fort Pike, on Lake Pontchartrain, and the arsenal at Baton Rouge. A part of General Palfrey's division went down the river in a steam-vessel, and on the evening of Jan. 10, 1861, the commander of Fort St. Philip (Dart) surrendered it; but the commander of Fort Jackson (Sergeant Smith), which surrendered, gave up the keys under protest. State troops seized Fort Livingston, on Grand Terre Island, Barataria Bay, a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McNair, Frederick Vallette 1839- (search)
McNair, Frederick Vallette 1839- Naval officer; born in Jenkintown, Pa., Jan. 13, 1839; graduated at the United States Naval Academy in June. 1857; promoted passed midshipman, June, 1860; master, October, 1860; lieutenant, April, 1861; lieutenant-commander, April, 1864; commander, January, 1872; captain, October, 1883; commodore, May, 1895; rear-admiral, 1898. In the latter year he was appointed superintendent of the United States Naval Academy. During the Civil War he took part in many engagements, including the actions at Fort Jackson, Fort St. Philip, and the Chalmette batteries; the capture of New Orleans; the opening of the Mississippi River; and the engagements and surrender at Fort Fisher. He died in Washington, D. C., Nov. 28, 1900.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mississippi River. (search)
nd fight Fort Jackson; while Capt. Theodorus Bailey (q. v.) with the second division, composed of eight gunboats, was to keep close to the left bank and fight Fort St. Philip. To Captain Bell, with six gunboats, was assigned the duty of attacking the Confederate fleet above the forts. Keeping in the channel, he was to push on to were silent until the Cayuga, Captain Bailey's ship, passed the boom, when heavy guns were brought to bear upon her. She did not reply until she was close to Fort St. Philip, when she gave it tremendous broadsides of grape and canister as she passed by. Four other gunboats were close in her wake and imitated her example, and the wrge Confederate steamer assailed her. She gave it a broadside, which set it on fire, and its swift destruction ensued. Then she brought her guns to bear upon Fort St. Philip and silenced that work. Meanwhile the Hartford was battling with Fort Jackson and encountering a fire-raft that set her ablaze, but the flames were soon exti
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New Orleans. (search)
so also were Commodore Farragut with a naval force, and Commodore D. D. Porter (q. v.) with a fleet of bomb-vessels to co-operate with the land force. At a short bend in the Mississippi River, 60 miles below New Orleans, were Forts Jackson and St. Philip. These, with some fortifications above and obstructions in the river below, were believed by the Confederates to make the stream absolutely impassable by vessels. There were then 10,000 troops in New Orleans under Gen. Mansfield Lovell. One oate one. In that struggle the Na- The Levee at New Orleans. tionals were victorious. While the battle was raging near the forts, General Butler landed his troops, and in small boats passed through narrow and shallow bayous in the rear of Fort St. Philip. The alarmed garrison surrendered to Butler without resistance, declaring they had been pressed into the service and would fight no more. When the forts were surrendered and the Confederate gunboats subdued, Farragut rendezvoused at Quar
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Nichols, Edward Tatnall 1823-1886 (search)
Nichols, Edward Tatnall 1823-1886 Naval officer; born in Augusta, Ga., March 1, 1823; graduated at the United States Naval Academy, and was commissioned a commander in 1862. When the Civil War broke out he was given command of the Winona of the Western Gulf blockading squadron. On April 28, 1862, Fort St. Philip, after having been bombarded, surrendered to him. Later he was placed in command of the steamer Mendote, with which he attacked the battery at Four Mile Creek on the James River, Va. He was promoted rear-admiral in 1878; retired in 1885. He died in Pomfret, Conn., Oct. 12, 1886.
... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 ...